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4

There are two carb count, total carbs (including fibre) and net carbs (excluding fibre). There are also two types of fibre and they are not always noted in the labelling, although that's mostly irrelevant for this question. Another parameter that changes is the "serving size", in your example you can get 0.5g of net carbs if your serving size is 5g ...


3

The amount of yeast you use heavily depends on your proving time, and vice-versa. You can use either amount, but your proving time will be vastly different. As highlighted in this recipe the fermentation time gets longer the less yeast you use. Basically the yeast rises the bread, and the more yeast you use, the quicker it can get it done (like an increased ...


3

After comparing the old paddles to new replacement paddles, all of them original OEM pieces from Zojirushi made specifically for the BB-PAC20, I believe the flat parts of the paddle cylinders deformed, spread around the inside until it was smooth and nearly round. When I placed the new paddles on the posts, I found that they were a little looser than the old ...


3

Yes you do have to reduce all ingredients proportionally for the dough to come out the same. The best way to measure for baking is by weight in grams rather then in volume as weight in grams is extremely accurate and makes for much easier adjustments like those you need to make. The most critical measurements to get right are the flour and the liquid ...


0

No "kneed" for a bread maker! You can also make bread by using a dutch oven. An example and recipe can be found here - https://www.lecreuset.com/dutch-oven-bread/LCR-2091.html The bread is easy and delicious!


0

It depends on your bread maker and paddle design. I have a very old one that I keep as a backup which has a flat paddle design that breaks the bread no matter what. But newer designs should come out cleanly, and in fact should stay in the bread maker when the bread is removed. But even on the newer, better designs, as the anti-stick coating wears away, the ...


0

I've used three different bread makers over the last 20 or so years. I make all our family's sandwich bread, and sometimes I make raisin cinnamon bread as a treat. We are a family of 5 with 3 now teenage boys, and I average a loaf a day. Those are all big 2lb loaves. Long ago, before I had a bread maker, I made a loaf by hand. It takes a lot of time. The ...


3

From my comment It depends which way up the 'plug' & 'cup/socket' are. If the 'cup' faces down, you ate it. if it faces up, you probably washed it down the sink when you cleaned it. Pictures would help. After pictures added… You ate it. It's very unlikely to do you any harm.


5

Yes, you're calculating it right, it's the flour that makes the difference. Hydration percent will give you a different result with different flours. Gluten content and grain type and grind (i.e. fine vs course) all influence how much water a dough will absorb. You are using white AP (i.e. plain) flour which has a lower gluten content than bread flour, if ...


14

Hydration is an idea to help you predict the dough consistency/workability based on the ratio of water to flour - but with a highly enriched dough, the effect of the additional ingredients is so strong, that it loses its predictive value. It is also no longer perfectly defined when you have ingredients which make the dough softer without clearly being water/...


2

The blackness in Russian black bread comes from rye and black molasses. It will not have the right flavour if you don't use fennel. I never use white flour... only rye and it is an overnight wait before any kneading. Obviously I am not giving you the whole recipe here but there is a strange ingredient... onions. True Russian black bread has no cocoa or ...


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