New answers tagged

3

After you prove dough the yeast will continue to be active until they are killed by heat (or meet some other untimely demise). If you prove store-bought dough and then put it in the fridge, the cold temperature will slow down the metabolism of the yeast greatly, so yes, you are probably OK doing this for some period of time, but that's probably hours or ...


1

I would suggest piping your dough. Also, be sure your oven is thoroughly preheated, and you'll have much better results using a pizza stone or oven steel. I would suggest baking in the middle of the oven on only one layer (don't use two racks at once). Preheat the oven to about 15°C hotter than you are going to bake and then turn it down to baking temp as ...


1

Beside the effect on yeast growth speed mentioned in other answers, the temperature of the water also has a direct effect on gluten formation. Using the same ratio of water to flour, you will get much stiffer gluten with colder water. Of course, you cannot make use of this effect in a bread maker, since you cannot influence the other variables (especially ...


13

With a bread maker, it's important to follow the recipe closely, at least until you've got a reliable result , when you can start experimenting. Mine, for example, expects "tepid" water for most programs, which the book defines as 20-25°C. The super rapid program requires 46-51°C. Cooler and there won't be time for the yeast to get going, much ...


4

Temperature matters a lot, even with a breadmaker. Breadmaking is all about gluten development and feeding the yeast so they produce alcohol and carbon dioxide. The water temperature will have a direct impact on how quickly the fungi propagate. In traditional breadmaking, ambient room temperature and oven temperature are also important. Knowing what ...


0

Assuming you're starting with course corn flour, if you're up for some science and fun, I'd suggest you try using liquid nitrogen to freeze it and then use a high-speed blender (like a Vitamix with grain setup) or food processor to grind it finely. Use this trick also to grind your almond flour extra fine for macarons. If liquid nitrogen is not in the cards ...


1

So now you have the oven thermostat saying one thing and a thermometer saying something else. As other answers have said, that could be because you didn't wait long enough for the oven to heat evenly, or that the thermometer is not in a good location. If neither of those applies, the only conclusion you can draw is that one of them is wrong. In order to ...


1

Cooks Illustrated solved this problem in their pumpkin cheesecake recipe by removing the water from the pumpkin puree. They simply spread the puree on a towel or paper towel.


3

There's 2 aspects about making fluffy french toast: Bread: Fluffy french toast comes from fluffy bread. Dense breads like brioche and many whole wheats and sourdoughs aren't going to be light no matter what you do. You need a lighter, fluffier bread, a lot of times mass marketed non-artisan breads are the way to go Dipping: fluffy bread is full of air, and ...


0

another method for completeness that also uses math: try to match the target water percentage subtract water: weigh out pumpkin weight of (banana recipe grams of banana) * (.90/.72) and dehydrate to reach that weight likewise for fruit with less water if the substituting dried figs at about 24% water, weigh out figs = (banana recipe grams of banana) ...


0

Overnight proofing in the fridge is a great way to improve flavor, as you suggest (creating more alcohol and allowing a better gluten structure). There are a couple of things you should keep in mind. First is the temperature and length of your bulk fermentation. Too long and/or at too high a temp it could be using up most of the sugars, and the yeast could ...


5

I'm sure that there area a zillion recipes for both breads. I found a recipe for two 9x5 loafs. Pumpkin bread using One 15-ounce can pure pumpkin puree. Banana bread using eight very ripe bananas (unpeeled, about 32 ounces?). Most of the ingredients are similar, but the seasoning varies. I assume that the desire with the pumpkin bread recipe is to have ...


24

There's no trick, there's math. 100g of banana is about 75g of water (1g of water is 1ml, so easy to measure), 12g of sugar, and 13g of fiber and other stuff. A pumpkin is about 92g of water and 3 grams of sugar, leaving 5g of other stuff. My banana bread recipe calls for 2 medium bananas, that's about 250g of banana. That's 188g of water and about 30g ...


6

Baking is part science, part alchemy, and part luck. There are so many variable you can't control when you bake that you really need to use your senses and instruments to determine when something is done. If you are substituting in a recipe, you definitely want to account for the water difference, so this is an astute question. If you can estimate how ...


3

If all you have is a convection microwave to cook with and the choice is microwave or convection mode then do convection mode as it's closer to baking. Microwaving a pizza will most likely turn it into overcooked rubber, convection gives you a chance. It's a good idea to cut the pizza into manageable chunks that the oven mode can handle, don't cram it in. ...


6

Convection simply moves air around to heat evenly. I don't suggest cooking pizza in a microwave oven at all. If you don't want to use a conventional oven I would suggest trying to cook the pizza on a cast iron skillet instead. The secret to pizza is to cook as hot and quickly as possible, both top and bottom. This is more difficult to achieve in a pan, but ...


0

I notice a serious lack of liquid in this recipe. This results in the flour not fully being dissolved and the cookies being crumbly. Replacing the milk powder with milk should improve the recipe, or you could just add some water.


1

One think I would try is changing up the egg white to egg yolk recipe by multiplying the other ingredients by 1.5x and adding an extra yolk. Egg yolks are a source of emulsified fat and they keep cookies fudgier (and chewier). For other variables you can tweak, you might look at J. Kenji Lopez Alt's guide to chocolate chip cookies. He takes each ingredient 1 ...


4

Grains such as wheat are little self-contained capsules of everything needed to grow a plant (up until its first leaves, after which it can pull from its environment). Plants, like animals and fungus such as yeast, require a source of energy for its cells to function. That energy source is the carbon-hydrogen bond in sugars. A seed needs sugars to grow ...


15

The answer is that there are a range of (natural) sugars in the flour and a range of sugars that can be generated by the yeast by breaking down the starches and other carbohydrates in flour. Yeast are a hardy organism and can metabolize many different carbohydrates to produce sugars for successful growth. Carbohydrates are chemical compounds composed of ...


0

Here is a trick from The Perfect Cookie Cookbook. I do this all the time now. Take away 1 tablespoon butter and add 1 tablespoon cooking oil. I have been using sunflower oil but any minimally flavored (corn, canola) or nutty oil should work. Not coconut oil - the idea is that the oil is less solid at room temperature than butter but coconut oil is ...


2

There are not that many uses for pollen tbh. one of the ways i used it is make smoothies with it or mix it into some ice cream, even perhaps a garnish or a topping for delicacies. Bee pollen pairs particularly well with honey mustard dressings, poppy seed dressings or slightly sweet vinaigrette so mix it into your salads.


0

I have tried brushing with cold water every 10 mins if some bits of the crust, e.g. edges, are going brown too fast. Seems to work pretty well.


1

To spell out the informaiton which has been implicit in other answers and comments: Sourdough is not bread dough, it is an ingredient for bread dough (one of many). If you bake it on your own, it is no wonder you are getting undesirable results. To bake bread, you have to follow a recipe for bread dough. You have the choice between different styles. Some ...


1

I recommend buying a good instant read thermometer and baking bread to at least 200F. If it goes up to 210F it's fine and will have a better crust. When you take the temp, push the thermometer all the way down and pull it out slowly while you watch the temp change. This is why you want instant read (digital) because it reacts immediately. It is not unusual ...


1

It sounds like you have a sourdough starter recipe, but you haven't been using a bread recipe. What follows are a list of sourdough bread recipes from the internet that can get you started: https://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-sourdough-bread-224367 https://www.theclevercarrot.com/2014/01/sourdough-bread-a-beginners-guide/ https://www.kingarthurflour.com/...


3

As a 4 carbon sugar alcohol, erythritol lacks both strongly acid and strongly basic groups. pH of a 1 molar solution will run around 7. It is not going to affect the pH of a solution when you add erythritol. It will affect osmolarity, and water activity but those are different properties.


0

I think there are a couple things to troubleshoot here. Check that the oven is working. you can buy an in oven thermometer to verify that you are getting accurate readings. seems you have done this already. Could the oven be steam-injection? that could cause some problems with done-ness. Maybe some other part of your process is different now that you are ...


0

Nuts are good for protein so as well as the peanut butter so why not add chopped pecans or walnuts etc which hopefully won’t affect the texture but will add a nice crunch and more protein. Also Organic Einkorn flour has around 20% protein as opposed to other wheats which have about 9-12%, unless of course you’re gluten free? You can find great recipes eg ...


2

In addition to rumtscho's answer: Replacing the almond milk with made up whey protein should get the proportions up. You might want to experiment with different types of protein (I've heard good things about brown rice protein though I haven't tried it on its own myself) for their effect on the texture.


4

Your goals here contradict each other. The reason that a brownie has a brownie-like texture is that it is made out of brownie batter. When you start leaving out some ingredients and pushing different ingredients into the batter, the texture of the resulting product changes. And when you add more protein, you end up with something that's drier than a brownie, ...


1

Here is how I maintain my sourdough and use it for bread making: I take out 50g sourdough from my culture, add 80g flour, 50g water - mix it, put it into a clean jar and leave it on the kitchen counter for the night (c.a. 10h) then put it in the fridge I use the rest (c.a. 130g) of the sourdough for bread. I add the sourdough to mixed water and flour (...


0

The main downside not mentioned in other answers: If you do find an appropriate separator material (e.g. silicone sheets cut to size), you are going to have a significant difference in pancake thickness. The bottom batter layers will spread much more than higher ones, due to the weight of the above layers pressing down -- while cooked pancakes have enough ...


Top 50 recent answers are included