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10

In general, when a recipe says 'discard,' it means that the part to be discarded is not to be used in the scope of the recipe. I see no reason why you couldn't save the beef fat for other recipes, it can be refrigerated for about a week or frozen for 2-3 months. See this answer for tips on using the reserved fat. The sinew I would probably just toss. ...


9

I am not a doctor, and this is not medical advice--just my view of the current best practices recommended by sources I trust. It depends on the kind of bacteria or parasites commonly found on the food in question. Chickens are often infected with Campylobacter or Salmonella, and those bacteria can get into the flesh of the meat. So cooking chicken ...


8

That is a type of protein and connective tissue. Mainly you have collagen and elastin in a cut of meat. Collagen turns into gelatin through heating and melts away. The elastin will get softened. I believe what you’re seeing is the elastin.


7

The main differences: Bourguignon is made with a red wine from the Burgundy (Bourgogne) region. Daube is a southern dish, from provence/languedoc, and would typically be made with a richer red (occasionally, and originally, white) wine from that region Bourguignon is almost always garnished with small onions, carrots, mushroom and bacon, nothing else. Daube,...


7

It is used. It's almost hard to avoid in Florence: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lampredotto If the question is, why is this stomach used less frequently than other stomachs, I have no idea.


6

Grass-fed beef will have yellow fat rather than the white fat of grain-fed beef. This is because of the beta-carotene in the grass, apparently.


6

Just a note, a pet peeve of mine and something that may help you feel better, that red liquid is not blood. It is Myoglobin, a protein that found only in muscle. Blood tends to spoil very rapidly and meat which was not properly drained of blood will typically spoil or at least taste unlike what you want. Myoglobin however as it ages is what helps give aged ...


6

Very doable, you just have to fool around with them a little. Watch the meat carefully, and check the internal temperature in several pieces with a meat thermometer, as they're heating. If you're concerned about a hot spot in the oven, you can rotate the pan every couple of minutes. Pull from the oven once they've reached serving temp. Remember they'll ...


6

It is common, when preparing pho, to add raw, thinly sliced beef to the piping hot broth. That way the broth essentially cooks the beef. So what you received is not surprising. It is impossible to know, from what you have written, if there are safety concerns. IF the beef was handled correctly at the restaurant, and IF you received and cooked the beef ...


5

If the recipe said to simmer them slowly with the meat, you might be pleasantly surprised as they could blend in with the other flavors. (Or not, but it might be worth a try with a smaller amount.) But in the given recipe, a not-so-small amount gets added shortly before the end of the cooking time, which seems intended to keep the original olive flavor (a ...


5

On a quick glance, one might easily confuse one with the other, but if you take a closer look, there are some subtle and not-so-subtle differences. You may want to consider that the method of “sear meat pieces in pot, cover with liquid (wine, in this case), let simmer until meat is tender” is a quite generic method of cooking certain pieces of meat. But ...


5

Straining might work, but you may need to use a process known as "decanting": Let the stock sit until any sediment falls to the bottom. Remove the good liquid, avoiding the sediment at the bottom. You can do this a few ways : Use something to scoop the good liquid off the top Use a hose to siphon off the good liquid until just before you get to the ...


5

It's the tomato paste. Many brands of tomato paste can have a bitter, almost metallic flavor if it isn't fried off first. I don't use it in crock pot recipes for that very reason unless I saute it in some oil for a minute before adding it. You can add some sugar but that doesn't counteract the bitterness. Also you are adding too much of it, 2 tbsp for 1 ...


5

To answer the question you asked There are differences in flavor. There is no way to explain to you how grass fed beef should taste, since almost nobody has the skill to "read" a taste from a verbal description (proffessional tasters have a system, and the training to use it, which comes close to it). But if you taste both side-by-side, and concentrate on ...


4

When in doubt, throw it out. There are three main indicators to spoiled beef: Texture: beef becomes slimy as it spoils. Color: beef will go gray as it spoils, BUT, it will also go gray due to it oxidizing. This makes it a somewhat unreliable measure without the other indicators. Smell: as beef spoils it will start to smell sour. Note that you did mention ...


4

Here is what some will definitely label a biased description of aging and packing that might help a bit. It goes into the difference between wet and dry aging and gas packing which has become more common. My description of dry aging, and wet aging for that matter, and how I was taught to think of it is that it is decay, but controlled. Enzyme action ...


4

As Raditz_35 mentioned in his comment you prepare the meat in different way than you want to. Yes, in curry and stew/gulash you use low quality (it's not actually low quality per se, it's just more dense and more chewy onto itself) meat. And then you STEW the meat for few hours. You try to fry it for few minutes. If you want to have a stir-fry you need to ...


4

Stew meat is generally from tough cuts. Meat is tough because of collagen, which takes time to break down into gelatin, and gelatin gives a luscious mouth feel. The meat will get up to temperature and stay there for hours, the way tell it is done is with a fork - if it falls apart it's done.


4

Yes, it is a NY strip. The "strip loin" is like two feet+ long and at least 3/4 of it is what you're used to seeing. The last four or so steaks include an additional muscle or two at the "top." You got those last few steaks. (SOURCE: I'm a butcher ;)


4

Searing frozen meat is fine, and is a useful way to get a good sear without overcooking the inside (since you can sear for longer, and at a lower temperature). There are no food safety issues I can think of which would apply to short ribs but not steaks, particularly since the former are cooked for longer at a higher internal temperature. The only problem I ...


3

I'd put it in the smoker low&slow until the desired internal temperature is reached (minus some degrees, depending on the size of the meat), then brown it in a hot pan.


3

Your closest substitute will be pineapple, either juice or puree, which is much more widely available worldwide than green papaya. Papaya contains a natural tenderizer called papain; pineapple contains a different one called bromelain. While the actions of the two fruit-based tenderizers won't be exactly the same, they will be very similar. Plus both will ...


3

Silverside is one of those cuts that varies a lot, I've had topsides and silversides that came out reasonably tender and juicy, and I've had ones where I need power tools to cut them, even when I do everything right. They're cuts I avoid as a result. Silverside is a cut that comes from the rear of the animal, it doesn't have much marbling and does a fair ...


3

Heating it up should not cause the meat to toughen that much. One thing you could do is slightly under cook the meat ?


3

This is a product of the cut more than of the animal. You're comparing shank with steak, which are two very different cuts. In general, to get a tender cut with high temperature cooking you want a cut with lots of fat and connective tissue to render. Leaner cuts will become dry and tough. The shank is a cut you could also get from a cow, so you could ...


3

A chuck steak is simply cut into slices more ideal for grilling whereas a roast is left in larger thicker shapes more ideal for roasting. Once you break them down into stew shape either is viable.


3

To have the most flavor, you will need to roast/brown the meat scraps. Let them get a nice brown color. you could add aromatic vegetables (onion, carrots, celery) as well to the roasting pan.


2

The short answer to your question is simply, “No, eating ‘not very well cooked beef’ will not be harmful to you.” That said, there are a few mitigating factors that should be considered. Bacteria like to live on the surface of beef, so on cuts like roasts or steaks having it not cooked all the way through (so it would be pink to red, varying degrees of “...


2

Yes. You may want to baste from time to time if there's little fat, and ribeye benefits from lower and slower cooking--which you pretty much seem to have here--but otherwise yes. You may wish to check out Ad Hoc at Home, by Thomas Keller, which discusses roasting a ribeye.


1

Totally agree with GdG about too much tomato paste. But I'd also say cabernet is too heavy a wine. And what else are you putting in there? A regular beef stew would have a lot of onions, which sweeten the pot a lot, especially if you pre-saute them as you really should to develop taste. Carrots are another traditional sweet vegetable. I think you may be ...


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