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16

Unlikely. Without even getting into the mechanics of how it would work, simple physics dictates that you can't get the temperature of this "immersion oven" above 100 degrees Celsius. Most cakes and breads are cooked at temperatures above 170 degrees Celsius. A second issue is that moisture can escape when baking in a normal oven. Your "immersion oven" would ...


10

So normally, stove top cooking never results in all around heat like in an oven but what if you were to submerge (underwater bath instead of just around the sides) a dish in simmering water and then cover it completely (to prevent water from getting in) until it's cooked? This sounds a lot like sous vide which is currently becoming commonplace after having ...


5

Fully submerged is going to be a problem, as you'd need an airlock to allow air to escape so you don't end up creating a pressure cooker. (which would prevent the bread from rising). If you were going to try this, I'd look into fermentation airlocks and grommets to install on a mason jar lid, and then use the largest straight-sided mason jar that I could ...


5

It seems there is no reliable conversion formula - if you check the websites of mixer manufacturers, they go as low as 1/5 of the time (KitchenAid) or suggest machine-kneading for about 4/5 (Bosch). And I don’t think it’s just because the KitchenAid is so super fast. The good thing is that the lack of a formula forces you to learn how to recognize a well-...


4

Mold comes in many different colors and textures. I have seen white, green, black and even orange hues on bread, long haired ones and others that look like dust. The only other possible explanation for white spots may be flour from dusting, but we can safely exclude that here, this bread doesn’t show a floury crust. In short, if it grows on your bread and ...


4

Putting the rye in the levain will make a few positive differences: The rye will give the yeast a different food source, so the flavors the yeast produces may be subtly different It gives the flavors from the rye grain longer to permeate the dough Rye is often used in sourdough starters because of its natural yeasts. Natural yeasts add complex flavors, the ...


4

You can certainly mix together all of the dry ingredients out of the above, and store them. They should store for a few weeks in the fridge, and a few months in the freezer. However, by dry, I'm referring to the following out of the above: Bread flour Nonfat dry milk Salt Yeast Granola Sun dried tomatoes, if completely dried (not packed in oil or brine) ...


3

You can make some sort of bread by adding plenty of the highest protein wheat flour you have. You'll have to judge the hydration when you knead. I'd aim for proportions like a yeast-risen cornbread (or failing that a basic enriched dough) , and make it into rolls, then eat them warm (or reheated). Rising will also be a matter of guesswork/judgment. I find ...


3

In a yeast-risen bread, like the banana bread video you linked to, it's important that the liquids in the recipe are allowed to properly hydrate the flour particles. This is so that the gluten proteins present in wheat flour can start to develop the gluten network needed to contain the gases produced by the yeast. If you add fats such as oil or butter along ...


3

I know this is an old question, but since I have been recently looking up the 'how to's' of ciabatta (which is how I came upon this question) I thought I'd pass on what I've picked up through recent reading and practice. Stretching the loaf out long-ways is an important stage of shaping a ciabatta, it seems. I imagine that everyone finds that the middle ...


2

As the other answer suggests, more shaping may be the key. One possibility is to add additional folds. Most sourdough recipes I've worked with have a first rise (before shaping and placing in a banneton) much longer than an hour. Try leaving it out more like 3 hours total, and do a stretch and fold at 1 and 2 hours in. Then shape tightly as a boule (...


2

Butter and other fats are known to inhibit gluten formation. To be able control that, adding the butter once some of the gluten networks are formed seems to be the reason why.


1

I understand it the same way: the wetter side on top. The Bottom side sucked up the oil while leavening. And by turning the dough she gets also the other side greasy. I think the lady just likes to use her hands. As she turns the dough she pushes her finger inside it to spread it. I actually don't see a different way to do the focaccia as you are supposed ...


1

Really difficult to simply say that it would require x% compared to hand-kneading. Heck, you really shouldn't pay attention to time guidelines when mixing dough at all due to the numerous factors that can have an effect on gluten development (acidity, temperature, hydration, etc.). Do a quick google search on 'gluten window' and you will then know how to ...


1

An unescorted loaf of bread, in a loaf pan, generally bursts along the top of the loaf pan. If you want a "burst" look you need to score the area you want a burst using a razor blade or sharp knife. Are you making a no-knead loaf in a Dutch oven? They generally burst along the shaggy seams. Rob is right, scoring and bread turning into a brick are not ...


1

If it can be done, it will make lots of difference. Different sourdough recipes are geared towards breeding different bacterial species, which give their own taste to the final product. There is no answer to "what will be a better choice". If you have a known good recipe for a starter using milk, then it is up to the eater to decide which result tastes ...


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