26

Once roasted, rather than immediately plunging into cold water, place the peppers in a container with a tight fitting lid, or a bowl covered with plastic wrap. Let them steam for 15–20 minutes or until they cool. This will help the skins come off more easily.


23

There is a slight carry over with most things you cook. However I think the answer to most "Why is my stir fry not like the restaurant's?" questions, has to do with heat. Their stoves are much, much more powerful. You simply can't get that with a typical home stove. So, the way to get closest at home is to preheat your wok (or your largest flat, not non ...


11

Here are a few things to be wary of when buying peppers: Wrinkled skin -- it's a sign that they're drying out. It should be firm and smooth. Soft areas -- it's a sign that it's starting to rot in areas. It should be firm all over. Fuzz near the stem or blossom end -- you can't always see outward signs of the fuzzy mold, but if you do, it'll be right ...


10

You are not going to find anything outside the chili family that gives quite the same flavor, so substituting flavor-wise is not going to be possible. Note that paprika is a spice ground from particular pepper, so if you are allergic to all capsicum peppers, you don't want to use it. What you can do is build other flavorful combinations which you enjoy and ...


8

I share your allergy and have for some time. First - I'm very sorry, it's not a fun one to have. Second - there are a lot of spices you can use that give color and flavor without going into the pepper family. I have a recipe for a curry powder you can use: 2 tablespoons whole cumin seeds, toasted 2 tablespoons whole cardamom seeds, toasted 2 tablespoons ...


7

Bell Peppers have a very fast change from crisp to soft This is why you usually encounter them either raw or fully roasted and peeled. They change quickly. In a stir fry, cook them just a couple minutes and accept the slightly crunchy texture, or cook them through. I find this leads to a sometimes 'rubbery' texture, as the skin will not soften in the same ...


6

Galangal root is a possibility (more info). It's sort of like ginger that's been kicked up a notch on the hot/spicy axis. Chinese, Vietnamese and Thai stores will have it. There's also a powdered form available online. I've never tried that, but maybe it doesn't suffer the same terrible fate as powdered ginger. Prickly ash (Sichuan pepper) and Japanese ...


4

As a greenhouse operator, I can tell you that the first answer was the correct answer. Green peppers are really peppers that are picked before they are completely ripe. All green peppers, if left on the vine will transition through yellow and end up red. This is why a green pepper is more bitter than yellow, orange or red. Yellow and Orange peppers are ...


4

Red bell peppers freeze really well after being roasted. This is the method I would recommend for you. The problem with freezing first is that it can degrade the peppers (breaks the firm cell walls) and would likely make them more difficult to roast afterwards. If you roast them first, the cooking starts the cell collapse itself and the peppers don't tend ...


4

Add more of the other ingredients Add dairy Add acid Add a sweetener Serve with bland, starchy foods Options 1 and 5 provide a solution which will not alter the flavor of your chili too much. Source of ideas: The Kitchn


4

I'm not sure that this is how the restaurant did it, but perhaps that kind of texture could be achieved by blanching and freezing the pepper pieces, then reheating them in a microwave just prior to adding them to the sauce and serving. Blanching would ensure that they don't taste completely raw, and freezing would make them "mushier" without ruining the ...


4

These recipes seem to be a misunderstanding how stuffed pepper recipes typically work. At least when we are looking at the Balkan tradition, where the dish originated - this answer focuses on it only. If there is by now a changed form in US recipes, it is not included in my use of the word "traditional". Traditionally, stuffed peppers are made with ...


4

If you have a gas cooktop, you can put bell peppers directly on the burner to blister them. You will need to turn them every few minutes but they will blister quickly. Then steam them in a covered bowl until cool. The high heat will generally blister the skin without cooking the flesh. If you don't have a gas cooktop, you can do the same with a gas grill. I ...


3

Blanch them, drop them into cheesecloth and then give them a quick (5 second) dunk in an ice bath about 15 minutes before you want to serve the curry. Pull them out and pat them dry. The peppers essentially become a garnish that adds to the dish. You can't cook bell peppers from the start in a curry without them separating from the skin and becoming mush (or,...


3

What you're tasting is likely the eggplant -- eggplants with more seeds can have a distinct metallic taste, and can definitely ruin a dish. There's probably nothing that can be done for this batch, but for next time: Look at the bottom of the eggplant when you're picking it out -- if it has a small round indentation, then it's a "male" eggplant and will ...


3

Peppers are a low acid food, so under home conditions, pressure canning will be required to do so. See for example: NCFHFP recipe for peppers.


3

You can't. If you want a pepper puree, you have to remove the skins mechanically. Else you get a puree with "scales" of skin inside. You also mention making a stew out of the peppers. The skins are normally not removed for a stew, just eaten along. Many people prefer to not add the pepper at the beginning, but only to throw it in for the last 15 minutes, ...


3

A quick google brought this: In this case, the brown ones may have been closest to mature or viable. When fully ripe, most peppers seeds are supposed to be brown or tan. not white. In my experience, peppers with brown are just old and withered. They are safe, just not as tasty. Unless the brown thing is mold, in which case they may be poisonous.


2

You could try to concasse the pepper. Make light cuts through the skin (not through the flesh) then submerge in boiling water for 30 seconds, then shock in ice water? Maybe the peels get loose the same way a tomato releases its skin when treated this way. I haven't done this myself, so I don't know if it will work.


2

My favourite knife for this application would be a French Knife because they are large and have good finger room under the handle when doing chopping. What I would do and always have done is start by cutting the top and bottom ends off of the pepper and remove the inside ribs and seeds from the pepper. After you cut the tops and bottoms off, keep them and ...


2

The roasting process doesn't just heat the peppers, but the high, dry heat also causes a bit of both scorching and carmelization of the sugars, so I would expect there to be a bit of different flavor, even if both get cooked to the same consistency in a subsequent process.


2

It depends what you mean by "Too much green pepper". Too much bell pepper and the chili is not spicy/hot enough? Add more hot peppers, adjust other aromatics/spices to be proportional - don't recommend adding more meat/beans) Too much of some other chili and it's too spicy/hot? Serve with rice or other bland starch; add more of not-spicy ingredients ...


2

When people talk about "peppers" (plural), they are referring to the fruit of capsicum plants. This includes both hot and "bell" peppers. The singular "pepper" is used to talk about "peppercorns", which are in no way related to capsicums. And although white, green and black pepper are different ways of processing the same spice (containing pipirine), the ...


2

Paprika is, generally speaking, dried red bell pepper...though some varieties differ. Remember, drying changes and concentrates flavor. The flavor will be different. Think of them as different ingredients. Fresh and dried ingredients behave quite differently. Think about the difference between fresh and dried herbs, for example. Will it sweeten your ...


2

There are at least a dozen different types of paprika. In the US, you'll generally see regular, 'sweet', 'hot', 'smoked', 'Hungarian', and 'Spanish', although there are multiple types of Spanish and Hungarian paprika. The drying usually brings out a little bit of bitterness (and sometimes smokiness, depending on how it was dried), rather than just ...


1

Having done some extensive testing on various chili recipes it is fair to say that roasted peppers do taste 'different' than unroasted. That difference is more noticeable if you also peel the peppers after roasting as the peel itself is something of a 'flavor barrier'. This page has a good tutorial on how to roast and peel red bell peppers, but the technique ...


1

Roasted red peppers would add some subtle sweeter flavor and some smokiness depending how you roast it (over grill, wood ... ) But depending on the actual recipe it might just not make a big difference. Also when roasting peppers like that, you will remove the outer skin which is hard to do with un-roasted peppers.


1

Cut the pepper into strips of the appropriate size, then hold a bundle of strips in your off hand while you cut across them into cubes. As you're starting out, start with smaller bundles, then work your way to larger ones. (sharp knives make it easier to cut larger amounts at once, as they cut in rather than causing them to roll against each other).


1

I would cut the bell pepper on the sides first. What I mean by that is, cut the side of the pepper widely on all four sides such that you end up with four big somewhat rectangular portions of the pepper and the seeds portion will be left out. Discard that. Of the big pieces, proceed slicing them the way you want. Horizontal or vertical depending upon the ...


1

For efficiency, I cut planks off of the outside of the pepper, then slice those planks into strips. I've seen cooking shows where they take the top & bottom off to make a tube, and then slice it on one side, and slice that up ... and you do end up with straighter sticks that way. (no curved ends, other then when you cut up the bottom ... and maybe ...


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