New answers tagged

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It is important that after "frying" the flour and fat you turn off the heat and add the first liquid (water, stock, milk) slowly while stirring. Later you can add liquid more quickly and turn the heat back on. In common with the other answers: this avoids clumps. I sometimes make a roux from peanut butter, flour, spices, milk, water. Yummie. Without the ...


33

This link explains the science behind what is known as "the mother sauce", béchamel. Essentially, the steps of first creating a roux, then adding cold milk, are about manipulating the glucose chains in the flour. Done correctly, the sauce is smooth and flavorful. Done incorrectly and you have a grainy mixture that tastes of raw flour. @David Richerby's ...


8

It's very difficult to just mix flour with a liquid. It will set to the bottom of the sauce pan and clump when heated, unless you stir constantly. This is why you make a roux first, combining the flour with some kind of fat. You could just mix flour with cold butter until well combined and add it to hot liquid such as milk and it would thicken just fine (I ...


14

Flour has to be cooked in any kind of fat, butter or oil to remove the rawness of the flour. If you don't roast and put all the ingredients straightway and cook for longer time, it would still work, but in that case you'll have to cook for bit longer and reduce the ratio of flour. Otherwise the sauce will thicken up and it would taste raw as it wasn't cooked....


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