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5

This should not impact your rise at all, unless the container is too small to allow for dough expansion. In which case, you might have a mess on your hands. Many people (me included) use sealable containers, though I more frequently just use a clean kitchen towel (a plate would work too), the idea is just to keep the dough from drying.


3

This question is a bit hard to answer because there are just so many variables. Let's do some troubleshooting. There are two ways I could see your problem: badly proofed bread or underbaked bread. It's fairly easy to tell which. When your bread is rising it should double in volume. If it doesn't rise enough then your bread will be dense and won't blow up ...


3

In the southern US, people make what is known as flour bread. (Also known as biscuit bread or skillet bread.) It's made with biscuit dough that is flattened into a circle about 1/2" thick. It is cooked on top of the stove, in a lightly greased skillet over medium-high heat on one side until that side is golden brown and then flipped and cooked until golden ...


2

The easiest dough staple to make stovetop is some kind of flatbread. Bread dough can be pretty simple, flour and salt and water and yeast, so you don't need to worry about milk or eggs - though you can try adding additions if you want to modify the results, fats to make it softer, flavoring agents, etc. I think you'd be looking for something rolled ...


2

A recipe that calls for adding dry milk powder to whole milk is probably trying to add protein. Try some finely ground nuts, or maybe chickpeas.


2

It's easy to make croutons crunchy: Just dry the bread pieces in a dehydrator or low-temperature oven (around 125°C) for a couple of hours. This should be done before adding oil or seasonings, since the process would cook off a lot of their flavor. Afterwards, drizzle on the olive oil and seasonings, and bake or fry as desired. (Be careful with the oil: ...


2

I agree with @moscafj. However, one consideration might be anaerobic respiration rather than aerobic - resulting in some alcohol being produced. Over normal rising times I don't think this will reach any level that might either kill the yeast (around 10-12% usually) or produce intoxication of the consumer, but it might well produce a moderate amount of ...


1

My method of getting extra crispy croutons is to cube the bread rather small (~1cm or a bit less), add butter to the pan and melt(i guess, ~20g for two slices of bread, but it's hard to say.), add the bread cubes, and pan fry them gently over low(!) heat, stirring occasionally. It takes quite a while. When they take on a crispy outside and golden color, I ...


1

The method described by @Sneftel will certainly work. However, if you do not have a dehydrator, this can easily done in the oven. I regularly oil and season bread cubes first, then place on a sheet pan in a low oven 225F (107C). If you have a convection function on your oven, you use a slightly lower temperature. Shake or mix every 15 minutes or so. ...


1

I recommend canned evaporated milk, which has only a slightly higher ratio of milk solids than you are going for, or you can make your own at a better ratio by simmering 2 cups of regular milk down until it becomes about 1.5 cups. Basically the powder is adding about 4% more milk solids, which is a very small amount.


1

Maybe you could substitute all the dry milk powder with milk. 1g dry milk powder could use about 7.5g water to make into liquid milk. So for your recipe you could use extra 75~100g liquid milk to replace original 10g milk powder. If too moist in result you may add less all-purposed flour for dough adjustment. Just thought maybe you could also replace milk ...


1

Some flatbreads are cooked directly over a gas flame (at least on one side. When a colleague made something similar they were rolled out rather thicker than naan and had a nice combination of thin crispy crust and soft interior. The bread is held with tongs. This dough is made from only flour, water, and oil Another option that might work (I've only ever ...


1

Flatbread like naan definitely seems like the easiest way to go. For the best results I recommend a dutch oven or a cast iron pan with a cast iron lid. Here are instructions for using a dutch oven with a bread pan.


1

Definitely yes, i really overworked my ciabatta dough and it now has a very dense crumb. Everything was fine the dough fermented like a star but due to overworking, it failed in the end.


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