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This is not strictly an answer but I though I would add this (I have no problem removing this answer if it is too off topic). One thing I do when baking bread is combining equal amounts of flour and yeast to make a kind of pancake batter that can rise overnight and then I incorparate the rest of the flourer in the morning. One needs to lower the amount of ...


1

It's not a method suitable for home baking, but the bread used to make Panko breadcrumbs is cooked by passing an electric current through it and forms without a crust. You can see the apparatus used and the finished product in this YouTube video: https://youtu.be/uFbQuHE4z7g


4

This is a supplementary answer. There are apps for calculating the ingredients for overnight rise. For example, I use PizzApp which has yeast ratios for long rises, either at room temp or refrigerated. Sometimes this means adding 0.5g of yeast to a recipe, but it works. There are similar apps for bread making, but I haven't used one so I can't recommend ...


15

There are no strict formulas or conversions, the mathematics of bread baking are too complex for such predictions. Rising at room temperature overnight is not recommended, it is generally way too warm in our homes. The thing you can do is to take any recipe you have, and stick it in the fridge as-is, either for the first or for the second proofing. It should ...


2

It should be fine. There is no reason it won't grow at lower sugar content, though there is a possibility that it has slightly slower growth under lower sugar levels, due to optimization of the metabolism for the more bio-available sugars. All the information that has been is saying is that if you have a relatively high sugar content in your bread, then use ...


0

Bread pectin. About a teaspoon per cup of flour. You can buy it from Pacific Pectin - a wonderful company. They sell it in smaller quantities than what it says on the website but you have to call them. https://pacificpectin.com/product/pacific-bread-pectin/


2

For dough storage at fridge temp it is best to refrigerate immediately after kneading, but you can also do so at more or less any time during rising. Storing immediately after kneading will allow you to keep the dough for 2-3 days before you need to use it. It will slowly start to rise over this time, and the rising process is the limitation on the storage ...


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I have made thousands of batches of bread dough, both at home and professionally. Stickiness is all about hydration (the ratio of water to flour), with a bit of effect by way of fat content, but that is usually so low as to not be a noticeable reason. A good, basic bread dough does not have to be sticky. (Some, such as the best English muffin dough I have ...


0

Looking at the JC recipe, it is not a high-hydration dough meaning as it is only 65% water or so. As others have said, weigh the ingredients and use quality ingredients like King Arthur flour. Do not make substitutions at this stage. KAF Bakers hotline is also helpful and they know their recipes and ingredients. Use them.


1

The main ingredient of Bread is TIME ...and good measuring Good bread needs time. Time for the yeast to provide air. Good bread "goes" at times more than it is in the oven! A good mix I have learned from a baker that gives a dough that isn't runny I found is working for most sorts of flour. It's simple: one cube of fresh yeast 300 ml warm water. 1 ...


2

You might try keeping your hands wet instead of dusting them with flour. I've used wet hands to fold extremely wet bread dough.


2

Stop adding more flour, and give the dough time to do its thing My Dad (a retired professional baker) always swears by the "Mix everything to a sloppy mess, then go do something else for 15 minutes" method. Basically, you add all the ingredients, mix by hand if it's just about manageable, or with a spoon if it isn't, then leave it for 15-30 mins ...


6

Letting the flour absorb the water can mean a few things depending on the exact method, but it's usually good, and can be done before adding the yeast (and any other ingredients). That may help. The same dough can seem liquid and perfect with nothing in between except time (or firm and perfect, especially with lots of wholewheat flour). I start in the stand ...


16

There are many potential causes, it is impossible to say which one (or maybe multiple ones) is the problem in your case. Wrong measuring. The only way to exclude that for sure is to start baking by weight. Wrong flour. You mention that you are in the southern US, I have some vague memory reading that they use bread terms a bit differently. Look at your ...


6

This is almost certainly Brioche con Gelato, which is Brioche, a sweet and rich bread with gelato a rich ice-cream made with whole milk and sugar.


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Fruit and nuts can potentially soak up some of the liquid. The liquid is then removed from the hydration of the bread during rising/proving, so you might end up with a mix that is too dry to form a loaf or that is unable to be kneaded properly or to rise properly. Adding the fruit and nuts after some mixing and kneading means that there is much less ...


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