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2

You could try to cook the ckhicken as-is, but the result will not taste good at all. You could instead use the oven to make a chicken soup. Microvave ovens can heat/boil water if placed in thin-walled porcelain container, such as a bowl. Separate the chicken into pieces that fit a porcelain bowl, add water and chicken soup ingredients. Do not leave the ...


0

OK, you can do this. This is tough though. NEVER UNDER COOK CHICKEN. Under cooked chicken is both disgusting and dangerous. Overcooked chicken is just tough and disgusting, but not dangerous, The key is to NOT OVERCOOK THE CHICKEN, and NOT UNDER COOK CHICKEN. Its a tough balancing act, but if you experiment with your microwave and are patient you can ...


4

There's not going to be a good way to cook a "steak" (I assume you mean a chicken filet, or a single large-ish piece of chicken without bones), but you may be able to make do with something close. Microwaves do one particular kind of cooking well: steaming. Chicken doesn't taste great steamed, but it's not terrible, either. As long as you add some ...


18

By itself? Not really, the results will end up edible (i.e. fully cooked) but not very tasty (chewy, no searing/caramelization). However, there are dedicated "microwave grill" devices like the Microhearth Grill Pan (others might be better, google will help, this is just the one I have experience with) that you can put into your microwave oven. They convert ...


26

A microwave can cook a beef steak or piece of chicken to a safe temperature and make it edible, however the result is often tough and you won't get a crust of any kind on it. When you cook something on a pan or on a grill/broiler the outside is exposed to a high temperature, giving the outside a chance to go through chemical changes like Maillard reactions ...


2

I make naan on my BGE all the time. You can't replicate a tandoor, however, the results are very good. I find it best to cook the naan directly on the grill, and over the coals. I find lower heat is best. I either bake them at the end of a grill session, when the heat is dying, or I completely close the bottom vent (leaving the lid open...not just the lid ...


2

If the package of cake mix got smaller (and otherwise didn't change) then you could try reducing every ingredient by a similar amount, to keep all the ratios the same. If the package decreased from 18 to 15 ounces, that's makes the new package 83.3% (15÷18) the size of the old one. You'll want to reduce other ingredients similarly. Your "18 oz recipe" ...


1

I have read that flaxseed meal helps in baking. I use a combination of almond meal, coconut flour and baking powder with mct oil & eggs to make keto bread, it works really well toasted or fried as a carrier for cheese or eggs, or anything savoury. Slendier have some nice soy, edamame and black bean pastas if you are looking for a wheat substitute. Hope ...


2

I added baking powder to a small amount of additional meal with some water to make it more liquid than solid, then I poured it into/onto the dough and remixed everything together. Thus I had a brand new dough with the baking powder.


4

Marble rolling pins are for laminated pastry, which is high in butter and kept fridge cold (the idea is to chill the rolling pin as well), so you need not flour the rolling pin or the dough. They are not for other types of dough. Marble rolling pins are for the aesthetically aware and the laminated dough enthusiasts. These rolling pins are rather ...


0

Expectations for "shaping" can vary a lot in a recipe. Years ago, I tended toward a minimalistic shaping routine, degassing as little as necessary just to get rid of large bubbles and form the dough into the rough shape I wanted. (This was, for example, the gentle shaping promoted by Peter Reinhart, based on the idea that gentle shaping would lose less gas ...


3

I understand that you can either punch or fold dough before shaping it and both have different benefits. Just understand what you're doing. During the fermentation process (rising), yeast consumes sugar and starch in the dough and turns it into alcohol, carbon dioxide, etc. That carbon dioxide collects gets trapped in the dough (thanks largely to the gluten)...


1

For Neapolitan pizza, once my dough is shaped into pizza-sized balls, it rests anywhere from 30 minutes to a couple of hours. At this point I do not punch or fold! I am gentle with each ball, forming it into a disk with a combination of turns on the countertop, and gently stretching with fists under the dough. Most importantly, I find, is that I try not ...


1

It's pizza dough, the shaping comes at the end, this is just dividing nothing complex is required. A bit of punching is good to get rid of any large air bubbles to make sure you divide it evenly. Remember you will be nocking a load of air out when you make the base, so it's not important to preserve lift in pizza dough in proofing.


4

I'm with you, I don't like marble pins (maybe for a cold lamination, but that's fairly specialised). One thing I've found with marble pins is that they're often a 'two part' design, where the handle rotates independently from the rolling surface. This means your hands just grip the handles, and the friction from the dough is what causes the 'roller' to roll....


1

My mother (a retired Irish Home Economics teacher!) says that a true sponge cake contains no fat (ie. no butter - butter in the recipe makes a 'butter sandwich cake', not a sponge). For her sponge, she separates the egg whites and yolks, beats them separately, and uses only the egg whites as the raising agent - and her sponges are beautiful!


15

Marble has a very slick surface, so flour will not stick to it as well as wood, a much more porous material. You need to dust the dough with flour instead of the pin, or use parchment paper between the pin and the dough. Marble pins conducts heat away from the dough quicker than wood, and work better when butter is incorporated into the dough (like puff ...


35

Yes, in my experience it is almost impossible to coat a marble rolling pin with flour. However, like flour many doughs tend to stick less to the very smooth surface, and because a marble rolling pin can stay colder for a longer time than a wooden one, some doughs get much less sticky, e.g. if they contain lots of butter. If you have problems with dough ...


1

There's a couple of options. I've never heard of "sweet stones of Perosa", but if the recipe actually goes back many years then it's likely it originally used extremely thin silver (or other metal) foil, stuck to the buns and then baked. Those pictures don't look like edible foil, though. The silver is attenuated at the sides. That makes me think they're ...


0

A crackle or crinkle cookie is created with a specific recipe, and then individual cookies are rolled into a ball for baking. The ball is then, most commonly, rolled into powdered sugar. The nature of the dough is such that when baking, the cracks form, and the sugar highlights these irregularities. I don't know for certain, but I would guess that this is ...


1

Chiffon cake gets its rise from: The chemical reaction of the baking powder Expansion of water into vapor The expansion of air trapped in the batter Chiffon cake gets a great deal of lift from #3, mostly from egg whites that are whipped and then folded into the batter. If you are not getting a fluffy cake then these are the most common mistakes. Not ...


4

When it comes to kneading, scaling partially depends on your physical capabilities. It's a physical activity, you may not be able to manipulate double the dough in the same way. If you have the arms of a gorilla it will probably take far less than double the time, if you are on the weaker end of the scale it may take you longer than twice the time as you ...


2

I don't think that using set amount of time for set amount if ingredients is the way to go. There are too many variables that would affect the result (type of flour, temp of water, type and amount yeast, temperature in which the dough is resting etc). I would just give the dough extra time for it to work on itself (kneading is just speeding up the natural ...


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