64

I'm rather surprised by the judgmental tone in some of the answers here. A well-done steak is a culinary preference; just because you don't share that preference is no reason to be rude about it. Some people like caviar; others don't, despite the fact that it is expensive and lauded by many "people in the know." Some people appreciate an espresso made ...


45

Why pizza/wood ovens, but not BBQ/smoker? Fire is not fundamentally a problem indoors; there are certainly safe ways to do it, like fireplaces. The things that make fire dangerous are lack of containment and lack of ventilation coupled with significant size. If it's at all uncontained, it's a fire hazard, and if there's not enough ventilation then you can ...


40

Oversalting is best dealt with by serious dilution. I'd make a large, not very meaty dish from it, with lots of vegetables, cooked for a while. Fry onions and other veg, add liquid, and stir in the cooked beef. But soaking the meat should help as well. Either soak in plain water and discard the water, or soak in something you might add to the sauce (wine, ...


34

Make a soup out of it! Dice the meat up, sweat some aromatics (onion, celery, etc.) in a pot, put in 1-2 liters of water, add the meat and let it come to a boil. Then, bring the heat down to a simmer and taste it. If it's still too salty, you can add more water and/or adjust more seasonings to balance it out with the other flavors. If it's still too ...


21

From a food safety point of view, no. There is no danger, because the meat contains no pathogens after overcooking. From a "healthy living" point of view, it might be a problem, because you can have created carcinogens by charring. But we don't discuss such topics here, because nobody in the world knows how much eating charred meat contributes to the risk ...


18

I would avoid "steak", which will dry out and become tough when cooked well done, and cook a cut of meat that is meant to be braised or grilled low and slow. That will mean that the cut has enough fat and collagen to break down, become tender, and remain moist.


16

If you don't fancy cooking in aluminium foil (kind of takes the point away), you need to make sure you have a super clean, extremely hot grill. Why? Clean (No tasty burnt fat from the burgers), flesh sticks like #### to a blanket. You can get away with it when cooking steaks because they are just so much stronger. So get a wire brush and clean an area for ...


16

Use raw potato. If the meat is already BBqued put in between layers of raw potato slices. Then reheat it [meat] by boiling it with whole potato, then for a short while put on preheated pan. If you want to remake it into some other dish add celery bulb in cut in quarters. It will work same as potatoes but will also add some sweetness that will counter ...


15

Use aluminum foil or even non-stick aluminum foil directly on the grate. You can use a fork to punch holes in it so that you get optimal smoke circulation if you like. The fish won't stick and clean-up is a breeze.


15

Harold McGee's "On Food and Cooking" has an interesting explanation on the chemistry of smoke (pg 448 on my edition). This is a summary of what it says: The three main component of wood are: Cellulose Hemicellulose Lignin (Source: Wikimedia) Cellulose and hemicellulose make up the "scaffold" of plant cells and ligning binds cells together. These three ...


15

Most of the popular ingredients for BBQ sauce (vinegar/ketchup/sugar etc.) tend not to mix very well together. I know whenever I've made BBQ sauce, placing all of the ingredients into a pan together they tend to separate and are difficult to combine. Heating up the ingredients, however, causes them to combine better, and after a short time cooking they will ...


14

A grill basket perhaps? I've no luck finding the term for your specific description, but that seems to be an umbrella term for utensils that basically hold something so you can more easily grill it.


13

The Maillard reaction occurs about 280 to 330 °F depending on the food. For meats this denaturing of the proteins also results in the release of water, so the meat gets hard and dry. By cooking at a "low" temperature, you cook at temperatures below which the Maillard reaction occurs. Well done beef has a resting temperature of 155 to 160 °F. So cooking at ...


12

The strongest wood is not always the best wood. Mesquite is by far the strongest smoke wood. But it can be a disaster on anything but beef or fast-cooked foods. Hickory is a good complement to barbecued pork, and is the traditional wood for Carolina barbecue. I like to use hickory and cherry with pulled pork and ribs, myself.


12

Don't worry about the pork contaminating the chicken, but rather vice versa. A good rule of thumb with chicken is to treat it as a biohazardius contaminant. Because it is. Salmonella is present IN chicken meat, unlike other meats where you will only find microbes on the surface. Your marinade doesn't seem particularly inhospitable to pathogen growth, so ...


12

Soaking wood chips accomplishes almost nothing, as proven here. Summary from amazing ribs link: Soaking wood does not work, as it takes more than days to saturate wood. And temperature measurements from wood soaked for a day show little change Their recommendation: have two containers of wood, one dry, and one covered with water (steam is required as well)....


12

This bugged me for a long time, and I assumed that there were better ways. And there are! Mostly notably you want to introduce the coals to more of your friend, Mr. Oxygen! Plight of firefighters everywhere and friend of blacksmiths, increased oxygen will start the coals much much faster. Three easy ways to accomplish this: Hairdryer! Just hook up your ...


11

Many people have strong opinions on when to apply a rub -- some say to allow at least a few hours and preferably overnight. Others literally apply it as they are putting them in the smoker/oven. Since people do it both ways and both claim to end up with terrific, moist ribs, whatever effect this might have is probably small. It may change aspects of the "...


11

Last time I did one it was an overnight proposition, sources I find recommend planning on 24 Hours for a 150lb Kalu-a-que. A pig roasted in the ground, Hawaiian or Kalua style, can take 12 hours if done right and if it is filled with fruits and vegetables it can take 16 hours or longer. If your pig is a purchased commercially (from a local farmer or ...


10

There are several studies linking foods cooked at high temperatures, and especially charred foods, to an increased risk of cancer. So far these studies have only been conducted on animals, so there is no conclusive proof that it has the same effect on humans, but as humans are animals, it would seem at least possible. The National Cancer Institute has a ...


10

No, it isn't possible to over soak wood chips, chunks, planks, or any other size that you want to throw on the grill (within reason, I wouldn't soak them for weeks because the water would get scummy). In fact, the directions given often grossly underestimate optimal soaking time. I assume this is because the manufacturer doesn't want to scare people off by ...


10

You can use any non-poisonous wood you like. Every wood has a different heat and smoke profile. "Soft woods" like birch will generally burn very hot for a short time, so OK for sausages, small meat cuts, and small vegetables, but not so good for large meat cuts, roasts, or for BBQ'ing covered for the full smoke effect as you will most likely need to re-...


10

Please, Please, Please do not try to do indoor smoking without equipment made for it. It is Dangerous! DANGEROUS Devices that use open flame inside your house take advantage of a chimney to let the smoke out. Pizza ovens are just funky shaped fireplaces. In a fireplace, the hot fire causes the smoke and nasty gasses to rise up the chimney, drawing in ...


9

Basically, what you need to do is create a baffle that distributes the smoke further into the main chamber. Checkout the mod #3 in this PDF for a CharGriller Smokin' Pro modification. http://www.deejayssmokepit.net/Downloads_files/CharGrilleMods.pdf You can do this same thing with tin foil if you're on the low budget plan.


9

You can save yourself the waste of making double, while preventing cross-contamination, by using one hand (clean) to scoop and sprinkle, and one hand (dirty) to direct the spice falling, pat/tamp, and rub the spices. Typically I begin by applying a "glue" (previously I have used honey and mustard, once I was vegan I went with just mustard; both worked well ...


9

From what I can tell you're generally on the right track here. From what you've said, there are probably just a few issues. tough/dry/rough. Believe it or not not cooking long enough could be the problem here. You want your brisket to get in that 190-200 range, this will cause the connective tissue to break down and make it very nice. The other possibility ...


9

I would look for cuts which can stand marination, and marinate them. Onglet (Hanger), Bavette, and Flank steak come to mind. The type of cut I'm thinking of tends to have a ropier texture, and be more highly-flavored, pungent, than the fine cuts. Still give them a high heat, to just well-done or slightly under, and give a longer resting time in an only-just ...


9

That cut of beef is OK for 'low and slow' however, you did not provide 'low and slow.' At 300, even wrapped, the internal temperature gets high enough that it will expel moisture. This is happening at the tissue/cellular level, so the wrapping won't stop that. The thing that could have helped is to keep it wrapped and let it cool to almost room temperature....


9

I BBQ whole fish or fish filets with or without skin quite regularly. You suspect the BBQ was too hot, but usually BBQs are not hot enough (unless you were REALLY hot and over like 800F?). Make sure grill is clean and apply oil to the grill and to the fish. Put fish skin side down on the BBQ until crispy and flip fish until cook to your desired temp. It ...


8

There are some sauce recipes where you need to thicken them to the point where they'd stay on whatever it is you're grilling. If you didn't cook them down, they'd have the consistency of a marinade, and just drip off. Sometimes you need to evaporate out some of the moisture, but other times you're actually creating chemical changes ... cooking sugar to a ...


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