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5

I've had the same issue at home, with a very hard or burnt crust bottom: I've made the following adjustments through experimentation. This will help greatly, but might not fix the problem entirely. I routinely preheat my empty dutch oven in the oven set to 500F with the lid on. When baking, I take it down a notch to 475F. I take a few steps before I place ...


0

Sneftel's answer is excellent. These starter cultures just keep improving the more they are used, even over very long periods of time (epigenetics). All of the best ones I've tasted are ancient ones I bought off the internet. Eventually I've thrown them all away because the only one I ever want to use is the famous Ischia culture.


1

I had similar issues with a horrible chemical smell no matter what brand I purchased. A friend suggested fresh baked as an alternative. Really simple and it solved my issues.


6

Yes, rising is very dependent on gluten. In almost all cases, you won't get any rising without a gluten-rich flour. Even if you use wheat flour, but one that has the wrong proportion of gluten, you will get a disappointing rise. If you were to try making a bread recipe calling for AP flour (8-10% gluten) with bagel flour (14-15% gluten) or a recipe for bread ...


6

What you've got there is a mix of precipitated proteins from the wort (the "trub") mixed with Saccharomyces cerevisiae spores, and also various compounds from the hops. It's on the bottom of the beer because you're making an ale; only lagers have the yeast floating on the top, and then only during active fermentation. Taste a bit. Then drink something to ...


1

Scrape at it with your fingernail. Flour will come off in a... floury manner, revealing the cranny it was stuck in. Mold won't be limited to the crannies. Also, it'll appear on the cut surface before it appears on the crust. Additionally, it'll be different from the color of the flour (in the same area of the loaf). FWIW, that's definitely flour on most of ...


1

You won't get apple-tasting bread by using apples. What you think of as "taste" is actually the aroma of the apple, and has little to do with the taste buds. A whole fresh apple tastes of apples. If you put pieces of an apple in the dough, it is already a large amount of dough to a smaller amount of apple (your bread would fall apart if you were to use more ...


5

I suggest that (in addition to using a reduction of the juice*/cider) you add some solid apple. Personally I would get dried apple, of a tasty variety if at all possible, and put it through a food processor until fairly fine. I dehydrate my own home-grown apples, selected for flavour, but would buy Cox or Granny Smith for this. Then add as you would other ...


1

Bread does not have to be made with milk, in fact that is rare - bread is usually made with water. You could substitute apple cider for milk for a much stronger apple flavor, my concern with that approach is the sugar you are adding (apple cider is very sweet) for 2 reasons: Yeast is retarded by sugar, so a lot of sugar will inhibit your yeast growth. Many ...


3

In the book Advanced Bread and Pastry, Michael Suas outlines three methods that he recommends to professional bakers (but also applicable at home) for freezing bread at various stages, roughly in decreasing order of quality: Par-baked process. The bread or rolls are prepared normally and baked normally, but for a shorter amount of time (just until the ...


2

I don't freeze large loaves often, but I freeze homemade bagels regularly, and baguettes or small batards occasionally. My personal preference is to freeze after the bread is baked and fully cooled; mostly to avoid dealing with any yeast issues related to freezing raw dough. Just wrap it in plastic wrap if you're only going to store it for a few days. For ...


1

I would freeze the dough before the second proof. And when you’re going to bake it, you can first defrost in the fridge and let it rise at room temperature before baking. This way you also ensure that your yeast is alive if it rises after being frozen.


6

AFAIK it's really difficult to knead dough with a hand mixer even if it comes equipped with dough hooks. I was in your shoes a while ago too and after some research, found that it's basically useless for kneading dough. Unless you're Popeye, you're not going to be able to hold the mixer and the bowl steady enough for the dough to get kneaded. I ended up ...


7

Methods, from best to worst (assuming the bread is in a sealed plastic bag): Freezing Room temperature Refrigerating According to the FAQs for Dave's Killer Bread, which does not use preservatives: Q: How should I store my bread? A: The best way to store your bread is on your counter or in a bread box at room temperature. Take care to keep your ...


23

Milk does create gluten1 when combined with flour. The water in the milk does create a gluten structure. If it didn't, any bread made with milk would be dense and flat. But the dinner rolls I made yesterday (with no water, only milk) were light and airy. Milk clearly creates gluten. Note that gluten isn't only about elasticity. Beginning bread makers ...


11

Let's start with what Gluten development actually is. It's the process of developing the protein in flour, gluten, into a web that traps air into it. Water is essential for this web, and as you mention 87% of milk is water. However, 3% of milk (whole milk, at least) is fat. This fat will coat the gluten molecules, preventing them from being shaped into a ...


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