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17

Sure, you can begin a new sour dough starter with the discard from a feeding. However, the reason for discarding isn't simply to reduce the amount. As your starter matures it also becomes much more acidic. Acidity is problematic for yeast and bacterial activity and, ultimately, the rise and flavor of your final product. So, you discard during feeding time ...


15

Absolutely you can. When you use the starter to make bread you make an arbitrary decision of which part of the starter you use and which to feed, the part you scoop out is just as viable as the part you keep. When you discard some instead of using it the same rule applies, so all you need to do is put some in a container and feed it the same way. You can ...


7

For a firm loaf you want more gluten development. So: Cut out the fat: it impedes the reactions forming gluten. Make sure your yeast or sour-dough starter is active, or use instant yeast (very reliable in my experience): the carbon dioxide created as a by-product of fermentation promotes gluten development. Use stronger (that is, higher protein) white flour ...


6

Here are a few ideas, starting with how you can make bread work, based on my comment: Bread rolls often keep better than loaves, because they have a crust all round. You can often buy them singly. Demi baguettes are similar but about twice the size. Part baked rolls keep for months (sealed, once open keep in the fridge and use within a few days). You ...


3

I'm not certain from the question about what "doneness" means. Is the bread still "raw" inside at 95C? If so, I'd guess something is wrong with the calibration of the thermometer. Failing that, my guess is that this has to do with either various other external factors (e.g., the bread may be "set" inside, but the exterior is not browned sufficiently, or ...


3

When you put the dough into the banneton do you shape the dough to develop a surface tension? I have found that makes the major difference when I make sourdough bread. Here is the site I got a lot of info on shaping from. https://www.theperfectloaf.com/guides/shaping-a-boule/


3

Well I am Lebanese, and there is few small steps to make a good authentic Lebanese bread that looks like that: There is another type of bread called Saj Bread: Here is a video about it. Another type of bread is the tanour bread, where an indian tandour is used to make the bread. Well Lebanese and most of levant countries think that the tandour is their ...


2

So, I've checked some books (see below), and according to them you have two issues: (1) your finger dents aren't deep enough (puffing up), and (2) your oven is too hot. All three of the recipes I found for pide bake it at 220C. Cooking it at 400C is likely what is causing it's more pizza-like texture. The oven in the video appears to be hotter than that, ...


2

Yes. In fact, most bread recipes that use these flours have a base of white flour to which they are added.


2

Yeast fermentation slows down under refrigeration but does not stop altogether. After 10 hours, the poolish probably exhausted all of its food for the yeast. Putting it in the fridge did not accomplish much of anything afterwards. It needed to be fed again.


1

It's worth a try letting your bread rise again as you've come this far, however the chances of it coming out well aren't great. Your bread will rise as long as there is enough sugar for the yeast to consume in the dough, if the food supply is exhausted the yeast will die and your bread will collapse, and it's a strong possibility that's happened to you. ...


1

As long as you start with something very dry such as crackers, it should hold on to moisture well. Keep sealed in a refrigirator. You can also do the same trick with drying the bread in an oven and using it like that.


1

Frozen waffles. These are great in so many ways. They come in big boxes and stay good a long time. Toast some up when you need them as sauce mops. Also they make a good PB&J. 2. Corn flakes. I keep corn flakes for putting under chili or beans. 3. Pancakes. It is really easy to whip up some pancakes. Scratch pancakes are so easy if you ...


1

I couldn't say what exactly caused it, but yeast is a living organism, and recipes are based around average rising times and rising volumes. It could have been a fluke, or it could be that something in your particular combination of parameters is prone to cause this result regularly. Luckily, you don't need to know the actual cause. You can just scale down ...


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