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47

Chicken bones have a tendency to 'splinter' when 'mashed' (as in chewed upon), which is why you never give chicken bones to a dog. This applies equally to humans, if we gnaw on a chicken bone it is more like to create a harmful splinter that may find itself lodged in any number of places in your digestive system. That said, as has been commented above, ...


32

You're doing it wrong™. Your question is, essentially, "What code-word should I use to tell my butcher to give me a cut of beef with properties X, Y and Z?" Don't do that. Just go to your butcher and describe what you want. Quite apart from anything else, the cuts of meat that, say, a British butcher understands will be different to the ones ...


23

Well, many steak experts have held for years that bone-in steak just tastes better, something about that marrow being good. J. Kenji Lopez-Alt from Serious Eats tested that theory. He found that the steak bones were too impenetrable for the marrow to actually flavor grilling steak, but that the bones provided beneficial insulation: To test this, I ...


15

Pressure cookers will quickly soften most chicken bones. We make stock with our chicken carcasses in a pressure cooker, and the resulting bones can be crushed with fingers, no splintering.


14

Absolutely. I have this one here: J.A. Henckels International Classic 6-inch Cleaver ... it is billed as being designed "for chopping through joints and bones". These cleavers tend to have good, solid weight and a short blade bevel to give it endurance and power. You would not slice things with this. This is a momentum tool to crash through the target ...


12

If you are looking for a bone-in cut of beef for an aesthetic purpose then it would be hard to do better than beef shin, also known as shank. It has a good, strong bone with a cavity and the bone will be cut straight across. It's also very flavorful meat. The consideration with it is cooking, shin is very tough and requires low and slow with moisture, ...


12

I believe an arm roast is what you are after: For cooking purposes note that this is a "roast" (and not just a 'big honk'in steak') and is suitable for a low & slow cook time in a crock pot but not just 'throwing it on the grill'.


10

Beef bones can be used multiple times, but less flavor and gelatin will be extracted from each additional use. Harold McGee's "On Food and Cooking" describes this. Because a standard kitchen extraction of eight hours releases only about 20% of the gelatin in beef bones, the bones may be extracted for a second time, for a total of up to 24 hours. The ...


8

Refrigerated stock is supposed to gel. Its caused by the gelatin you're (intentionally!) extracting from the bones. To determine if its a success, you'd taste it. Assuming it tastes right, then its a success. If you had you cooked it longer, you may have extracted a little more flavor & gelatin (so it'd be an even thicker gel). You can also make ...


8

It depends what you are making and how you are cooking the chicken: If what you intend to create is some sort of long-cooked "pieces of meat in sauce" then leave the meat on the bones and simmer for an hour or so. The bones will give much more flavour. When the meat is tender, remove it from the bones, which will be easy, cut it up and put it back in the ...


8

Breast of lamb (or veal) is what would be called the belly on a pig -- it's the relatively thin and flat layer of muscle and fat surrounding the ribcage. As such, the bones that you have are in fact ribs, and they're quite easy to remove from the remainder of the meat. Because of the muscle that's between the bones, connecting them, they can be treated as ...


8

To add to the existing comments and answer. There are absolutely bone cleavers. The Chinese are very fond of cleavers. While, most commonly found Chinese cleavers that you'll find are "vegetable knives", they also make bone cleavers. If you have a chinatown or a asian restaurant supply store near you, you can probably find one for cheap. I have really nice ...


8

Absolutely! My wife makes her own dog food out of 1 Lb of rice, 1 Lb of carrots, and the trimmings of 1 whole chicken. After she breaks down the chicken for the meat that the family will eat during the week, all the trimmings, including the bones, are put into a pot and boiled so we get the marrow and gelatin from the bones as well. I'd describe it as ...


7

What ever it is, sounds like sinew or other hard tissue, it's done it's purpose now the flavour, sugars, geletine etc is now in your broth and you should probably discard them. I don't imagine they will taste of anything now and the texture is likely to be vile. By all means taste a bit to see what I mean. It won't make you ill though you may possibly gag......


7

All fish have bones, some have more complicated bone structures than others. Generally the ones which you will find in the store are ones which are easier to deal with as that's what people want. Preparation of them varies widely depending on whether they are smooth skinned, scaly, whether the skin is edible, and bone structure. Some fish like mackerel and ...


7

Worm bin. Worms need calcium and sometimes they struggle to get enough. People recommend eggshells in the worm bin for that reason. You are not supposed to put meat in the worm bin (because of rats) but I think these bones are ok. They will fall apart pretty quick. If you don't have a worm bin you could bury them in your garden. I am told tomatoes ...


6

Formulas for stock are somewhat variable, but a common case is to use 3 kg of bones (and half a kg of mirepoix, which is a vegetable mix used for taste) with 4-5 l water, which after cooking down yields 3 l of stock, or just a little bit more than that. I couldn't find an especially good figure for the bone:meat ratio of chickens, but many Internet sites ...


6

To get that gelatin you're looking, you need joint bones and lots of them. The back, neck, tail are great for that. If you've ever made Ox tail soup you'll know what I'm talking about as you'll get a really thick coating on your tongue from the gelatin that is disolved from the tail's connective tissues. The reason for avoiding marrow bones is because it ...


6

What you're proposing is similar to 'remouillage' ('rewetting'; sometimes called 'second stock'). It's a stock made from bones that have already been used to make stock. It may not be quite as flavorful as you'd get from your first stock, but in your case, you haven't made stock with it, so any water-soluble bits that haven't been removed would still be on/...


5

It isn't necessary to even thaw bones before tossing them in the water, so long as you're cooking long enough. With that said, to roast first and then toss in the stock, the goal is to get some browning going (I'm assuming your recipe says to roast at a relatively high temp like 400) to add some flavor, much like browning the meat at the bottom of a pot for ...


5

A lot of the flavor comes from the marrow of the bone. Rib bones will need companion soup bones to help them. Alone, the flavor will seem weak or watered down. Now, if you are willing to put in the time.... Bake them first at 325f for an hour, let them cool and hit them with a hammer to crack them. you might want to cover them with a towel as not to send ...


5

Yes, you absolutely can make stock from the bones. In fact, I used to be a bit mystified at people using "meaty" bones, since I first read about making stock from the bones. The method for making this kind of stock calls for "bare rendering" bones - with almost all the meat removed. The marrow and any connective tissue supply most of the flavor. To ...


5

I always leave bones in stews and stocks, even when freezing. I don't think there is anything in bones that would accelerate spoilage, specially after being cooked for so long in high temperatures. Nutritionally, I think there are two factors to consider Bones are composed by a matrix of proteins and minerals. Cooking denaturate some of the protein ...


5

Straining might work, but you may need to use a process known as "decanting": Let the stock sit until any sediment falls to the bottom. Remove the good liquid, avoiding the sediment at the bottom. You can do this a few ways : Use something to scoop the good liquid off the top Use a hose to siphon off the good liquid until just before you get to the ...


5

No. Bone is not typically considered fit for human consumption. Cooked, they become dangerous. They are brittle and sharp and can puncture the intestines(source). Uncooked they become a pathogen risk, especially with chicken bones. There was a time when people ate bone meal, presumably for calcium, but that is no longer considered a good practice. More ...


4

If a recipe asks for a boned piece of meat, this indeed means that the bone is removed. I think the easiest and cleanest way of doing this is just asking your butcher. As for doing it yourself, there a some videos available online, e.g. this one. Since your meat is a bit smaller, I would suggest to lower the temperature a bit (to 340F) and leave it in the ...


4

Standard answer: No, you should not use a chef's knife for those jobs. The chef's knife should be very sharp and is used mainly for chopping vegetables or meat. Alternatives have been discussed here. A cleaver, a shears, the back of the chef's knife even.


4

Raw Sardines do not have soft bones. If they did they wont have a strong skeleton. All canned fish that have bones in them have soft bones be it large fish or small fish because they are cooked. You will know this because bone in canned salmon has soft bones Its not about chemicals. As organic canned fish with bones have soft bones. It is because once inside ...


4

You can use chicken bones to make broth only once, all the goodness gets cooked out of them the first use. You could re-cook them for hours and get nothing from them.


4

I'm not certain what you are asking? Are you wanting to start a vegetable stock and use it as a base for the bone stock at a later time ? IMO that would work. Do a vegetable stock when you have enough vegetable scraps, portion it and freeze it. When you have enough bones, do the stock using the vegetable stock use made earlier.


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