Hot answers tagged

91

Oh, those cooking myths! Whenever you think you have heard them all, there's a new one. In a yeasted dough, the yeast is perfectly fine with being tossed, beaten and generally mangled. The little yeast cells couldn't care less about what you do in the initial stage of mixing and kneading. (That's obviously different when you consider the dough after the ...


38

According to this article about Blumenthal's method, which also explains the other ingredient/method choices: https://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/07/dining/07curious.html The key to the Fat Duck batter is the alcohol, which does a couple of very useful things. It dissolves some of the gluten proteins in the wheat flour, so no elastic network forms and the crust ...


30

The primary use of beer in a beer batter is its alcohol, which disrupts gluten formation and needs less heat than water to evaporate, improving the texture of the final crust. For flavor, most recipes using beer do best with a malty, low-bitterness beer, like a marzen, scotch ale, or (maybe) amber ale. Highly-hopped "put hair on your chest" IPAs are a bad ...


22

Originally, before flour was as processed as it is now, sifting helped remove things like twigs and other contaminants. Sifting just helps remove clumped up dried ingredients (flour, powered sugar, etc, ) so that when you add in the wet ingredients you do not have to mix too hard to remove the clumps. Edit : When mixing the mixture too hard or too long you ...


20

There may be a few batters that are sensitive to shocks or loud noises, but most will not be (see Stephie's answer for more detail). In my household, the real reason for not beating the spoon was always clearly about protecting the dishes, not the food. Mixing bowls can chip, crack, or dent (depending on the material). If the bowl has a lid, then damage to ...


19

Besides the other answers that hold true for sifting individual ingredients, it will also help make the ingredients more evenly distributed if you sift them together. If I'm sifting, I'll typically place part of the flour in the sifter, then the smaller quantity items, then the rest of the flour, and sift them all together. This especially helps for ...


17

It is a compromise either way. Neither will be as good as freshly made, but both methods will work. As far as frozen batter, you will either need to plan ahead, or be willing to wait for it to thaw. If you go this route, I would suggest zip style freezer bags, and freeze flat, so that it will thaw more quickly. Also, some of the leavening power will be ...


16

You probably won't like this answer, but: Do what your recipe tells you to do. There are various methods to combine a set of ingredients and each will lead to a slightly different outcome. Drier or moister, lighter or denser... The "right" result will depend on the expectation of the recipe writer and can be the root of an eternal discussion: Compare the ...


13

It sounds like maybe there's a couple of possibilities. The pan is too hot. This can happen even over lower heat settings if you leave the pan to preheat for too long, or it may be that the burner's "medium-low" setting is just too hot, and you should use an even lower setting. The batter consistency is wrong. Crepe batter should be very thin, if it is ...


12

The key thing here is a substance called Lecithin and it is found in your Incredible, Edible Egg! Doing the adding of the egg one-by-one, plus a few other things are... in the service of creating a stable emulsion of liquid and fat in the batter. When this is done correctly, the cake will have a springy, even crumb, great flavor, and light texture. If the ...


11

I don't think the alcohol affects the tase in this kind of perparation. The point is to create surface of contact by using the gases in the beverage. Usually in restaurants that serves this kind of dish they use sparkling water or any cheap beer. And for a extra crispness you can add the batter into a whipped cream dispenser charged with CO2 cartridges ...


10

Put in on a stick. Depending on the size of the bar a toothpick may be sufficient. Just make sure the batter covers the stick a little where it goes into the bar.


9

Even though now a days most ingredients come quite sifted anyways and they don't usually have any other ingredient mixed by accident, it can still have lumps. It has sometimes happened to me that a cake (OR PANCAKES!) had like a bubble and inside some flour. Which is not the best flavour or texture when enjoying a nice cake or some pancakes with syrup! And ...


8

You can actually buy tools which help to spread batter. My sister got me a hot-plate crepe maker for Christmas the other year, which came with one of these: Which I find does the job perfectly! You should be able to find one online pretty easily or DIY one yourself. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhKFAlk-gtU


8

Powders are funny, chemically. The large surface area makes for some interesting effects. For one, adsorption of gases (oxygen, nitrogen) is rather fast and can be significant. Another is static electricity, which would be very annoying for the one tasked to mix the different powders. It also promotes (or disfavors) the formation of agglomerates, minuscule &...


7

Good Yorkshire pudding is not an art, it's a science. You need three things: Hot fat A hot oven Batter of the right consistency The only raising agent in Yorkshire Pudding is steam from the water in the liquid ingredients. You need to convert that water into steam fast to get a good rise, and you need the batter to crisp up quickly so it doesn't collapse. ...


7

What you are describing should not happen when using the right technique. I suspect this is happening because you are either lowering the battered food into the oil using the net, or your oil temperature is not hot enough to cook the batter before the food sinks to the bottom. The net is only for removing the food once it is cooked. Battered food should be ...


7

The baking powder undergoes a chemical reaction which produces small gas bubbles in the batter. The bubbles break up the batter coating (sort of like the geometry inside a sponge) so you wind up with a mass of little holes each surrounded by a thin layer of bready material, and it all fries up airy, light and crispy; instead of one thick, dense, hard shell ...


7

Another reason not named so far, that applies even to combinations of spoon and bowl/pot that are mechanically perfectly fine with hitting and vibration-insensitive contents: Not banging safes the nerves of everyone else in the house. Keep in mind that sound transmitted through solids travels surprisingly well and table or sink can act as sound board... So,...


7

First, this can indeed be a thick batter, as the other answers mentioned. I would recommend using Ruhlman's ratio of 1:2:2 flour to milk to egg as a starting point of what a good crepe batter should be like. You can experiment with other recipes if you want something nonstandard, but first do some batches to get a feel for the proper consistency. And don't ...


7

If your recipe is as given, you're making a crêpe, or something akin to it (as it's not risen). That's important here, I feel, as crêpes freeze much better than risen pancakes. The lack of a risen texture means one less thing to go wrong in the freezer. We freeze both kinds of pancakes for our children, and have had great success particularly with the ...


7

Dunk the tongs in the batter too, or use your fingers. It should just kind of seal itself then, as you let go. Watch an experienced traditional chip-shop owner putting the fish in*. Fish & fingers go in the batter, fish is gently laid in the fryer, fingers are kept cool by the batter. You never see any remaining finger-holes left in the batter by doing ...


6

As SAJ14SAJ mentioned, when doing a batter coating, you need to hold it in the oil for a second before letting it drop, so that it'll crust up before it touches the basket. However, you also mentioned 'with some zucchini slices on top', I suspect that the batter came off entirely. Breading for frying is a bit strange, as you need to make sure that you don'...


6

I use the coarse cornmeal because I like the flavor. I took my cue from the muffin recipe on the bag: It said to soak your cornmeal in the milk for 10 minutes. I did this for my buttermilk cornbread and it was delicious. I didn't add any extra milk.


6

Just as with kneading, stirring develops the gluten in the flour. over-mixing batter is a culinary no-no (fr. non-non). Batters are frequently rested in the refrigerator so the gluten can relax. Foods fried in batter that has been overworked and deprived of adequate rest is like a chef exposed to the same conditions–tough and tired. Whole wheat flour has ...


6

In many places cornflakes are very cheap, I am assuming where you are they are expensive because they are imported. You aren't going to be able to get the ridged structure without something like cornflakes because it's the flakes themselves that give the breading that texture. You need to find something that you can afford, perhaps another cereal that is ...


6

It's not that difficult to make flakes out of starch, if taste is not your major concern, as you are going to season and fry them and not eat with milk. All you need is flour of your choice and water. Take a skillet and fill it evenly with flour, the thickness of cornflakes. Sprinkle water over the flour, till the flour is just soaked with water. Do not ...


6

I have the an earlier model of this griddle, and have made hundreds of buckwheat crepes (galettes) on it, so here's some advice based on my own experience. Your answer is in your description: "After a lite greasing of the surface I pour the batter on and as soon as the batter hits the griddle the first problem begins which is an almost boiling of the batter....


5

I live in Seattle. I am 72+ years of age. I am from Chennai moved here in 1977. Dosai was my serious concern. I have tried all kinds of rices, American and imported, lower gluten higher gluten. In the end it comes to food is addiction and your favorite Dosai or the dosa form the restaurant is hard to duplicate at home. All one can do is come closer. long,...


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