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13

No, you don't need to soak fresh shell beans. Unlike their dried counterparts, shelling beans don't need a soak before using. Most fresh shelling beans require from 20 to 30 minutes to cook The Spruce Eats I'm not sure where they got the idea that most fresh shell beans take 20-30 minutes. You'll find recipes that vary from 10 to 60 minutes of cooking ...


13

It worked phenomenally! I quick-released my stew ~5 minutes earlier than usual, added the frozen beans (no extra water needed- the beans were just covered by the liquid) pressure cooked on high for 7 minutes then allowed to release naturally. The beans were buttery but totally intact. Would recommend.


12

I see instructions for pressure cooked frozen butter beans, which call for 4 minutes at high pressure, followed by about 10 minutes of natural pressure release. So, I would certainly add them at the end. Fresh beans (or frozen) don't absorb a lot of liquid, and you can certainly add more liquid to thin afterward.


5

I use a slow cooker almost every time I cook dried beans, and I don't recommend cutting down on soaking. I typically soak overnight (with a little bicarbonate of soda), and start cooking in the morning, so 10-12 hours soaking + 8-12 hours cooking, avoiding adding (much) acid/salt until towards the end. It's possible your beans soften more easily than mine, ...


5

In my experience, a 400 gram can of beans contains about 240 grams of drained beans. That will vary slightly by the type of bean.


5

The main reason why you rinse lentils and beans is to remove debris or shriveled lentils. Also for hygiene reasons, depending on where and what lentils you bought, they might include little stones, sand, or dust. In general, if you don't rinse your lentils/beans they will foam more while cooking. The foam is caused by starch and denatured protein from the ...


3

Yes to both questions. Lentils and barley can go together quite well in a soup. Here's a recipe for a lentil and barley soup as an example. Compare it to your soup recipe to see if there are any major differences (especially in cooking time or liquid to barley/lentil ratios). My hunch is that the barley will absorb more liquid than the lentils, so you may ...


3

The soak doesn't swell them to 'cooked' level; the cooking does that. It is true that very old beans will never be tender, but you have no good way to find that out before you spend the next two hours simmering them. [Change the water first & don't salt them until the last half hour]. This covers most of the basics, over several methods - How to Cook ...


2

When citrus juice is added to a soup or sauce, it's usually added at the last minute, after cooking. The reason is that when citrus juice is cooked, it looses some of its flavor. As Juhasz mentioned, dried beans should not be cooked with acid. Acid will make them take a lot longer to cook. It may also make the skins tough and unpleasant to eat. (Unless you ...


2

I have gotten away with no soak many times. I often cook beans overnight. I think if you cook for 6 hours + the beans are so soft that soaking in advance does not make much difference. Usually for long cooks I use kidney, red, pinto, turtle beans or black eyed peas. Even with those tough beans and no soak about half have become mush by the end. I have ...


2

I have finally found a solution to the frothing issue in the USDA recommendations for canning legumes. In addition to soaking the beans (they add salt to the soak water), par-boil them in plain water for about 15 minutes. Drain the water, then add fresh water to the jars. I am not sure if it is the fact that they add salt to the soak water or the par-...


1

It's not what I would call a well-written recipe. Also, a slight variation in the amount of beans will probably not be a big deal for the final prouct. However, given the information you provide, I would suggest that in this case a "can" refers to your 398ml can. Use them all.


1

As far as I can tell, the majority of bean leaves are edible raw or cooked. They don't become unsafe, but likely become more fibrous as they mature. In this case, cooking would make eating them more pleasurable. Here are some possible uses. Here is an edit based on the comment of @FuzzyChef, below. I had not considered the potential impact of ...


1

I would not expect it to work well. It might not even work at all. Nuts are very oily, relatively difficult to crush, and when crushed do not immediately become powder, but tend to require extended pressure and grinding to reduce them to a paste. Once pasted, they need to be pushed out of the machine with some force. Presumably the Hampton Farms grinder ...


1

My mung beans also always turn brown before it's fully cooked. I never tried blanching them though. It's the way of preserving colors in cooking. But I never even heard of blanching Legumes. I might give it a try though. Hot water/Cold water shock in the beginning, and then the rest of cooking. We'll see..


1

Been eating and cooking blackeye peas for over 30 years and yes, the water turning brown is quite normal. Still enjoying them.


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