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29

The primary use of beer in a beer batter is its alcohol, which disrupts gluten formation and needs less heat than water to evaporate, improving the texture of the final crust. For flavor, most recipes using beer do best with a malty, low-bitterness beer, like a marzen, scotch ale, or (maybe) amber ale. Highly-hopped "put hair on your chest" IPAs are a bad ...


24

N2O is more stable than CO2. Mixing N2O with water or cream won't create diffetent molecules. If the liquid you add N2O is not very thick (as water) the gas and liquid will separate in two. If it is thick, as with cream, the gas will get trapped in it. You can see the proccess with more detail in this question. CO2 reacts with water (H2O) making H2CO3 (...


23

As noted above, reducing the liquid through evaporation will thicken up the chili but you run the risk of burning/scorching the bottom and it can take a long time at lower temperatures. What I like to do is to take some of the beans (I prefer black beans in mine) and mash them up into a thick paste and then stir that into the chili. The starches from the ...


22

I can think of several reasons why you might salt beer: Salt is a natural flavor enhancer, so you'd be able to taste the hops and malt more Salt reduces perceived bitterness, so overly hopped beer would taste less bitter The salt crystals may nucleate bubble formation, giving the beer more head (briefly) I've heard of it being done before, but never with ...


17

I use instant Corn Masa Flour as thickener. It seems to hold onto water better over time than does corn meal. That's likely because unlike corn meal, it's precooked, nixtamalized. Either way, you'll get a bit of a corny taste.


14

My main concern (would have been) BPA, as most cans nowadays are coated with BPA plastics inside to protect flavor. Cooks Illustrated evaluated the BPA leeched into chicken using this method: Beer can interiors are coated with an epoxy that contains Bisphenol A (BPA). Is the popular method of cooking a chicken perched on an open beer can really a ...


13

I add beer to my chili and simply let it simmer with the lid off for an hour or two so the liquid evaporates. I've never had a problem with overcooking.


13

There are circumstances where working in a hot place will make people sweat so much that they need to take salt to avoid a deficiency. I first heard mention of this from a man who had been doing field work in the Blue Mountains of Queensland, then found out more when working in a metal foundry, after which I worked in a factory where salt tablets were made. ...


12

Indeed, Mr. Zable actually applied for a patent -- US application no. 0014320, filed Sept 13, 2010. (Of course, just because he applied doesn't mean the US Patent Office will issue a patent on it.) His process is, in essence: (1) gelling a liquid beverage; and (2) wraping an aliquot of the gel in a raw "farinaceous dough", selected from the group of ...


11

It will produce the same effect, however it might alter the taste (depending on the type of beer), and will almost certainly alter the color of the final product, as beer contains sugars that will increase browning.


10

If you want to thicken it fast use flour, just don't add it directly to the pot (If you do, the flour will clump and you'll spend the next couple of hours trying to de-clump the clumps). Use a bowl. To the bowl, add 1-2 tablespoons of flour and a cup of hot liquid from the chili. Mix/whisk both until combined. Add this mixture to your chili and stir until ...


10

As other answers have noted, salt enhances flavor and reduces perceived bitterness. It also increases the perceived body/mouthfeel of the beer. My grandfather always salted his cantaloupe and honeydew melons. I tried it, and was pleasantly surprised by how it intensified the melon flavor. Also of note is Gose, a style of beer brewed in Leipzig, Germany. It ...


10

I don't think the alcohol affects the tase in this kind of perparation. The point is to create surface of contact by using the gases in the beverage. Usually in restaurants that serves this kind of dish they use sparkling water or any cheap beer. And for a extra crispness you can add the batter into a whipped cream dispenser charged with CO2 cartridges ...


9

I don't like using masa flour as it affects both texture and flavor. I have come up with some less conventional ways to thicken chili that work: Brisket torn into small pieces. Buy some pre-cooked from your local BBQ house, remove the crunchy and fatty parts, and tear the rest into very small pieces. These bitty brisket bits will fill the voids and make ...


9

The release of aromatics is most certainly part of the reason for producing a head when pouring beer. You're creating a buildup of bubbles that contain carbonated gas coming out of solution; that gas can carry aromatic particles created during the brewing process. The more there are, the more aroma is released. The "cap" theory is pretty dubious, on the ...


8

Cans have a lot of advantages over bottles: they don't allow light in (light spoils beer), are easier to stack (and take up less space when arranged tightly), the materials for each can are cheaper, and so on. From the consumer perspective, this results in cheaper and higher-quality beer, all else being equal. The reason craft breweries have been using ...


8

You can easily replace the liquid in most bread recipes with beer. This can have a very pronounced effect on your final dough as there is a lot more chemical and biological fun happening in beer than there is in water. In my experience, the dough with beer will usually rise faster than a similar dough with water. Generally, the flavor difference won't be ...


8

It really depends on the level of seasoning of your cast iron. If you see a really nice sheen all throughout your pan, I'd say you are good to go. The acidity of tomatoes, beer, wine, etc is problematic when the acid reacts directly with the iron. However, the seasoning on a well seasoned cast iron pan will act as a layer between the iron and the acid. ...


8

I suspect that the word intended was "capsicum". 2 ounces of chili pepper would be reasonable given the amounts of other spices. 2 ounces of capsaicin would be difficult to source and would make the beer essentially inedible.


7

Beef broth would be what I would go with if I had to substitute beer in chili. While obviously not the same, it still has a rich flavor that should hold up well.


7

This is a little speculative but too much of an answer for a comment. We've had a few discussions here about the relative rates of boiling off water and alcohol. The result is that the alcohol vapour (starting from even pure beer/wine) will be mixed with quite a lot of water vapour so will be dilute even before it mixes with air. Apparently you need ...


6

The advertised reason is that the alcohol will cut some of the protein chains resulting in a fondue that is dippable and not so stringy. Obviously the alcoholic beverage of choice will also add a lot of cheese-compatible flavor as well. Fondue recipes that don't include alcohol universally call for acid to achieve a similar effect.


6

Depending on whether you'd consider this a compromise (I consider it a feature), corn meal or crushed tortilla chips not only thicken it but also add a flavor that usually complements the chili.


6

I've seen some of the usual answers like ground tortilla chips (unsalted if you can find them), and masa harina, but potato flakes (the instant ones in a box) are a great way to thicken your chili (or any soup). You can also do a quick cornstarch slurry by mixing a tablespoon of water and a tablespoon of corn starch and add as needed. Always add either of ...


6

Zach makes a good case for the benefits of cans over bottles...but there are just as many benefits of bottles over cans. In general, I'd say that, if the beer is kept out of the light, bottles are a better choice as far as flavor is concerned. For one, glass is completely nonreactive, and does not contaminate the beer, but aluminum does leech into the beer,...


6

As SAJ14SAJ mentioned, when doing a batter coating, you need to hold it in the oil for a second before letting it drop, so that it'll crust up before it touches the basket. However, you also mentioned 'with some zucchini slices on top', I suspect that the batter came off entirely. Breading for frying is a bit strange, as you need to make sure that you don'...


6

Hobgoblin is a dark brown ale and would work just fine as a replacement for Newcastle Nut Brown Ale for cooking purposes. Newcastle is more widely available than Hobgoblin, so is often used in recipes, but at the end of the day, any decent brown ale will do.


6

IPA, especially these days, tends to have high bitterness...40 - 60 IBUs in general...often much higher. Your biggest issue would be whether or not the bitterness would significantly influence the flavor or your bread. As far as the rise, as is mentioned in the comments above, active yeast in the beer may or may not be a factor. You could always add some ...


6

I would vote for a spelling error, and that capaicine is actually capsaicin. I can't find any reference for the original spelling. I have never consumed horehound beer, but it seems to me that, in looking at the ingredients, a little spice-heat would make sense. Think of the spiciness you get in the back of your throat when drinking ginger ale. I would ...


6

What you've got there is a mix of precipitated proteins from the wort (the "trub") mixed with Saccharomyces cerevisiae spores, and also various compounds from the hops. It's on the bottom of the beer because you're making an ale; only lagers have the yeast floating on the top, and then only during active fermentation. Taste a bit. Then drink something to ...


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