New answers tagged

0

Recruit a friend. Of 20, presumably Canadians, someone must have a clue. Since this is explicitly a sausage party I am going to assume it is a he. You know who he is or maybe you will find out when the party starts. Have a couple of expensive beers set aside for that person. He will hopefully be proud to know that his expertise is recognized. He will ...


0

I think the basic foundation of your sauce is quite good. If it didn't come out the way you wanted it to come out, maybe the amounts of things you used were imbalanced. Personally, I wouldn't mind making your sauce and seeing how it works. But I'll see if I can "improve" your sauce by maybe mentioning a few add-ins. I'll put the stuff of your stuff included ...


2

I doubt you would find a significant difference as long as option 2 means placing the ribs on the pan and putting foil over the ribs...and, it was sealed tightly, but Meathead Goldwyn suggests wrapping the meat itself. The idea is that you are creating more of a braising environment. The wrap also significantly reduces evaporative cooling from the surface ...


6

Those are what you would refer to as "Hot Dogs" in American parlance. They can be heated by any means you deem suitable, including boiling, microwaving, baking, frying etc. They do however need to be heated fully before they are ready to consume. They commonly contain a lot of sugars, so burn readily on a grill if the grill is too hot or the hot dogs are ...


3

It's not necessary to poach sausage before BBQ-ing. If you afraid you might get not cooked in center and burned outside skin due to charcoal fire is hard to control or first do BBQ-ing as you mentioned, then poaching before BBQ-ing might be a good choice. At least you won't get any inedible foods. You could use toothpick to poke some holes or use knife to ...


1

On the grate. I have a gas grill. The wood (I use apple wood chunks) burns too fast if I put it down below the grate. I set a chunk (I like the big chunks) on the grill and leave it while the grill heats up. By cooking time usually it is smoldering and smoking on the edges and that is perfect for steaks, burgers, chicken etc. If the wood chunk is ...


2

Adding wood and allowing it to ignite is the proper procedure. You can do this with the cover on your grill so that it doesn't burn up too fast. You want the smoke to look bluish, rather than white, for the best flavor. When you see white smoke, the wood is not hot enough and you will get more acrid, less desirable flavors. You also don't need to see a ...


Top 50 recent answers are included