Hot answers tagged

29

I think you're misunderstanding the claim slightly. You do not heat an already pureed soup, you puree and heat in one step. You can indeed make a hot soup from cold ingredients using certain high end blenders. The only one I've verified this with is the vita-mix. To do this, you put your ingredients in to the blender, turn it on, and let it run about 5 ...


10

There are many reasons for having a blender with selectable speeds: Not every time you want to liquify or make a mush of your food; quite the opposite, usually you want to keep a bit of texture into what you are blending. Thus, lower speed is better. Blending heats up your ingredients, either by the friction of the blades and by the heating of the blender ...


9

The three types of appliances you have listed have different primary uses, and best purposes, although they have some overlap in their capabilities. Blenders. Good at, well, blending: making smoothies, pureeing soup, grinding nuts to butter, and at the high end, making frozen ice drinks. By far the best device for this purpose, but not very versatile. ...


9

Looking at it from a materials-science standpoint rather than a physics standpoint, I agree that plastic is safer than glass. The difference is in how they break. Glass is stronger than plastic, for any plastic that a blender jar is likely to be made out of, and is less likely to break from, for example, trying to blend a spoon you forgot to remove. ...


8

Almost any normal sorbet recipe will contain a decent amount of sugar, and strawberries are no exception. I'd guess probably 1/2-2/3 cup per pound of strawberries. Use a substitute if you have an aversion - honey, agave, raw cane sugar, whatever you prefer. (Of course, anything liquid is going to contain some water, and cause a bit of ice, but it's still ...


8

As Catohound already mentioned, it's a symptom of using a high speed blender. You may find this technique useful. Tcrn the blender to its lowest setting and then slowly ramp it up until the top of the liquid just starts to circulate (usually around speed 4 or 5 on a Vitamix). As you run it at this low speed, you will see bubbles coming out in the ...


8

While two of the three items you mention are similar (though not identical) - the food processor and blender - the third is completely different - the stand mixer. There's actually a pretty awesome, in-depth guide to these and more kitchen tools on BuzzFeed. I'm going to reference this some and use images from it. Stand Mixers A stand mixer is not a ...


7

TL;DR: Plastic is better than Glass. It won't break (don't sue me if it does). If it does, you have about 0.0000518 seconds to get out of the way. A blender I picked at random. It has a powerful 750W motor. A different blender that I saw with 35,000 rpm had a 1725W motor. This divides down to be ≈ 15,200 RPM. The size: 40H x 18W x 18D So the main box ...


6

It's basically dead. The insulative enamel surrounding the wires in the motor has become overheated. That is where the smoke is coming from. If you continue to use the unit the enamel will degrade completely resulting in an electrical short. It is actually a bit of a fire hazard, so I would suggest discontinuing use of the unit. It is possible that the unit ...


6

The main difference between a food processor and a blender is its shape and how the food is mixed while it is being "cut up". In a blender, it relies on the funneling action of liquid to mix the food around. Otherwise only the bottom gets blended while the top stays solid. Food processors usually have a flat bottom and have a mechanism to turn the food as ...


6

Many blenders can be decently cleaned by just blending a couple changes of water, sometimes with detergent added in the first change, in them. If the manufacturer says the part is dishwasher safe (adhere strictly to instructions about temperatures, detergents, and racks to be used!) and it degrades, get a warranty replacement. There are two potentially ...


6

It seems that oil has been driven out of the bearings. For getting rid of oil contamination, soap is actually very useful. One or two empty runs should certainly get rid of what is left in the dishwasher itself, even if the oil is not food grade - otherwise, everyone running a dishwasher professionally would have to be worried about someone having eg ...


6

The measure you should use for making the smoothest purées is RPM, not wattage. You could put a blender jar on a 4500 Watt floor standing mixer and it wouldn't do anything more than roughly chop some berries (or car tires with that kind of torque.) Assuming the canister and blade designs are good, and it's not drastically underpowered for its speed (...


6

During blending, air is put into the milk mixture. Once you switch it off, not all air is kept inside the milk but makes it's way to the surface. These are the bubbles that make you think your milk is fizzy. Without being a chemist I assume full fat milk has more fat, therefore the emulsion is somewhat "thicker" and thus can hold the air better. There are ...


6

First off, if they're the texture of raisins, they aren't the sort of freeze-dried strawberries the recipe wants - what it wants is something totally dry, almost the texture of styrofoam. They should crunch if you bite into them, and slowly rehydrate in your mouth if you eat one without crunching. They'll look like full-sized slices of strawberry, only dry. ...


5

I've used both a Vitamix 500 (not extensively) and a Thermomix TM31. I didn't know there was a difference in RPM, but I didn't notice too much difference in end-effect when both were turned up to full power. So I think it doesn't make much difference at those speeds anymore. If you're having trouble milling spices though, it helps to heat them a while in ...


5

There is no doubt that raw ingredients maintain more vitamins. Is it a big deal to me? not really. The soup in vitamix never boils or simmers, or anything really close. So it is virtually raw. however, that means the uses are limited. If you want a rich-tasting soup, that's usually going to mean caramelizing your onions and garlic a little, slow-simmering ...


5

First off, the blender should not be damaged by the shells; if it is, it should have been replaced anyway. The mass of the shells is simply not enough to damage the blender in any significant way. I would not, however, recommend eating the product, for a few reasons: You cannot be confident that the egg shell has been completely pulverised. At some point, ...


5

Debbie's right about the gluten - overmixing is a reliable way to get tough pancakes. I'm not sure what the best solution is within your process. By far the easiest thing would be simply to use wholegrain wheat flour, letting someone else do the grinding for you. Failing that, I think you want to grind the grains up dry, and then it really won't take much ...


5

Your requirements appear to be for a "raw food" blender, the motor on those units are typically well above 500 watts (1000+ Watts). This enables harder/tough foods (such as ice, kale, nuts) to be broken down smooth enough that no sieving is required, with less risk of overheating the motor. Note: when a blender has a nut bag, or a nut bag option, it ...


5

There's really nothing to worry about. As long as it's safe when it goes into the freezer, and it's in a reasonably-sized container so it doesn't take forever to freeze, it's going to be safe when it comes out. Freezer storage limits are more about quality than safety; things can dry out or pick up odd flavors, especially if they're not well-sealed, but it'...


5

You are using the wrong tool for the job, what you need is a food processor, not a blender. A blender is designed for liquids, not solids, and the blade doesn't reach the edge. The blogger may have just used the wrong word, or maybe has a blender with a separate chopper attachment. You don't need to spend a bomb, I used a stick blender with a food ...


5

It may depend on how much blending they got. I find that if you blend them for too long or too fast, you strip the 'jelly' part from the seeds, then the seeds themselves start to break up. That tends to make it bitter, & I suspect that could be what you're tasting. My standard trick to homemade sieved tomatoes is first I rough chop them - you really ...


4

Hammering extra virgin olive oil in a blender or food processor allows astringent ("bitter") tasting polyphenol compounds to be detectable by the tongue. Cook’s Illustrated explained it in their March & April 2009 issue, page 30: Extra-virgin olive oil contains bitter tasting polyphenols coated by fatty acids, which prevent them from dispersing. If ...


4

Use a vacuum pump. People who pour liquid rubber into moulds use a vacuum chamber to get the bubbles out; I've heard of people degassing wine with a vacuum pump (see these youtube videos, for example); I wouldn't know why it wouldn't work for soup. The question is of course where you get a vacuum pump. If you're doing this in a commercial kitchen I'm sure ...


4

One way to modify the recipes (but you won't get the smooth texture of the original recipes) is to cut the onion and carrot a lot smaller than the original recipe ask for. You want to almost dice it. When you are frying the onion and carrot in the pan, do it for like 1-2 min rather than the whole 5 minutes. And finally you will need to cook it in the stock ...


4

Some commercial food processors are available with metal bowls, although these models may be quite expensive. You may may also wish to consider that many tasks a food processor is used for can be performed with a blender which typically do come with a glass pitcher, or with an immersion blender.


4

According to the manual of the Ninja Professional Blender: CAUTION: Do not process food or liquid that is hotter than 180°F/82°C. Allow very hot ingredients to cool before processing. Source: http://www.ninjakitchen.com/manual/BL500_30_IB_ENG_110223_2.pdf


4

Clearly, the Blendtec, "will it blend" videos, are a marketing tool designed to illustrate the power of the product, as opposed to illustrating recipes for delicious smoothies. Is it safe to drink? There is nothing here: http://www.coconutresearchcenter.org/ that I have been able to find, which deems the "woody part" inedible or unsafe. So, strictly ...


4

Likely the bitterness has nothing to do with this particular combination of ingredients. Rather, the blending process can break down the structures of each of the ingredients far more thoroughly then chopping and allows bitter compounds to leach out and saturate the overall mixture. Garlic in particular can be bitter if it's been pulverized, but it gets ...


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