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4

Your photos each look like decent early attempts at bread making. I would encourage you to keep at it. While I think your process will improve (for example, you probably want to improve gluten development with further kneading or stretch and folds), nothing about your process would impact the flavor to the point of making it "unusual." I would make two ...


4

I don't think there is a baking reason behind the design. Here is a loaf pan from 1897, for example. Perhaps the popularity of the rectangular loaf can be traced back to the Pullman Palace Car Company in 1868. In the same article the author points out that early 18th century European bakers were using square tin pans to create loaves with minimal crust. I ...


4

Adding baking soda won't help you at this point, for a variety of reasons. First, it won't have any acid to react with. Technically, baking powder clears that bar, but since it fails at the next ones, it is not a reasonable alternative. Second, you won't be able to mix in the powder properly in already-kneaded dough. If you really attempted to use it, ...


4

The thing that makes bread chewy is gluten. The easiest way to make chewier bread would probably be to use flour with a higher gluten content. You've said you don't want to "add gluten" so I'll assume that option is not on the table. For the same reason, I'll assume that replacing some of the whole wheat flour with white flour (which has a higher gluten ...


4

Ken Forkish's Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast has a brief note on storing baked bread (page 77). I got over my aversion to storing bread in plastic bags many years ago, after trying all the alternatives and realizing nothing else keeps the bread as well. The crust will soften, but the bread won't dry out. The straight dough breads will keep for two or three ...


3

I've used essentially the same recipe as you found on Tasty for at least 15 years (I started with the Jim Lahey recipe). From the 4 c.:2 c. flour-water ratio, it's a standard “no-knead” recipe. It's a wet enough dough that the bubbling action during the rise develops the gluten. I mix mine with a spoon. After the first rise, I stir it again gently a couple ...


3

Adding any or all of your suggestions -- milk, butter, and/or eggs -- will likely soften the resulting bread. They will also cause it to remain softer for a longer period of time. But they will also tend to change the flavor and texture of your bread. If you're used to baking a crusty bread with only flour, water, yeast, and salt, the bread with enriching ...


3

"white colour powdery lines" is flour. It means that your dough is not mixed enough. Also either your oven is not heated enough (and/or it heat from one side) or when the dough is resting one side of it become more cold that stop dough from working and that's why you have difference in density.


3

Yes, it is possible to make bread using baking powder or baking soda. However, I would strongly recommend that you find a recipe using those ingredients rather than trying to convert a recipe that is supposed to use yeast. Soda bread made with baking soda, for example, is a very traditional type of bread. Baking soda requires an acid ingredient to react ...


2

A few things that could be going on: 0.2 grams of instant yeast is a pretty small amount. Even a little variation in measurement could make a difference in how fast it rises. Also, whether this small amount was well-distributed throughout the flour at the outset could affect the timing of the rise. Is the yeast fresh/good? Older yeast can be sluggish. ...


2

For this, I'll turn to Elizabeth David's English Bread and Yeast Cookery (1977), which is a very useful resource for the history of bread-baking. In a chapter beginning on page 206 entitled "Moulds and Tins for Bread and Yeast Cakes," she begins by noting that: Bread baked in pans or tins of uniform shape and capacity was a late development. Indeed, ...


2

I make naan on my BGE all the time. You can't replicate a tandoor, however, the results are very good. I find it best to cook the naan directly on the grill, and over the coals. I find lower heat is best. I either bake them at the end of a grill session, when the heat is dying, or I completely close the bottom vent (leaving the lid open...not just the lid ...


2

Start with the liquid ingredients first including yeast and sugars but leave out the salt. Mix the salt with the flour. Start the machine on low and add just enough flour/salt to create a thick batter. Mix until smooth at least 3 minutes then add the remaining flour a little at a time until the dough climbs the hook. Your dough is done.


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