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7

Worm bin. Worms need calcium and sometimes they struggle to get enough. People recommend eggshells in the worm bin for that reason. You are not supposed to put meat in the worm bin (because of rats) but I think these bones are ok. They will fall apart pretty quick. If you don't have a worm bin you could bury them in your garden. I am told tomatoes ...


5

No. Bone is not typically considered fit for human consumption. Cooked, they become dangerous. They are brittle and sharp and can puncture the intestines(source). Uncooked they become a pathogen risk, especially with chicken bones. There was a time when people ate bone meal, presumably for calcium, but that is no longer considered a good practice. More ...


4

On top of the stove the issue is boiling dry. At that point the temperature can rise almost unchecked. This will result in unpleasant fumes at best, flames at worst. Even in the latter case, because you should be using a fairly tight fitting lid, everything should be contained, but I wouldn't rely on that. The oven is different. Once the pot is up to ...


4

This contains a nice explanation of why meat is juicy and tasty, and it is due to the presence of fat and conjunctive tissue in the muscles, as well as brining and marinating. If you take a look at bird anatomy, the chest and other major muscle masses have less fat and conjunctive tissue as they evolved to be, well, muscle masses for propelling the bird ...


3

Paitan broth Depending on how long you cooked your bone broth, your chicken carcass still might have some flavor. After straining your first broth, add fresh water and more aromatics to the pot. Boil for a few more hours, and then blitz it with an immersion blender. Strain, yielding a thick creamy broth that makes a delicious bowl of ramen. (Most of the ...


3

Buy a iron skillet and you can cook your fish over open fire in you yard. No cost other than scrounging some wood. Use a piece of heavy aluminum foil as a lid. Adjust temperature by height of pan above flame. As for fish, from your list flounder would be healthiest and easiest to check for bones. If you have to fillet yourself, make a cut across fish just ...


3

There's a specific term for reusing ingredients for stock twice: remouillage (which literally means a "rewetting"). Usually this "second stock" is not used directly for broth, as it has significantly less flavor than the primary stock. That said, depending on the type of bones, the amount of meat used in making the stock, etc., it may still have a very ...


2

I just pressure cooked a turkey, with roasting in the boiler just prior to the initial pressure cooking session, then afterwards, pressure cooking the carcass (bones and remaining skin and unused meat) two more times. After the second pressure cooking session of the turkey carcass and remains, the turkey bones were easily broken apart, either broken in the ...


1

I cooked my whole turkey carcass for several days and poured all the bones and juice from boiling it, a little bit at a time: liquified it in my osterizer to get all the marrow and nutritional value but strained it to get rid of all the pulp at the bottom and have been drinking it. It’s delicious! I’ve heard it’s good for arthritis. It made over a quart ...


1

just adding another method for options ... For really big bones like cow, deer, elk, etc. leg bones, femur, scapula, etc. Set a bone on or wrapped in an old, clean towel on a concrete sidewalk or driveway Holding a 6# sledge hammer by the handle with the head hanging straight down about 2 feet above the bone, hit the bone So, starting out with very ...


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