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Adding any or all of your suggestions -- milk, butter, and/or eggs -- will likely soften the resulting bread. They will also cause it to remain softer for a longer period of time. But they will also tend to change the flavor and texture of your bread. If you're used to baking a crusty bread with only flour, water, yeast, and salt, the bread with enriching ...


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All in all, the solutions are either . . . Make sure you do not have too much liquid. About 9 fluid Oz's for 1.5 lb loaf. Yeast should be between 1 to 2 teaspoons for 1.5 lb loaf. The quality of gluten in your Strong Bread Flour may be poor. Add 1 teaspoon of VITAL WHEAT GLUTEN and 1 tablespoon of LEMON JUICE.


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Start with the liquid ingredients first including yeast and sugars but leave out the salt. Mix the salt with the flour. Start the machine on low and add just enough flour/salt to create a thick batter. Mix until smooth at least 3 minutes then add the remaining flour a little at a time until the dough climbs the hook. Your dough is done.


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I make naan on my BGE all the time. You can't replicate a tandoor, however, the results are very good. I find it best to cook the naan directly on the grill, and over the coals. I find lower heat is best. I either bake them at the end of a grill session, when the heat is dying, or I completely close the bottom vent (leaving the lid open...not just the lid ...


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Adding baking soda won't help you at this point, for a variety of reasons. First, it won't have any acid to react with. Technically, baking powder clears that bar, but since it fails at the next ones, it is not a reasonable alternative. Second, you won't be able to mix in the powder properly in already-kneaded dough. If you really attempted to use it, ...


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I have been making own flatbread as I too could find the soft thin and stretchy either. Using warm to hot water to mix the flour develops the gluten and that provides the stretch. Here are some recipes to play around with. *1and3/4 cups flour + 3/4 cup boiling water pinch salt oil to roll. *400g fine wholemeal flour + 150ml hot water + 1/3 cup gee I/2 tsp ...


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The thing that makes bread chewy is gluten. The easiest way to make chewier bread would probably be to use flour with a higher gluten content. You've said you don't want to "add gluten" so I'll assume that option is not on the table. For the same reason, I'll assume that replacing some of the whole wheat flour with white flour (which has a higher gluten ...


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Expectations for "shaping" can vary a lot in a recipe. Years ago, I tended toward a minimalistic shaping routine, degassing as little as necessary just to get rid of large bubbles and form the dough into the rough shape I wanted. (This was, for example, the gentle shaping promoted by Peter Reinhart, based on the idea that gentle shaping would lose less gas ...


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I understand that you can either punch or fold dough before shaping it and both have different benefits. Just understand what you're doing. During the fermentation process (rising), yeast consumes sugar and starch in the dough and turns it into alcohol, carbon dioxide, etc. That carbon dioxide collects gets trapped in the dough (thanks largely to the gluten)...


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For Neapolitan pizza, once my dough is shaped into pizza-sized balls, it rests anywhere from 30 minutes to a couple of hours. At this point I do not punch or fold! I am gentle with each ball, forming it into a disk with a combination of turns on the countertop, and gently stretching with fists under the dough. Most importantly, I find, is that I try not ...


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It's pizza dough, the shaping comes at the end, this is just dividing nothing complex is required. A bit of punching is good to get rid of any large air bubbles to make sure you divide it evenly. Remember you will be nocking a load of air out when you make the base, so it's not important to preserve lift in pizza dough in proofing.


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A cup of oats mixed with 2 cups of natural yoghurt will make a "bread" loaf in a lined tin. Paul


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Yes it does - here's the reason why: Yeast need some salt to grow properly, but they only need a very small amount (see 3rd para of intro). When you added the salt to the wet mix (sponge), you made it into a high enough concentration to inhibit the growth of the yeast, so it didn't reach the log-phase growth that you would expect when generating a sponge ...


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A basic flatbread can be made by mixing flour, a little oil (if possible) and just enough water to make it stick together. Salt is often added. No real kneading is needed, just mixing, but a little kneading helps. Then roll/pound/press flat and cook in a frying pan or on a hot stone. In Egypt I've seen something similar cooked on the side of an old ...


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Your two requirements are somewhat at cross-purpose. The minimal ingredients for a fairly typical bread are flour and water, but then you need to have several days to weeks to establish a working starter. If you are willing to have a three-ingredients bread, then your best choice is a soda bread. You only need flour, water and baking powder. The time would ...


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