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I’m pretty new to using the cast iron bread pans. I’ve seasoned my pans well prepping them before the first bread baking. On my first attempt, the bread seemed to stick a bit. Upon my second go ‘round I noticed that the bread did not seem to want to flip out after baking. I let the loaves set in the cast iron pans for about 15 minutes. Then they came out ...


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Yes, there is a lot of difference. In principle, having food prepared under different conditions while keeping some total variable the same, tend to have different outcomes - having the same outcome would be the exception, not the rule. Yeast colonies live and metabolise differently under different circumstances - imagine how people live in the Icelandic ...


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I think the difference has to do with fermentation - more fermentation, more flavor. When you are relying mostly on yeast for the rise over a short period of time, flavor that stems from fermentation doesn't really have time to develop. Less yeast + more time leads to more fermentation, more flavor. More yeast + less time leads to rising but without ...


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Yes, you can use fruit juice instead of some or all of the milk in bread pudding. As Juhasz points out, whether or not the result will "really" be bread pudding is open to debate. Since bread pudding is basically bread + custard, I looked up recipes for custard made with fruit juice and no milk. There are some custards made with fruit juice ...


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There are possibly two questions hidden in the original question: can I make a recipe that's like bread pudding but without eggs and milk? Would this be bread pudding? The second question can't be answered. You can call a dish whatever you want. I would think that most people would expect bread pudding to involve custard and bread, but it's easy to imagine ...


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We use this tool called the Nicer Slicer. It used to be big in thee fifties and we this company that makes them now.


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Short answer: No. There does not appear to be any such tradition. I got curious and googled around a bit, and couldn't find anything. That, and being from a country that could easily get to -15c in winter and 25c in summer, so if anyone would have such a tradition, I think it might be us ;-) Having said that, if OP knows of any places with such a tradition, ...


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Apart from the ease of tracking rise, I see two reasons why wider containers can have disadvantages. Increased surface area. While a lid will largely prevent drying out, there still can be some drying and. oxidation caused by the air in the container. Refrigerator space. A narrower container will use up less shelf space for the same volume, which many users ...


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Surface area. If the container is too wide, larger surface of the dough gets into contact with air. Dough can dry out, yeast/sourdough culture can behave differently (during aerobic fermentation the cells multiply, during anaerobic fermentation the yeast cells produce alcohol instead of multiplying).


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You should be fine. I would suggest using a container that creates more space between the cover and the starter. That way you won't have a mess to clean each time.


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First off, "Keto King's" bread recipe is basically an (unchanged) ripoff of Diedra's Ultimate Keto Bread version 1.0. Since version 1.0, she developed a much improved Ultimate Keto Bread v2.0. I've made that recipe probably a hundred times and have also tried tweaking many of the ingredients in order to better understand their overall effect. I can ...


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