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1

I think your fat-to-flour ratio for that kind of flour might be too high. Cake flour can't handle a lot of fat. As another answer suggested, try a higher protein flour--start with all-purpose (AP) flour and, if that isn't enough, use bread flour but remember to barely stir it together or you will make a mess. I would mix everything together except the flour ...


1

Have you baked it in the right pan shape? This is pretty normal rising for cakes baked in a pan with a narrow shape, so either the loaf pan your picture uses, or a bundt (guggelhupf) pan. When you have a standard chemically leavened cake in it (the closer to a pound cake, the better, as opposed to some more demanding batters), it will almost automatically ...


2

You don't want a 'super hot' oven. 50°F/25°C can make a big difference in how fast the cake rises. It's likely he's also using a fan-assist oven. You can reduce how quickly the top browns by either making the batter slightly more acidic or putting a sheet pan above it to reduce the radiant heat so that you can get more lift before the top sets. You'll ...


3

Pierre Herme's "Cake Ispahan" is basically a pound cake flavoured with rose, raspberry and litchi, then glazed. Let's look at the ingredients as reported on PH's own online shop: Sugar water wheat flour (GLUTEN) EGGS cream (MILK) butter (MILK) freeze-dried raspberries (2,6%), freeze-dried litchis (2,6%), hydrogenated vegetal fats (coconut and palm kernel ...


0

My banana bread/cake calls for 2 cups of mashed bananas. I use 1 cup mashed ripe bananas (the riper the sweeter) and 1 cup mango puree (strained to remove strings). It comes out very moist.


-1

When butter spills out of the croissant during baking, the most likely issue is underproofing.


1

You're missing a step. You have to let them proof after forming them into rings. Just like how for bread making you always have to double proof, or else it'll be like pizza or pita dough. After that they should be fine, just take care not to handle them too aggressively while moving to and from the boiling water (Again, just like bread. You deflate the ...


1

Your ingredients ratios are on point, same as I use. Be careful not to over-proof, it causes deflation. Also, you might not be kneading quite enough. I ran into these issues myself on my quest for the perfect homemade bagels. Knead 15 minutes and proof at room temp (70° F) for 1 hour. Portion into nice rubbery balls and pinch them into rings. I find this ...


6

Usually you would twist the top of the bag (hint: don’t overfill) to close the bag and to get a “basic pressure level”, which will depend on the consistency of whatever is in the bag. Somewhat taut, but not leaking out of the nozzle. Then you hold the bag closed at the twist part with thumb and forefinger, a bit like a ok-sign, just closer. Gradually ...


3

You apply pressure from the top and work your way down. If you squeeze from the middle, forces are applied which will force frosting in both directions including up where you don't want it to go. You use the other hand to guide the nozzle.


1

For home cooked bagels, save the malt for the dough, about a tbsp for 4 bagels works for me or 270 g flour 150 g water, and just put a tsp or two of baking soda plus a tbsp of salt in the water bath. I do 15 sec on each side, no more no less. Just made a batch this morning but had to leave out the malt (use malted milk in a pinch), but adding other flavors ...


0

So many opinions. My experience, even after doing an excellent bread-making course, is.. as long as you understand the principles then whatever works for you is fine... and make sure you have fun! I have scored over-proofed loaves that simply collapse as a result and have decided that if I let it proof a little too long it's better not to score as it won't ...


2

You'd have to do it at the time you form the loaf for the first bake. One way would be to use a layer or two of chocolate sticks (as used in pain au chocolat but seemingly sold as "croissant sticks"). This would be very suitable chocolate as even melted it's not too runny. You could probably split them to get more, thinner sticks. You could melt chocolate ...


-1

Yes, you can substitute soy milk powder if it's not for any dietary purposes or yours not allergic to anything full cream powdered milk can b used. There's also other milk almond. Not sure if that's in powder form.


0

If your question can be changed slightly to: What to use instead of cling film to prevent pastry dough from drying out when resting (or storing) in the refrigerator?, here is what I would do. Similar to what others have suggested, find a glass container or plastic tub with lid a little larger than the footprint of the dough. Place a ramekin (smaller than ...


5

Sure you can freeze rolled out pastry, it can be a real time-saver. The trick is to make sure it's protected from freezer burn, otherwise it can dry out. Putting it between two sheets of wax paper works well, then rolling it up and putting it in a freezer bag. You need to let it thaw before unrolling it otherwise it will break up and you'll have to roll it ...


7

Put it in a bowl, large enough so the dough doesn't reach the top (if possible), cover it with a damp dishtowel (not wet, just damp). Voila. Totally ecological, and works better than plastic wrap because the dough can breathe. If the towel touches the dough, you might have to scrape it off depending on the dough and the time involved, but that's not ...


4

I have always used wax paper to wrap pastry for the fridge. It's always worked for me. (Note: this is not the same thing as the baking paper/parchment mentioned in other answers.)


54

It is less useful than what you think Frame challenge incoming... Cling film is very light and made especially for such purposes. The environmental damage is extremely low - which limits what alternatives you can choose. Most alternatives (including those already mentioned in the other answers) will be so much more resource demanding to make, dispose or ...


5

I have reusable teflon sheets for lining cake tins and baking sheets. They also work well for wrapping pastry and dough. With pastry the easiest way is to make a folded parcel with the opening side underneath on a plate or dish. They wash up by hand or in the dishwasher and also save you lots of baking parchment/greaseproof paper and some foil. Another ...


11

You don't have to use clingfilm (cling wrap, saran wrap depending where you are in the world), there are alternatives as long as the pastry is not sticky: Plastic bags: I reuse zippable plastic bags as many times as I can, you can wash them by turning them inside out Baking paper: baking paper can be re-used as long as it stays clean Aluminum foil: again ...


0

I often bake cakes for my nieces and nephews when they visit from Japan. They both love oranges but I don’t so I tried baking a cake and just zesting it with orange after it was cooked so that i could have my own slice without any orange flavouring. It came out beautifully and the kids said it was the perfect amount of orange. They loved it!! So, try the ...


5

I have marked George M's answer as the accepted answer, but I thought I would post a slightly expanded answer. I can confirm that the following ideas that were raised in the comments did not work: Hotter oven Cooking longer Cooling completely What has worked is to wrap the bread completely in a tea towel or two until completely cool. Then, the bread ...


1

In my own cookie making experience, substituting margarine for butter yielded a crispier cookie than butter. Sometimes too crispy. The Perfect Cookie dismisses non butter fats for cookies although they did suggest the trick of substituting a small amount of butter for liquid oil to increase chewiness. The margarine cookies slump and get crispy and almost ...


2

Browning will not occur at 275 even if you leave the potatoes in the oven for days. So if you are happy with soft, creamy, pale potatoes, your method will work. But if you want a nice brown crust, you'll have to take out the ham and turn the oven up to 375 or more for the last 15 minutes or so of cooking.


4

Angel food cake is a very different type of cake from a standard vanilla sponge cake it's mostly egg whites and sugar, other cakes have more flour, so if you want to try and modify it I'd be thinking more flour and maybe some butter. If it was me I wouldn't bother though. It may be possible to modify the mix, but you'd have to reverse engineer the recipe ...


0

Scalloped potatoes will cook in 3 hours at 275°. I have done it before and there are recipes that call for that time and temperature.


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