New answers tagged

3

Putting the rye in the levain will make a few positive differences: The rye will give the yeast a different food source, so the flavors the yeast produces may be subtly different It gives the flavors from the rye grain longer to permeate the dough Rye is often used in sourdough starters because of its natural yeasts. Natural yeasts add complex flavors, the ...


1

If you want to askew chewy, bake longer at a lower temperature. That is what I do as I prefer the crispy/crunchy texture.


3

There are several ingredients and procedures that work together to determine the structure and texture of a cookie. At the end of this recipe on ChefSteps, there is a very detailed explanation. I am sure it is possible to make a savory version, you are just going to have to be creative in your approach. If you search their site, they also have tips for ...


1

I understand it the same way: the wetter side on top. The Bottom side sucked up the oil while leavening. And by turning the dough she gets also the other side greasy. I think the lady just likes to use her hands. As she turns the dough she pushes her finger inside it to spread it. I actually don't see a different way to do the focaccia as you are supposed ...


1

Place the vegetable loaf in 325° oven for 20 minutes. Then add the casserole beside your vegetable loaf in the 325° oven for 20 minutes. Then raise the oven temperature to 340° for another 20 minutes. You might want to check both dishes 5 to 10 minutes after raising the oven temperature to see if either one or both are done. If only one is finished cooking, ...


1

I use my oven so often and I like baking, I use fan when I bake biscuit, but not for cake baking. When I bake pies I feel is more dry if I use the fan, so I still wonder what is the best way!!!


1

An unescorted loaf of bread, in a loaf pan, generally bursts along the top of the loaf pan. If you want a "burst" look you need to score the area you want a burst using a razor blade or sharp knife. Are you making a no-knead loaf in a Dutch oven? They generally burst along the shaggy seams. Rob is right, scoring and bread turning into a brick are not ...


3

You can make some sort of bread by adding plenty of the highest protein wheat flour you have. You'll have to judge the hydration when you knead. I'd aim for proportions like a yeast-risen cornbread (or failing that a basic enriched dough) , and make it into rolls, then eat them warm (or reheated). Rising will also be a matter of guesswork/judgment. I find ...


0

I blame the banana. Always blaming the banana. Bananas get black, they do. Go again but this time sub in smashed canned pears and a spoon or 2 of mascarpone cheese instead of banana.


0

If you take a look at the results of.. why does my tea turn dark dark darker when I add baking soda. The results indicate that the chemistry changes. Acids create lighter colors. Bases remove some acid ions and allow darker base ions to color the product. Use the baking powder and add a squish of lemon juice, the muffins should be lighter..


2

It all depends on what you want the whipped egg whites to accomplish. Generally you use the wipped-egg-white-method in order to incorporate more air into the batter, which is mostly used for cakes. In this case you definitely want to add them at the end, so the air stays in the batter. For cookies, this is probably not necessary, because you can't ...


1

Do you have a recipe? I'd follow that.. That said, this sounds like a lot of cakes I've made. Usually you cream the butter and sugar, then add the eggs to that. Finally you add the flour mixed with leavening, not mixing too much, and toss it quickly into the oven. That gives the best use of leavening.


-2

To give you an idea that putting solid chocolate in the batter works https://youtu.be/uJFSnCukXJY


0

Again...make sure the cake batter is not runny (not talking about chocolate here)....chop the chocolate bar into pieces and mix it with flour (the flour will help not let the chocolate pieces not fall to the bottom of the cake)....then when it's time to prepare the pan....pour half of the cake batter then add the chopped chocolate pieces mix with flour and ...


1

If you want to have the beautiful holes in the inside and the flaky layer in the outside here I'll give you some advice: Use high gluten flour. if you don't have the specific enviroment to grow the croissant you can put the croissants in a baking sheet and cover it loosely with plastic, so the croissant can grow freely. With the plastic we are making sure ...


1

You can achieve no. 3 Just make sure your is not that runny And mix your chopped up chocolate with a little bit of flour as this will prevent the chocolate from dropping to the bottom Then Pour half of your in the pan Then put in the chopped chocolate cover in flour Then pour the remaining batter And bake


1

At the end of the day, the controlling factor is the fat content in the meat, and its distribution. The overall percentage of fat is a good indicator of whether the cut will dry out or not, and its distribution, a means to determine if part of the cut will dry out, if for example, the fat is concentrated in parts of the meat. All three of your queries, i.e....


2

1) Chicken is a tough meat to cook right, in that it dries out very easily. A few too many minutes of cooking and you can go from a deliciously juicy piece of chicken to a dry and chalky piece of chicken. If you're newer to cooking chicken, I highly recommend using a meat thermometer and taking the meat off the heat about 5-10 degrees before the final ...


5

Fully submerged is going to be a problem, as you'd need an airlock to allow air to escape so you don't end up creating a pressure cooker. (which would prevent the bread from rising). If you were going to try this, I'd look into fermentation airlocks and grommets to install on a mason jar lid, and then use the largest straight-sided mason jar that I could ...


10

So normally, stove top cooking never results in all around heat like in an oven but what if you were to submerge (underwater bath instead of just around the sides) a dish in simmering water and then cover it completely (to prevent water from getting in) until it's cooked? This sounds a lot like sous vide which is currently becoming commonplace after having ...


16

Unlikely. Without even getting into the mechanics of how it would work, simple physics dictates that you can't get the temperature of this "immersion oven" above 100 degrees Celsius. Most cakes and breads are cooked at temperatures above 170 degrees Celsius. A second issue is that moisture can escape when baking in a normal oven. Your "immersion oven" would ...


2

It's certainly the cut and cooking method that are to blame. As others said, 150F is very, very low in an oven. But... ultimately will achieve a medium-well to well done piece of beef, which depending on the cut, may or may not be pleasant to eat. You may need to vary a higher temperature and a faster cooking time, or try different methods of preparing and ...


3

Without knowing the cut of meat, thickness, etc. it is very difficult to fully answer, but take a look at this chart for steaks: http://chicolockersausage.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/cook-a-steak-blue-rare-medium-welldone.jpg (Putting link, not pic in case of copyright issues.) To summarize though, a medium steak is about 135F and still has about 25% pink ...


0

Your oven is likely too hot, or you're starting with a cold batter. Make sure to start with a batter closer to room temperature and try reducing the oven temperature. Most ovens have hot spots or poor calibration, if you continue to have trouble pick up an over thermometer and check to see what the real temperature is at various spots.


1

May be the temperature of the oven was too high so the outer part got cooked too quickly leaving the inner cake raw.


3

I know this is an old question, but since I have been recently looking up the 'how to's' of ciabatta (which is how I came upon this question) I thought I'd pass on what I've picked up through recent reading and practice. Stretching the loaf out long-ways is an important stage of shaping a ciabatta, it seems. I imagine that everyone finds that the middle ...


1

If it can be done, it will make lots of difference. Different sourdough recipes are geared towards breeding different bacterial species, which give their own taste to the final product. There is no answer to "what will be a better choice". If you have a known good recipe for a starter using milk, then it is up to the eater to decide which result tastes ...


2

TL;DR: yes, use it. Many folks out there (my sweetie among them, so I hope she doesn't read this) claim to be able to detect an aftertaste of iodine in baked goods made with iodized salt. This is the primary reason we have non-iodized salt in the kitchen. The reason this is highly unlikely is that salt is generally only between 1-2% of the mass of baked ...


2

While the mixture is raw, the density of the batter is more or less equivalent to the density of the grated coconut, and the batter is fluid, allowing movement. During cooking, the egg protein in the batter denatures and coagulates, generating a dense colloidal matrix that doesn't allow movement. As this process is happening, the proteins are aggregating to ...


2

The interaction between the liquid and the cocoa during the blooming process and inside of the cupcake batter during baking is not the same. During blooming, there is only the liquid and the cocoa interacting in a free-flowing liquid matrix, and in the baking, both liquid and cocoa are trapped in a coloidal matrix. If you bloom before you add to the batter, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included