11

Last time I did one it was an overnight proposition, sources I find recommend planning on 24 Hours for a 150lb Kalu-a-que. A pig roasted in the ground, Hawaiian or Kalua style, can take 12 hours if done right and if it is filled with fruits and vegetables it can take 16 hours or longer. If your pig is a purchased commercially (from a local farmer or ...


8

Your only option is to cook them separately from the braise, then add them when plating. That way, you can maintain the consistency that you like. There is no way to firm them up after they've been cooked through. If you like the flavor that braised carrot adds, do both...some carrot in the braise, some carrot cooked as you like for serving.


6

Even given a standardized recipe and method, cooking times are always only a guideline. Quality recipes always give you a test for knowing when the product is done. The reason for this is that there are many uncontrolled (at least from the recipe author's point of view) such as, in the case of ribs: Exact dimensions of the ribs Natural variation in the ...


6

Pot Roasting = Braising This more recent document from the same association, Cattlemen's Beef Board and National Cattlemen's Beef, supports this by using them interchangeably: 3 Simple Steps For Braising/Pot Roasting Beef I was trying to figure out what the document from your question may have been implying by the cuts the different cooking techniques were ...


6

Yes, but I don't know if there's an official name for it. We do this a lot in pressure cooking, to get the appealing mallard reactions (caramelization). Typically, after cooking you can put the meat under the broiler to crisp it up (common examples are a whole chicken or carnitas). Example recipe for Carnitas: https://callhimyeschef.com/2013/02/19/carnitas-...


5

The collagen in the ribs needs to get to a temperature of about 160 F to start breaking down into water and gelatin. If your oven can be set as low as 175 or 180 F on a normal bake or convection bake setting that is probably a better alternative unless you have access to an oven thermometer and can measure what temperature the warm setting on your oven ...


5

The above methods will work, but are slightly flawed. You can sous vide a whole quail, but it is inherently wrong to do so. The white (breast) meat is inherently more tender and requires less heat than the tougher legs and wings. Separating the breasts and wings/legs into two sous vide bags works the best. I like to cook the breasts at 130°F (55°C) (hold ...


5

Three potential methods or changes you can try: soak the quail in brine for 2-3 hours before searing. You can do this in a large zip-lock sack or in a covered bowl. Make sure to store the quail/brine combo in your refrigerator during the soaking. Let quail reach room temperature before cooking. Pan-searing the quail might dry out the smaller pieces, i.e. ...


5

My Fanny Farmer recipe for pot roast does not submerge the roast in the liquid. So I would interpret the two words like this: braised: cut into pieces (perhaps bite-sized, perhaps serving sized) and submerged in simmering liquid for a long time, probably with lid to prevent liquid loss pot roasted: left whole and put into a lidded pot with an inch or so of ...


5

For the recipe you are using, any flavorful cut of meat that is up for long cooking should work okay. Had to look up casserole steak as that is not something I've ever seen in the US, at least not by that name. From a Jamie Oliver forum , please see the following: Braising steak is often used in a casserole. Mostly nowadays "Chuck" steak is sold for ...


5

I have had smoked puffin once in Iceland. It made me think of a lean, strongly-gamey/livery duck/goose breast that's been sous-vided till very tender - I remembered the grains (meat fibres) to be very fine. There was a mild sort of silky fishiness (that was masked by the smoked preparation) too, but I'm not sure if I imagined that knowing the puffin was a ...


5

Hervé This has an interesting discussion on this problem in this book. The process of losing juice when cooking a piece of meat is in big part mechanical. Meat is basically composed of muscle cells tied together by collagen, which is sensitive to heat. Quoting Hervé: When a temperature of 50°c (122°f) is reached in the outside layer, the collagen ...


4

I have done it both ways successfully. Flouring the meat before browning does give a little extra flavor, plus the flour continues to cook while the meat is braising. I personally think it gives a richer, deeper flavor and ensures that you won't have any raw flour flavor. If you are happy with your results using this method I wouldn't change it. :)


4

The benefits of using a tagine will be marginal at best. It will save some moisture loss over a dutch oven, however the cooking time will continue to be around 25% longer than conventional recipes as the tagine won't raise the temperature over your lower boiling point at all. Your moisture loss will continue to be high due to the increased cooking time, ...


4

After 6-8 hours at 225° your meat's going to be 225°, there's no value of measuring its temperature. After a couple of hours any piece of meat will reach the same temperature of the oven. When cooking tough cuts like brisket target temperature is immaterial, you're never going to serve them less than well done, the point is to cook them long enough for the ...


4

Searing frozen meat is fine, and is a useful way to get a good sear without overcooking the inside (since you can sear for longer, and at a lower temperature). There are no food safety issues I can think of which would apply to short ribs but not steaks, particularly since the former are cooked for longer at a higher internal temperature. The only problem I ...


3

If the goal is to melt collagen, couldn't that be done just as easily at a higher temp? No, it won't be. The reaction which has to happen to the collagen doesn't go quicker when the temperature is higher. You have to get it to 68 Celsius and wait for it to happen. If it is at more than 68 Celsius, it won't happen quicker, or better, or anything. You have ...


3

If you are simmering, boiling or poaching something, the depth does not matter. As long as your food is completely immersed in liquid, all the liquid has a sufficiently regular temperature due to convection, and it cooks well. So the stews you mention are no problem, you can fill the pot up to the brim. Braising is a different beast entirely. In braising, ...


3

There should be no adjustments required: Yes, two pots take a few minutes longer to heat up than one, but with 4-5 hours total, it shouldn't matter.


3

I have this shape (without lid) as a cast iron pan, not enameled. I mainly use it in the oven, not on stovetop. It's a great pan for gyvetch, moussaka and generally Middle eastern oven dishes. You can brown the meat and sweat the onions in it on stovetop, then add the other ingredients and put it in the oven. All the juices stay in the pan - if you brown ...


3

a) Jelly beans are made of sugar, starch, flavorings, and pectin. As such, it's fine to boil, mash, roast, fry, steam, or really do anything you want with them. The worst possible consequence is them sticking to be bottom of the pot and being hard to remove. b) First, black jelly beans are generally flavored with licorice and not anise, and star anise ...


3

The carrots can't be 'un-cooked' once they're cooked, so as moscafj says, cook some separately for serving. Don't waste the cooked carrots, though - blend them into your sauce. Best of both worlds.


2

If your issue is with the meat being too tough and dry, then your best bet is to marinate beforehand. Marination is the process of soaking food in seasoning before hand to flavor meat and also to cause the marinade to break down some of the tissues in the meat. This will cause more moisture to be absorbed into the end result. This will likely solve your too ...


2

You really need an accurate oven thermometer - the thermostats on domestic oven are notoriously bad, especially at controlling low temperatures.


2

There are only three advantages that I can think of for a brasier: The lower sides result in faster evaporation when cooking on the stove top, as it doesn't hold in the steam. It's typically not as heavy for the same surface area. You should be able to fit two of them in your oven (on different racks), which is unlikely for a dutch oven. Personally, I don'...


2

Just a question of flavor layers. Reducing the wine after deglazing will create some deeper flavoring. It will remove some of the wine's acidity and concentrate the flavor that will complement the stock and wine that will be added later on in the recipe.


2

Spare ribs and pork shoulder are both cooked in an oven at the same temperature(~225F) for me. The difference is time. A pork shoulder takes at least 8 hours but usually around 12 hours to give good pulled pork. Ribs are closer to 3-4 hours for the meat to get tender but not so tender that they fall off the bone. I have never cooked country style ribs but ...


2

One potential downside to this method is that with a thick coat of flour, you're mostly browning the flour, not the meat, and thus possibly creating different flavor compounds than if you were searing the meat directly. Maillard reactions are complicated stuff. If you're doing this, you should probably shake off excess flour to leave a very thin layer so ...


2

One layer ensures even cooking. However, I can't say I've never sneaked another portion or two into the braising pot...with no ill effects. The important point is that you have a very moist environment. These kinds of recipes are fairly forgiving. One caveat...filling the pot too much could compromise the ingredients. You mention arroz con pollo. I ...


2

There's a trick that's used in some high-altitude areas (eg, the Alps and Pyrennes) that I've seen on cooking shows, but have never tried myself, that might help you without the need to purchase any new cookware: Make a dough out of flour and water. Form the dough into a rope Press the rope of dough around the lid's edge to seal it. It's been so long since ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible