Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Hot answers tagged

99

I'm going to agree with Szczerzo about this being an anthropologic question, but I'm going to disagree about the cause. While nomadic lifestyles was an influence, it's not causative. I'm also going to ignore the distinction made about raising agents in the OP, because it's factually incorrect; most Arab/Levantine/Turkish/Kurdish breads use yeast. Instead, ...


35

It's actually an anthropologic question. It's more due to Europe being settled down while Middle Eastern peoples were still nomadic. Raising bread, even with agents, is very hard when you move or don't have much time. For a raised bread you need a starter and few hours; for a flat bread you need a few minutes. Not to mention flat bread can be baked ON an ...


26

I don't think that it is really necessary to use your knuckles. Rather, there are ways to knead dough well, and ways to knead dough badly. I have seen ineffective people pinching the dough, or turning it between their hands, or other strange motions, which in a cargo-cult way resemble actual kneading, but don't do anything useful. My guess is that whoever ...


17

Sure, you can begin a new sour dough starter with the discard from a feeding. However, the reason for discarding isn't simply to reduce the amount. As your starter matures it also becomes much more acidic. Acidity is problematic for yeast and bacterial activity and, ultimately, the rise and flavor of your final product. So, you discard during feeding time ...


16

No, they aren't a direct substitute. Freeze dried blueberries are very dry and will absorb moisture from the dough in order to re-hydrate, frozen ones are not dried or dehydrated at all so will add water to the dough. They also have a very different consistency: thawed from frozen blueberries will be squishy and tend to get blended into the dough, dried ...


15

Assuming the pans are made for the oven (e.g. Pyrex or a similar brand), I would say no. At least, I never do. Also, unless a recipe specifically calls for it, I think you are risking overcooking the outside of the loaf, especially with glass baking dishes. If you are worried about some sort of thermal shock cracking the dish, I think this would be more ...


15

Absolutely you can. When you use the starter to make bread you make an arbitrary decision of which part of the starter you use and which to feed, the part you scoop out is just as viable as the part you keep. When you discard some instead of using it the same rule applies, so all you need to do is put some in a container and feed it the same way. You can ...


13

It's also worth mentioning that many flatbreads have a rather long storage life. For instance, the Sardinian pane carasau is split and cooked a second time so that it could be used on months long trips. It's quite possible that the different climates and jobs led to differences in bread making.


12

This may not be the primary reason but I have hot hands and my knuckles are noticeably cooler than my palms or even the insides of my fingers. It's less of an issue with dough than with pastry but I still find that kneading with my palms makes the dough sticky compared to using my knuckles.


11

Time and stretching will do the trick as well. Full on kneading or using a mixer is not necessarily required. There are other techniques, such as "stretch and fold" or "slap and fold", which are generally used with high hydration dough. Here is one example of a no-knead bread. Also, This guy is a master...if I recall correctly, none of his recipes use a ...


10

Conventionally, drying is only the first step. The second is burning it and seeing how much energy is given off. But this isn't always the best way to determine the calories that your body gets from the food, as it doesn't deal with bio-availability - basically, can your body extract that energy from the food? Diet foods often cellulose or other fiber ...


10

I would first check on the type of flour I am using. To produce breads, always use flour that contains the highest protein count. It is this protein that produces gluten, and the more of this protein the stronger the gluten. This can be called a multitude of things, from 'Strong Flour', to 'Baker's Flour', to 'Best For Bread'. Another thing you might want ...


9

In addition to what @mrwienerdog has suggested... Bread machine recipes are a distinct branch of bread recipes. Most bread recipes that you find on the internet and in cookery books assume that you are making by hand (or at least using a mixer to knead the dough). Bread machines mix and knead the dough much less thoroughly than is needed compared to "hand" ...


8

Perhaps the difference is not so much between leavened and unleavened as between flat and loaf. In colder climates, there is an existing need for a persistent fire, which has been lit for heating, as well as cooking. In those cultures, ovens and baking are more likely to arise. Even the leavened breads of the Middle East and South Asia tend to be flat, and ...


7

It will obviously not have the same flavour, but I imagine it will still taste good. It will not be a traditional Italian flavour, since cilantro is not native to Italy, but there's nothing inherently wrong with that. There is no chemical reaction that needs to happen with the basil in particular for a bruschetta so you can really top the bread with anything ...


7

Additions to GdD: You likely would get a very different look and taste even if accounting for liquid and volume. The freeze dried berries are going to usually be more concentrated in flavor, giving more a berry pop I would call it when eaten. Fresh or frozen, not so. As you mix and cook there flavor will spread along with the juice and you will loose ...


7

I can't speak for all restaurants, but those where I've been served obviously home made croutons also served similar bread with other dishes. Bread is cheap and readily available. Why would a restaurant bother doing anything more difficult? If you can get day old bread from a bakery it's even better, because that's really cheap, and works at least as well as ...


7

There are three likely causes: over-proofing, insufficient gluten development, and too loose shaping. Some combination is probably most likely. To detect over-proofing try the `poke-test': if the dough springs back immediately, the dough is under-proofed; if the indent stays as it is, the dough is over-proofed. I've found Dan Lepard's advice in The Handmade ...


6

As @Marcin stated in the comments above, there are no sources for the answers given, and many of the answers have issues: Materials, it may not be the prairie, but wheat, spelt, barley, and rye were all available and used for breads even in the ancient Middle East Resources, sure, there's less wood for ovens and flatbread cooks more quickly, but desert ...


6

FuzzyChef is correct that one reason for a multistage approach is to ensure the starter is operating "at full strength" before mixing the final dough. (And it's also important to note the imbalance of bacteria and yeast mentioned in that answer.) A lot of people don't bake bread reliably every week, and reviving a starter that's been in the fridge for ...


6

You need to increase something and time is the easiest: for 50% more weight add 50% more time is the rule of thumb for an increase up to 100%. You can also increase both temperature and time but then you should halve each so 25% hotter and 25% longer. Note: This works up to an increase of 100%. Larger than that, volume calculations come into place too.


6

You certainly don't need that much gluten for a brioche. A brioche is in fact somewhere between bread and cake, and very different in crumb from high gluten breads. 14% is not even typical bread flour, it is probably bagel flour. It will give you a gummy, resilient crumb even if you manage to bake large holes into it, while for the brioche you want cottony ...


6

I make the same Challah bread recipe every year, and mine says to bake at 350°f for 35 min and the crust is chewy but not crunchy or crisp. I've never had it under baked either.


6

Adding molasses or brown sugar will add a brown color to the dough, how much to add is a bit of a trick to get right, but it should be proportional to the amount of sugar in the dough. Most 1 lb recipes I have from American sources use about 1/3 cup of molasses. The shine might well be additional gluten added to increase the chew (two with one stone perhaps!...


6

I presume that you meant a fridge, rather than a freezer. Fridges are by design pretty dry, and the best is to cover the dough with some cling film or some other impermeable barrier. (The wet cloth will dry up pretty fast.) The dry caked surface is just dried up dough, and can be worked back into the rest. (It may need a little bit more liquids, but not ...


6

Here are a few ideas, starting with how you can make bread work, based on my comment: Bread rolls often keep better than loaves, because they have a crust all round. You can often buy them singly. Demi baguettes are similar but about twice the size. Part baked rolls keep for months (sealed, once open keep in the fridge and use within a few days). You ...


5

If you look at your videos again, you will notice that the loaves did rise a lot during the second rise in the tin. They were fully proofed and therefore the oven spring (the expansion in the oven) is minimal. Plus, they are both baking at relatively low temperatures. Bread can be baked at different stages of proofing, you may have heard of the poke test - ...


5

Best way to keep bread for a long time, more than 1 day, especially burger buns, which are more fragile than regular bread is to freeze them. Slice them open and freeze them as quickly as possible, but in a freeze bag. (edit) If your buns start having fungus after just a couple of days, maybe there is something wrong with your recipe; could you share the ...


5

The only functional reason that comes to mind is indeed the vitamin C content. Vitamin C makes for quite tough gluten, so it is frequently used in bread making. The question about the choice of acerola powder over ascorbic acid can only be answered with certainty by the person who made that choice. An obvious guess would be that it was done for marketing ...


5

Often, higher hydration doughs don't need to be mixed in a mixer at all. However, when using a mixer, it is more important to get the hydration correct, than to have all of the dough come away from the side of the bowl. I would say to use a kitchen scale to measure ingredients, and don't worry about whether or not the dough comes away from the side of the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible