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29

The primary use of beer in a beer batter is its alcohol, which disrupts gluten formation and needs less heat than water to evaporate, improving the texture of the final crust. For flavor, most recipes using beer do best with a malty, low-bitterness beer, like a marzen, scotch ale, or (maybe) amber ale. Highly-hopped "put hair on your chest" IPAs are a bad ...


13

It sounds like maybe there's a couple of possibilities. The pan is too hot. This can happen even over lower heat settings if you leave the pan to preheat for too long, or it may be that the burner's "medium-low" setting is just too hot, and you should use an even lower setting. The batter consistency is wrong. Crepe batter should be very thin, if it is ...


10

I don't think the alcohol affects the tase in this kind of perparation. The point is to create surface of contact by using the gases in the beverage. Usually in restaurants that serves this kind of dish they use sparkling water or any cheap beer. And for a extra crispness you can add the batter into a whipped cream dispenser charged with CO2 cartridges ...


8

You can actually buy tools which help to spread batter. My sister got me a hot-plate crepe maker for Christmas the other year, which came with one of these: Which I find does the job perfectly! You should be able to find one online pretty easily or DIY one yourself. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhKFAlk-gtU


7

First, this can indeed be a thick batter, as the other answers mentioned. I would recommend using Ruhlman's ratio of 1:2:2 flour to milk to egg as a starting point of what a good crepe batter should be like. You can experiment with other recipes if you want something nonstandard, but first do some batches to get a feel for the proper consistency. And don't ...


6

I have the an earlier model of this griddle, and have made hundreds of buckwheat crepes (galettes) on it, so here's some advice based on my own experience. Your answer is in your description: "After a lite greasing of the surface I pour the batter on and as soon as the batter hits the griddle the first problem begins which is an almost boiling of the batter....


5

There are several considerations. First off, anything you deep fry will take on a different flavor. I can attest specifically to hops in beer batter tasting wildly different and, in my and my dinner guest's opinions, disgusting. I would likewise be concerned with a heavier malt like a porter or stout. Flavoring is really not the responsibility of the beer ...


4

Get an ISI whipper (no affiliation), the model that can take both hot and cold. It accepts CO2 or N2O. They have multiple safety controls built in, are versatile (especially given your interest in Heston), come in multiple sizes, and are relatively easy to clean.


3

It sounds like the griddle might be too heavily greased. You actually want the crepe to stick to the griddle at first, to help the batter spread. (Later, the dehydration and starch gelling causes the crepe to shrink slightly and release from the griddle.) If it's floating on oil from the very beginning, it'll just come along with the spreader.


2

Generally with a 1L siphon it’s advised to use 2 or 3 charges. If you scale down your ingredients, you’ll create a much larger gap in the canister, this would mean you’d have to use even more charges which is not really safe at all! If you’d like to scale down your recipe, you should also scale down your canister size too. Try using 0.25 or 0.5 liter ...


1

The beer batter works because of the alcohol and the CO2 in beer. Bitter flavours aren't really welcome there. For that effect, I recommend using carbonated water with vodka. You just get sparkling alcoholic water that way, without any of the flavours in beer that I don't think are suitable for battered fish. If you do like a beer-like flavor with your ...


1

Higher heat, thinner batter, and don't put it in the fridge. No tools necessary. I recommend thin non-stick pans, and a gas stove. The batter should be thin enough it basically spreads itself, as soon as it hits a pan hot enough to totally 'melt' it. The only reason to swirl it is to circularize it. It should be a consistency that you could drink without ...


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