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0

I'd bake the left overs on a baking sheet and freeze the result in zip bags. It will keep longer.


1

During the second world war my father and grandfather were bakers. Lard and most other oils were in short supply as they were used in the war effort to produce fuels and lubricants for the tanks, ship and other motorized vehicles. As a substitute in baking bread they used peanut butter but even it had most of the oils pressed out of it making it hard and dry....


0

There is instant, active, liquid, dry and fresh yeast. What are the culinary differences between all the types of yeast? They're in different states of activity, and thus require different types of preparation and amounts of time before they're able to do they're yeasty thing. Therefore, using dry yeast where active yeast is required will result in ...


1

I just cooked 12 baked potatoes; 6 shiny side out, and 6 shiny side in. Each potato was individually wrapped and all potatoes were about the same size. I cooked the shiny side out potatoes first then turned off the oven and left the oven door open for 30 minutes before cooking the other six. I also unwrapped both sets of potatoes after sitting for five ...


12

Yeasts are pretty much interchangeable but have different fermentation qualities. Most recipes will specify the kind and amount of yeast. Adding more yeast than called for makes bakes rise a little faster and taste yeastier, and this appears to be a regional preference in the US and in some other countries, so amounts called for in recipes will vary. ...


0

Yes, yeast is perishable. Typical instructions for testing yeast (active dry or cake, but NOT for instant yeast) include adding the packet (typically @ 2 tsp/ 7 g) yeast and 1 tbsp. granulated sugar to 1/2 cup / 113 ml (warm to very warm water (100-120ºF / 40-48ºc) and and letting it sit for about 10 minutes. It won't necessarily bubble up dramatically but ...


0

Based on your comments, it sounds like you're adding the dry yeast powder to water. The yeast typically won't bubble or do much of anything else at this phase. Yeast are microscopic organisms that produce gas by consuming sugars and excreting carbon dioxide. This requires that they have sugar to eat, which plain water of course doesn't. The main purpose of ...


2

I don't know exactly how much honey or sugar you should use. I make pizzas all the time and get sufficient browning to my taste, without adding any "browning agents." However, different recipes may react differently, and you may prefer a dough that browns faster or darker than mine. In any case, you'll need a lot more honey or sugar to replace the ...


2

According to this Korean blog post it is Salamande bread, and the packaging calls it "Taste of Europe". You know Koreans love a good European bakery. Salamande is also covered in this blog post as well.


1

Similar issue for me. BUT, I accidentally fixed it by placing plastic wrap over the finished but uncut tray to refrigerate it. When removed the wrap held the foam and lifted it off!


1

If you are lining your baking tray with parchment paper, try to omit the parchment paper. Grease your baking tray instead as presence of fat will encourage spreading. Happy trying!


1

If you want to substitute in kind, any margarine or vegetable shortening that is suitable for baking will do - it reads "Baking" on the label to indicate that the oils in the composition are heat resistant and will not degrade when exposed to oven temperatures. Example - Unsalted Baking Sticks @ Walmart.com


1

My understanding is that "cake margarine" is regular margarine which has been whipped to incorporate air. As long as you're using a stand mixer to cream the margarine and sugar (and do so at high speed), I suspect regular margarine should be fine, as that creaming step is intended to accomplish the same thing. If you chill the mixer bowl in the fridge, it'll ...


5

Giving a minimum time is not possible, because it depends on the size of the loaf, whether it is in a pan or not, and the ambient temperature of the location where it is cooling. In general, the recommendation is to cool the loaf to room temperature. If you are baking rolls, this might mean 30 minutes. For a larger loaf, it could be hours. At the risk of ...


0

First, I would say, don't cut the bread while hot; steam will escape too fast and dry out the bread. Restaurants warm the bread just before serving it to customers. Restaurants usually get (or make) their bread in the morning; so it is not warm when the restaurant opens.


3

My guess is that "white moist sugar" is meant literally -- that is, white sugar that is not completely dry. Granulated white sugar starts out wet, and is dried as the last step in the modern production process. At the time, sugar was sold in "loaves", which could be cut into pieces or more finely ground, rather than the hot-air convection process used ...


1

My method is like your first one, except after the first 10 minutes of baking, seal with beaten egg, and then bake for an additional 5 minutes to dry it.


2

In my personal experience, the freezing method has never worked well. I have a traditional quiche pan - white porcelain with vertical fluted walls - and it gets very cold in the freezer. No matter how I have played with temperature and top/bottom heater setting afterwards, I have never been able to compensate for the effect of the cold porcelain (a bit like ...


8

I bake extensively with whey protein concentrates and isolates. Well, to be clear, a combination of whey protein concentrates/isolates and other non-wheat type flours (flaxseed meal, almond flour, coconut flour, psyllium husk powder, etc.). One thing to mention right off the bat is that whey protein and gluten do not mix. Well, let me explain. In some of my ...


4

I haven't baked with it myself, though I've used it in other recipes, and you don't provide links to specific recipes, but whey protein products are mostly very similar: the actual protein concentrate* and flavouring/sweeteners. You'll need to stick to a similar flavour for the recipe to be similar. This is especially true if it expects unflavoured: you ...


6

The major types of whey protein are: Whey protein concentrate. This has a protein content hovering around 75%. It has a fairly milky taste and smooth mouth feel. Whey protein isolate. This has closer to 90% protein. The taste is more neutral than WPC. Hydrolyzed whey protein, which has been processed to break apart proteins and make it more readily ...


0

As stated in the other answers, extracts don't contain sweeteners, or if they do, the dose is miniscule. So you won't actually be adding sweeteners to your product. But the human sense of taste doesn't work like an analytic chemistry device. It depends on what is in the brain as much as on what is in the mouth. So, for people who have learned to associate ...


0

Ungreased copy paper works well for regular meringue cookies, but I can't say if it would work for a cheesecake Silicone, parchment paper, or baking sheets greased with butter seem to be your best bets, unfortunately.


7

It would not work. The benefit of egg is that it is largely (aside from water) comprised of protein (~12g/100g). This forms a stable structure when you whip it, that is maintained because the proteins denature (that's why the white goes white from clear when cooked) and form an insoluble and highly stable mass. Cream, on the other hand is largely fat (19g/...


2

I know this is years later, but this may give more info. If there is any sugar in an extract, the amount is so small it would not be noticeable. Too much extract to try to gain sweetness and you'll end up with something tasting horrible. Extracts are concentrated flavors from the plant oils, either pure or with additives. "Pure" means the flavor must be ...


1

Fan ovens are generally regarded as 10% hotter than regular ovens, so I would suggest fan only, dropping the oven thermostat setting down by that amount than your recipe dictates. Fan mode will give you a more even, consistent temperature throughout the whole oven, whereas the different elements (and non-fan mode) will bring different results. Using the top ...


1

You can cut the sugar to 1/2 cup, given that raisins included in the recipe. To make the bars lighter, try adding 3/4 cup butter or coconut oil and 1 teaspoon of baking powder.


-1

Try adding 3/4 cup of butter or coconut oil.


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