New answers tagged

0

Is the supermarket meat packaged in a gas-filled plastic thing, and the butcher's isn't? If yes, that might be the cause: that gas is there to keep the meat looking red and fresh, so people will buy it. It also has the effect of making the meat look cooked much more quickly than it actually is. This is probably not a problem for steaks but it's dangerous for ...


2

Topside is a good cut of beef for slowly braising, which is what you're doing here. I assume you're following a recipe that calls for 2 hours of cooking? Many recipes for braised meat dishes tend to understate the amount of time it needs to be cooked to become tender (just like how they will tell you you can caramelise onions in 20 minutes). 2 hours is a ...


6

If your beef has honest-to-goodness blood in it, complain to your butcher. More likely, what you're seeing/tasting is myoglobin, which does have a bit of a metallic taste when it's not cooked. You can get rid of this in two main ways: osmosis and heat. So here's how to do that. Dry brine it. Put the beef on a drying rack set on a paper-towel-lined baking ...


1

Going to a butcher is a very good idea, and doing some of your own butchering on larger cuts is a great way to save money and get really good quality meat. It's not a question of butcher versus supermarket though, the factors that make a difference in cooking time are: Cut: The word steak is a generic term for a small cut of meat cut across the muscle ...


0

Pepperoni is usually higher in salt content. Just compare the salt content of typical burger patty meat with the salt content of a typical pepperoni meat: Burger patty (100g) - 74 mg Pepperoni (100g) - 1,761 mg As you can see, pepperoni has about 20 times the amount of salt in burger patties, so if you decided to make a burger patty out of pepperoni, the &...


4

to answer the primary question, yes you could, but pepperoni is already cooked and processed and is hard (dried),it's easy to eat in small thin slices, but not in big chucks. You could try grinding it down again and find a way to bind it in a patty (egg?breadcrumbs?) but the final texture might be weird, pepperoni is also usually quite strong in taste and ...


3

If the patties are just ground beef, then use them the same way you'd use any other ground beef; pull it apart with your hands or break it up with a spoon or spatula in the pot. It may be that your burgers include other ingredients for flavour, in which case those other ingredients will also be in whatever you make, but they shouldn't significantly affect ...


0

Simple. Lack of seasoning. Add salt before cooking as well as seasoning. Be liberal with the salt, and don't use table salt, use a salt grinder. The burgers will not be bland. Gordon Ramsay takes this to another level, he even seasons the lettuce. Look up the video on youtube. That's a bit over the top, but the fact is that it's only bland due to lack of ...


0

There is no way to prevent water loss beyond what you have done. This is one of the reasons why freshness is so important. You either freeze the meat immediately (which alters the texture) or store refrigerated and lose some moisture over time. Fresh meat combined with an adequate resting period after cooking are the two biggest contributors to juicy, well ...


2

You can't prevent it, that's how it works. It will always lose some liquid, no matter what. This is why supermarkets sell packaged meat with "diapers" on the bottom. As mentioned in comments, you can buy dry aged beef. It has already lost that moisture, so you won't have the liquid to deal with, if that bothers you. This doesn't mean, of course, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included