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16

Different countries can have very different names for their cuts of meat, and in some cases, there isn't an obvious/direct equivalent from a French cut to an American or English cut. If you look at a French butcher's diagram, you'll see the lines and cuts don't correspond directly to a US diagram. I believe that what you saw labeled as "plat nerveux" is ...


10

In general, when a recipe says 'discard,' it means that the part to be discarded is not to be used in the scope of the recipe. I see no reason why you couldn't save the beef fat for other recipes, it can be refrigerated for about a week or frozen for 2-3 months. See this answer for tips on using the reserved fat. The sinew I would probably just toss. ...


9

I am not a doctor, and this is not medical advice--just my view of the current best practices recommended by sources I trust. It depends on the kind of bacteria or parasites commonly found on the food in question. Chickens are often infected with Campylobacter or Salmonella, and those bacteria can get into the flesh of the meat. So cooking chicken ...


8

That is a type of protein and connective tissue. Mainly you have collagen and elastin in a cut of meat. Collagen turns into gelatin through heating and melts away. The elastin will get softened. I believe what you’re seeing is the elastin.


7

The main differences: Bourguignon is made with a red wine from the Burgundy (Bourgogne) region. Daube is a southern dish, from provence/languedoc, and would typically be made with a richer red (occasionally, and originally, white) wine from that region Bourguignon is almost always garnished with small onions, carrots, mushroom and bacon, nothing else. Daube,...


7

From your description- maybe its a hanging tender also called butchers cut. It's the muscle that supports the heart. Long (9-20 inches), cylindrical, no bones and very red like a liver or heart. May have a lot of silver skin if the butcher didn't clean it. Normally its costs mid range for beef. I can find it for $8-12 depending on the age. Tastes like a ...


6

It is common, when preparing pho, to add raw, thinly sliced beef to the piping hot broth. That way the broth essentially cooks the beef. So what you received is not surprising. It is impossible to know, from what you have written, if there are safety concerns. IF the beef was handled correctly at the restaurant, and IF you received and cooked the beef ...


6

You can cook meat products in a microwave, and be safe, but you need to make sure they're fully cooked. Microwave ovens vary a lot in both their power output and how evenly they cook, so 2 minutes may not really be enough to be certain of cooking thoroughly. Next time I suggest you cut it in half when you think it's done, and check that the middle is both ...


6

Grass-fed beef will have yellow fat rather than the white fat of grain-fed beef. This is because of the beta-carotene in the grass, apparently.


5

Straining might work, but you may need to use a process known as "decanting": Let the stock sit until any sediment falls to the bottom. Remove the good liquid, avoiding the sediment at the bottom. You can do this a few ways : Use something to scoop the good liquid off the top Use a hose to siphon off the good liquid until just before you get to the ...


5

It's the tomato paste. Many brands of tomato paste can have a bitter, almost metallic flavor if it isn't fried off first. I don't use it in crock pot recipes for that very reason unless I saute it in some oil for a minute before adding it. You can add some sugar but that doesn't counteract the bitterness. Also you are adding too much of it, 2 tbsp for 1 ...


5

On a quick glance, one might easily confuse one with the other, but if you take a closer look, there are some subtle and not-so-subtle differences. You may want to consider that the method of “sear meat pieces in pot, cover with liquid (wine, in this case), let simmer until meat is tender” is a quite generic method of cooking certain pieces of meat. But ...


5

To answer the question you asked There are differences in flavor. There is no way to explain to you how grass fed beef should taste, since almost nobody has the skill to "read" a taste from a verbal description (proffessional tasters have a system, and the training to use it, which comes close to it). But if you taste both side-by-side, and concentrate on ...


4

You made 2 mistakes. A pressure cooker (like InstaPot) relies on water to make steam to create pressure. You should not put a roast in the pressure cooker without adding liquid. A pressure cooker is ideal for breaking down collagen in cheap, tough cuts of meat to make them tender. NY Strip is a premium cut that is already tender - just roast it in the ...


4

Searing frozen meat is fine, and is a useful way to get a good sear without overcooking the inside (since you can sear for longer, and at a lower temperature). There are no food safety issues I can think of which would apply to short ribs but not steaks, particularly since the former are cooked for longer at a higher internal temperature. The only problem I ...


4

As Raditz_35 mentioned in his comment you prepare the meat in different way than you want to. Yes, in curry and stew/gulash you use low quality (it's not actually low quality per se, it's just more dense and more chewy onto itself) meat. And then you STEW the meat for few hours. You try to fry it for few minutes. If you want to have a stir-fry you need to ...


4

Here is what some will definitely label a biased description of aging and packing that might help a bit. It goes into the difference between wet and dry aging and gas packing which has become more common. My description of dry aging, and wet aging for that matter, and how I was taught to think of it is that it is decay, but controlled. Enzyme action ...


4

When in doubt, throw it out. There are three main indicators to spoiled beef: Texture: beef becomes slimy as it spoils. Color: beef will go gray as it spoils, BUT, it will also go gray due to it oxidizing. This makes it a somewhat unreliable measure without the other indicators. Smell: as beef spoils it will start to smell sour. Note that you did mention ...


3

This is a product of the cut more than of the animal. You're comparing shank with steak, which are two very different cuts. In general, to get a tender cut with high temperature cooking you want a cut with lots of fat and connective tissue to render. Leaner cuts will become dry and tough. The shank is a cut you could also get from a cow, so you could ...


3

A chuck steak is simply cut into slices more ideal for grilling whereas a roast is left in larger thicker shapes more ideal for roasting. Once you break them down into stew shape either is viable.


3

To have the most flavor, you will need to roast/brown the meat scraps. Let them get a nice brown color. you could add aromatic vegetables (onion, carrots, celery) as well to the roasting pan.


3

Food safety wise, as long as you keep the food above 50C it should be fine. However, due to the nature of the BW, you’ll probably end up having a very soggy pastry if you do so. Refrigeration is an option: Depending on if you will you pre-cook or just sear the loin: If you pre-cook, you’d normally want the pastry to crisp as quick as possible, and then ...


3

You'll probably never be able to divorce the problems with beef from what you love about it. The suggestions below may help, but in general "replacing" beef is probably more work than just eating other stuff. If you find that nothing quite romances your tastebuds the way beef does, try tripling the amount of garlic, cumin, soy-sauce or whatever other spaces ...


3

If you are loving cows in particular, because they are nice and give us milk, you could substitute some other hooved animal. I cannot really tell the difference between farmed bison and beef. You can get bison meat in a lot of grocery stores now. Venison or elk can be ordered from specialty groceries and also have that serious meat taste. Or maybe you ...


2

Yes. You may want to baste from time to time if there's little fat, and ribeye benefits from lower and slower cooking--which you pretty much seem to have here--but otherwise yes. You may wish to check out Ad Hoc at Home, by Thomas Keller, which discusses roasting a ribeye.


2

The short answer to your question is simply, “No, eating ‘not very well cooked beef’ will not be harmful to you.” That said, there are a few mitigating factors that should be considered. Bacteria like to live on the surface of beef, so on cuts like roasts or steaks having it not cooked all the way through (so it would be pink to red, varying degrees of “...


2

The Beef Heel of Round represents a cut from the beef round immediately above the hock. This roast is composed of many small muscle groups, has a lot of seam fat, and is one of the least tender cuts of beef. Braising for long periods of time works best for that cut. Bottom round is rump roast and the top part furthest away from the hock. Source: https://...


1

It would be possible to come up with a protocol to do this safely, however the more time that meat spends in the so-called thermal danger zone the more you need to thoroughly cook it at the end. It's hard to understand what you would be gaining by doing this.


1

Hmm, what are other veggies you ad? Or only canned tomatoes? I usually add a spoonful (teaspoon) of sugar to around 1 cup of tomato sauce. Sometimes less when using sweet peppers. You can try to salvage with adding sugar (just slowly). If you oversweet use vinegar to balance the taste. Cabernet is definitely a wine you should balance with something sweet ...


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