New answers tagged

3

This is a very vexing case, I douobt that anybody can tell from looking at your cake. So you will have to troubleshoot it yourself by first trying to bake a successful cake by following a traditional recipe and using best practices, and then, if that cake works well, start changing it back towards your preferred recipe one-by-one and seeing what makes the ...


2

Are you at a high altitude? https://www.exploratorium.edu/cooking/icooks/article-3-03.html Low air pressure has two main effects on baked goods: They will rise more easily, and lose moisture faster; liquids evaporate more quickly since water boils at lower temperatures at high altitude. As leavening occurs faster, gas bubbles tend to coalesce into ...


0

I've been making Yorkies, as a 'true-born native Yorkshireman' * for 40 years & often think "dammit, I've only got extra-large eggs this week… wonder how the Yorkies will turn out". Oddly, they almost always turn out the same. As a joke, maybe 20 years ago I actually wrote my Yorkie recipe on the inside of the cupboard door. It's still there, though a ...


3

I take it you didn't read Kenji's Serious Eats column The Science of the Best Yorkshire Puddings which is linked from the recipe column. It discusses his experiments with various factors affecting Yorkshire puddings addressing some of your points including liquid (eggs + milk + water) to flour ratios and amounts of fats (yolks + milk) as well as technique. ...


1

Here are a few more variables not yet mentioned: oven temperature: Consumer ovens are notoriously inaccurate -- even if you set yours for 350°F, you might actually get 400°F or even higher. Baking at too high a temperature will of course lead to over-baking. baking powder: Baking powder has a limited shelf life; once you open the can, it starts to absorb ...


0

Most recipes want you to put all the ingredients in a bowl and mix, but in my experience, this sets you up for failure. First you want to mix all of the dry ingredients completely Especially when dealing with baking powder. Baking powder and egg gives you the rise you need in your cake, but if a clump of baking soda doesn't get spread througoht your cake, ...


2

I've been substituting ground oat bran for flour for muffins, waffles, and muffins for as long as I can remember, when I am on a diet or a family member is. I have noticed the results to be a tad drier than with regular flour, so i just add a splash (maybe a tablespoon) more liquid (water or milk) depending on what I am doing. I hope that answers your ...


3

I have a 4.5l kitchen aid, the most cream I have ever whipped in it was 1l. The limitation is the wire whisk, you don't want so much that the level gets above the level at which the whisk can contact it, as then it won't whip effectively. Too much also will get messy, getting all over the rotating parts.


5

There are a number of technique that you may find acceptable as alternatives to an oven, it in part depends on what equipment you have available. Any of these technique have their champions and recipes can quickly be found with a web search. Try "stove top cheesecake" and you will find recipes for using a covered frying pan for instance. I personally have ...


1

You won't get apple-tasting bread by using apples. What you think of as "taste" is actually the aroma of the apple, and has little to do with the taste buds. A whole fresh apple tastes of apples. If you put pieces of an apple in the dough, it is already a large amount of dough to a smaller amount of apple (your bread would fall apart if you were to use more ...


5

I suggest that (in addition to using a reduction of the juice*/cider) you add some solid apple. Personally I would get dried apple, of a tasty variety if at all possible, and put it through a food processor until fairly fine. I dehydrate my own home-grown apples, selected for flavour, but would buy Cox or Granny Smith for this. Then add as you would other ...


1

Bread does not have to be made with milk, in fact that is rare - bread is usually made with water. You could substitute apple cider for milk for a much stronger apple flavor, my concern with that approach is the sugar you are adding (apple cider is very sweet) for 2 reasons: Yeast is retarded by sugar, so a lot of sugar will inhibit your yeast growth. Many ...


0

In a pizza making class I took once, in NY, a person asked "what advice to you have for gluten free crusts" The teacher said "don't do it"... basically, gluten is a very important part of flour from most aspects of baking, and forgoing it makes life a lot harder. But, I understand, some people have reasons. I would say this, yes, you can over beat ...


3

The reason to spread out oven fries into a single layer is to remove moisture from them more effectively, so they don't end up soggy. An air fryer's convective heating is much more effective at removing moisture, even compared to a convection oven. So piling them up doesn't cause much of a problem. If your air fryer doesn't have a stirring arm, you should ...


2

Assuming that you ask about the dry product that usually consists of mostly sugar plus vanillin (or if really posh, genuine vanilla), the recommendation is to treat it like sugar and add it together with the other sugar in the recipe. The total amount is small(ish), so unless you are making something very sensitive and finicky, adding it to the flour won’t ...


3

You should use it as the sugar the recipe calls for. In this case, whip it with the eggs and oil. The vanilla in vanilla sugar is for flavoring and does not really alter the sugar.


2

Gluten development, leavening, moisture, bake time, and temperature are all very important. But one thing that stands out to me about your recipe is that it has a bit more carrot relative to the sugar and flour. Additions like carrot (or applesauce or banana) don't have any gluten, so they don't contribute to that air-capturing structure. Instead that puree ...


3

We regularly use the King Arthur Flour recipe, and consistently get waffles that are crispy on the outside, soft on the inside. A couple suggestions: Make sure the waffle iron is completely preheated before adding the batter. This recipe does need the waffles to cook for long enough; they'll be slightly dark. If you're only cooking them to a light golden, ...


1

The protein content of the flour, as @moscafj describes, and the way it is handled are partly responsible for the strength of the gluten network in cakes, breads, etc. But there are other factors that affect gluten development, some of which are very important in the recipe you've provided. In wheat flour, the proteins (two principle types, glutenins and ...


2

You do need some gluten structure formation for the cake to rise and for the dough to trap air as it bakes. You should realize that different flours have different levels of the proteins that work to create these structures. All purpose flour is generally a mixture that provides a protein content for most applications. Think of it as your "average" flour (...


6

Gluten development is not something you need for a cake to rise, excess gluten development in a cake leads to a tough cake, dense cakes are usually caused by a different reason. With a carrot cake my first thoughts would be: Too much moisture: carrot and other vegetable cakes can get very wet due to the moisture in the vegetables added, an overly wet batter ...


3

Most pie recipes that begin with a high-temperature setting and then lower it are to bake the crust. It isn't necessarily for frozen crusts only, but also for fresh-baked crusts that often need high heat to set and create the "flaky" pastry texture that many people desire. (Also, unbaked crusts can absorb too much liquid on the bottom before they set ...


23

I agree with FuzzyChef's answer, though I'd emphasize in general that this is often a question as shape as well as volume. A cake that is increased in size but also baked in a wider pan so its overall thickness is about the same as the original may not need much additional cooking time at all, or the increase might be small. When one increases all ...


18

My cooking club, several years ago, obtained a worksheet from a commercial manufacturer of cake pans, which I've just republished (I can't name the company, but I can share the data). As you can see from the sheet, when making white cake, an increase in volume of 50% results in an increase in cooking time of about 5 minutes, provided that you are not ...


3

As Ron Beyer alluded to in a comment, two pans on different oven racks can end up cooking very differently. Remember, the heat comes from particular parts of the oven: for an electric oven generally top and bottom heading elements, and for a gas oven convection from the bottom. Pans placed close to the bottom of the oven will get extra coming on the ...


2

Pizza dough is basically a bread. So, like other bread formulas, can be developed and expressed using a bakers percentage. For a Napolitan pizza most pizzaiolos use .1 to .5 percent yeast. This is the percentage as compared to the total amount of flour (usually tipo "OO" for this style). So, your initial research is a good starting point. You will have ...


1

No, you can't make such a generalization. There are many possible ratios, and they interact with the ratio of the other ingredients and with the process used to make the pizza. That's exactly why have recipes: each recipe is a combination of ratios and process that work well together. If you want to make a pizza, your chances for success are highest if you ...


3

Yes, the whole batch is unusable. Baking doesn't change anything, food safety rules don't foresee turning unsafe food back into safe.


3

Likely no adjustment is necessary if they fit in your oven with good circulation. If it is a tight fit, you might want to add a few minutes, and/or rotate them halfway through the cooking. Your best approach is to simply measure the temperature of your product around the 45 minute mark and adjust from there.


1

I can suggest two and a half ways to check. Muffins are closest to pound cake. The closer the base recipe to a pound cake (1:1:1:1 sugar:flour:eggs:butter by weight), the more likely that it will give you something muffin-like. If there is a liquid added, this can still work quite well. By thickness. If a recipe is supposed to produce a thick and spongy ...


Top 50 recent answers are included