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1

So the recipe in baker's percents: Flour 100% cold water 80% olive oil 4% salt 2% instant dry yeast 0.2% This looks like a high-hydration Sicilian-style dough that's calling for a 24 hour cold ferment (CF). As you can see in such a recipe, the yeast level is very low -- so low that you're unlikely to ...


1

Kneading gives elasticity and strength to your dough. I'm not 100% sure about pizza dough, but a brioche dough requires quite a lot of kneading, to allow for the air created by the yeast during proofing to stretch it. If it's not kneaded, it wont be able to stretch enough, and will be rather flat and dense when baked. Most doughs are usually rested at cold ...


3

High heat gives you the hard crust. You need to bake at different temperatures: an initial high one just enough to generate the rise, followed by a lower temperature to dry out the interior. I bake 5" Pullman bread. With my convection oven, my inital temperature is 160ºC for 11 minutes, followed by 140ºC for 30 minutes and then 65-70 minutes at 120ºC. ...


3

In a commercial bakery Pain de mie would be baked in a sealed tin. I think it is a similar bread to the `Pullman loaf', which is baked in a special Pullman tin. (Easy to find a picture on the web.) This minimizes crust formation. More generally, domestic ovens, particularly fan ovens, are designed to cook food in a dry environment. Low humidity means heat ...


0

My banana bread/cake calls for 2 cups of mashed bananas. I use 1 cup mashed ripe bananas (the riper the sweeter) and 1 cup mango puree (strained to remove strings). It comes out very moist.


1

I have no experience with bread machines, but plenty of experience with making bread by hand, and using a mixer with a dough hook. Bread typically falls if you haven't baked it enough, if you haven't kneaded it enough, or if you haven't used strong flour. It's very difficult to diagnose the issue you're facing without more info, but here's my best educated ...


1

This is a hard problem to diagnose. There are many things that can cause this, and trying to figure out which it is (or even if it's the same each time) can cause you to tear out your hair in frustration. Even so, they all basically boil down to the bread rising too fast and then collapsing. (Sure. And all my money problems are caused by expenditures ...


8

In addition to what @mrwienerdog has suggested... Bread machine recipes are a distinct branch of bread recipes. Most bread recipes that you find on the internet and in cookery books assume that you are making by hand (or at least using a mixer to knead the dough). Bread machines mix and knead the dough much less thoroughly than is needed compared to "hand" ...


9

I would first check on the type of flour I am using. To produce breads, always use flour that contains the highest protein count. It is this protein that produces gluten, and the more of this protein the stronger the gluten. This can be called a multitude of things, from 'Strong Flour', to 'Baker's Flour', to 'Best For Bread'. Another thing you might want ...


7

There are three likely causes: over-proofing, insufficient gluten development, and too loose shaping. Some combination is probably most likely. To detect over-proofing try the `poke-test': if the dough springs back immediately, the dough is under-proofed; if the indent stays as it is, the dough is over-proofed. I've found Dan Lepard's advice in The Handmade ...


0

I bake breads that are usually a 50/50 mix of unbleached bread flour and spelt, rye, oat or kamut whole grain flours. I may have to adjust the whole grain flour amounts (especially kamut) and add gluten, but I always use honey in place of sugar on a 1:1 basis. I never reduce the temperature. The same 1:1 substitution applies on the occasions that I do make ...


1

For home cooked bagels, save the malt for the dough, about a tbsp for 4 bagels works for me or 270 g flour 150 g water, and just put a tsp or two of baking soda plus a tbsp of salt in the water bath. I do 15 sec on each side, no more no less. Just made a batch this morning but had to leave out the malt (use malted milk in a pinch), but adding other flavors ...


0

So many opinions. My experience, even after doing an excellent bread-making course, is.. as long as you understand the principles then whatever works for you is fine... and make sure you have fun! I have scored over-proofed loaves that simply collapse as a result and have decided that if I let it proof a little too long it's better not to score as it won't ...


0

I bake bread frequently and store it upright on the cut end on my breadboard. It's a crusty loaf and the crust will get soft if wrapped. It doesn't last long in our house so long term storage isn't a problem. There is a way to restore the crisp exterior if you must wrap it in plastic. Preheat oven to 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Sprinkle a little water on the ...


0

Preheat your oven Along with a covered Dutch oven, then bake in the covered Dutch oven for half of the recommended time and uncover for the latter half to crisp and color your bread.


5

I have marked George M's answer as the accepted answer, but I thought I would post a slightly expanded answer. I can confirm that the following ideas that were raised in the comments did not work: Hotter oven Cooking longer Cooling completely What has worked is to wrap the bread completely in a tea towel or two until completely cool. Then, the bread ...


3

I've since figured it out. Gluten free bread is very particular, and the moisture has to be just right. If there's not enough water, the dough is too dense and won't rise. If there's too much water, it will rise, but in the oven, the bubbles bubble through the too, causing the loaf to collapse (I sat and stared and watched it happen). I've since learned what ...


4

"Bread machine flour" and "bread flour" are interchangeable terms. Bread flour, sometimes called bread machine flour, is what most bread maker recipe books will say to use in order to achieve the best results. (Source) So yes, you should use bread flour in the recipe. It has higher protein than all-purpose flour and will help your bread rise better and ...


0

As above poster says, but I add liquids in first, which includes yeast starter. I never get a good a rise if I just added yeast to flour , I really need a good activation in a jug of water.


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