9

The story is more complicated than SAJ tells it. Blueberries, like many other purple foods, are colored by a pigment called anthocyanin. It changes its color from red at very low pH to real blue at very high pH. At the blueberry's natural pH, the color is a purple with more red than blue in it. What you can do is to juice some blueberries separately, then ...


8

Honey versus sugar has nothing to do with your berries bursting or not. Assuming you are in the northern hemisphere you are getting out of season fruit as it is winter. Your blueberries are either greenhouse grown or have travelled halfway around the world from somewhere warm enough to grown them. Out of season blueberries tend to have less flavor and have ...


5

Normally freezing processes try to avoid forming large ice crystals by freezing rapidly and maintaining a temperature well below the freezing point of the liquid in the product (not simply 0°C due to sugar and other solutes, which concentrate as some liquid freezes). I suspect that the ones you are aiming to imitate have been through a thermal cycle in ...


4

Blueberries, despite the name, are purple, not blue. The appearance of being bluish in color is due to iridescence, not pigment. While you certainly could color the batter purple by pureeing some of the blueberries into it, it won't be blue. Think about the color or stain near the berries blueberry muffins you have eaten—it is a rich purple, not ...


4

When I was a kid, we picked tons of blueberries. We had a frame made out of 1" x 4" boards, 2'+ wide and about 4' to 5' long. At the far end, the frame was angled towards the middle (narrow side) with a space for the berries to drop into a bucket placed below (maybe 4" to 6"). On the bottom of the frame we had metal window screen stapled down (no cloth ...


4

When you are making blueberry muffins, frozen and fresh blueberries will give different end results. Frozen blueberries will almost "melt" when you bake the muffins, because the skin becomes more fragile after freezing. If you use fresh blueberries, they will be more intact after baking and will sometimes still "burst" when you bite into them. Which of these ...


3

I too love sour blueberries. I usually shake the punnet gently in the shop, and if they 'rattle' like they're hard, they will often be fairly sour. If they just thud around quietly, they are probably ripe and sweet. The same theory can be applied to picking blueberries - go for the firmer ones. In the UK, the time of year that is best for sourness is ...


3

Blueberries don't continue to ripen after picking so finding those that are blue and tart can be a challenge. If you see berries that are slightly purple or red, they may have been picked early and be a bit tart. If you're in an area where blueberries are raised, you might visit early in the season, which is late July to mid August. Picking your own might ...


3

Yes. Freezing can change the texture of the berries, but if you're cooking them down to make jam with, it shouldn't matter. Some recipes using frozen berries suggest preparing the fruit for this purpose (adding lemon or crushing strawberries), others start with pre-frozen fruit that had no special jam-related preparation.


3

Butterfly pea flowers, corn flower, chicory flowers, blue mallow flower and blue lotus all have blue flowers and the petals are used to make tea, in salads, or to spice foods (for the color). Black goji berries are also supposed to make a blue tea, so probably have a blue juice. If blueberries' purple juice disqualifies them, blue juice should qualify the ...


3

Reporting experimental results. I hypothesized that frozen berries will fare better than fresh. The reasoning? It will take them a while to thaw if the cream is poured at room temperature and put in the fridge right after. By the time they thaw, the cream would have set. In practice, it's more complicated. Alchimista's hunch is accurate. The skin of the ...


2

According to the U.S. Highbush Blueberry Council, you can spread half the batter, add the berries, and top with the second half of the batter. But, I usually coat the blueberries in flour. It prevents them from sinking and from "bleeding blueberry juice" into your loaf. That's what works for me.


2

You can add them at the start of the mixing process to help distribute them evenly. You may find that soaking them for a few minutes in warm water to re-hydrate will help the berries mix more evenly if adding at the add-in-time.


2

A meat that is blue is lingcod (about 20% of the time, according to Wikipedia). The rock/kelp greenling and cabezon also sometimes have blue flesh, though I'm not sure if the cabezon is edible (source). Some chickens and birds lay blue eggs. Now, the yolk and white aren't blue, but the shell is.


2

Blue corn would be a good example.


2

I've made grape, blackberry, elderberry, pear and apple jams and jellies, as well as combinations of those fruits, for years with Sure Jell dry pectin. I sometimes stir in spices like cinnamon for grapes and blackberries, nutmeg for pears and apples, and even lavender flowers or mint. Elderberries grow wild in our area. I use the instruction sheet in the box....


2

In my experiments with pureed blueberries as a photosensitizer in optical detectors, I've experienced that the pectin tends to leave the top fluid phase when centrifuged a lot. 4000G, for 60 minutes, has done the trick - at least I don't experience gelling of my samples. Admittedly, it's of somewhat limited usefulness, but you never know.


2

Living in Maine we have a lot of blueberries.The answer above using the frame is excellent and the best way.I have found that putting them in a bowl of water did not work very well.We picked two big bowls yesterday and I do not have a frame so I find the best way is to use a couple of kitchen towels put them on the table pouring about a cup of berries on the ...


2

What you describe are definitely symptoms of coagulating protein. Not all proteins in quark are coagulated, else it wouldn't be creamy but rubbery like mozzarella (actually, more like cottage cheese, because it would still be grainy). My first guess is that the blueberry acid curdles the protein. Blueberries are also known to act a bit strangely due to ...


2

I have found putting my blueberries, I use frozen, into the liquid for a few minutes before adding the liquids to the dry ingredients will give your muffins a nice blue color. The liquid will have a slightly purple look to it. The baking powder in the dry mix will then react with the blueberry juices and turn the batter a nice shade of blue.


1

Yes, the blueberries will bleed, and, what's even more non-4th-ish, they will make purple or lavender stains instead of blue. If you are serving the roll rather quickly after assembly, consider thickening the pureed blueberries seperately with some corn starch or pudding mix. Then you can make a blue-and-white filling inside the red roll. The blueberries ...


1

A really big difference for muffins is that if you use frozen blueberries, many, if not most, of the berries will have burst. Even if you strain them (which you will pretty much have to do), you will have purple muffins. Personally, that doesn't bother me at all. Blueberry season is very short, I'd rather use frozen (or canned) blueberries than out-of-season ...


1

Puree a few of the berries, say 1/4 cup, before adding to the batter. That shouldn't be enough liquid to mess up the recipe badly. Work quickly once you've got the puree in though, blueberries are acid enough (pH about 3.1) to start your leavening agent working immediately. That'll mean flat muffins if you don't pop them in a hot oven fast.


1

The enzyme, Pectinase AKA Polygalacturonase, might prove useful to you. Apparently, winemakers use it to reduce cloudiness. You can buy it online.


1

Round things will readily roll down an inclined plane, such as a tilted cutting board, while squished berries will stick to the surface. A dishpan makes for a nice container to catch the good berries. You have to keep the berry stream a bit thin, and swipe off the damaged berries every pound or so, but you can get through a lot of berries very quickly this ...


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