New answers tagged

3

I normally make a full batch of pitta, freeze most of it and then defrost using the toaster. Contrary to Joshua Engel's answer, I've never had any trouble with the pitta toasting rather than defrosting; for contexts where I want pitta I'm happy for it to be hot. My toaster has a 'defrost' setting which I think reduces the heat intensity, and I'll typically ...


0

As you can probably tell, 2 whole eggs consists more liquid than just 2 egg yolks. Many sources recommend replacing 3 eggs yolks for 2 whole eggs, while many other sources recommend replacing 2 egg yolks for one whole egg. Since the recipe calls for 2 egg yolks, it would, of course, be more convenient to use the 2 egg-yolks to one whole egg ratio. But since ...


0

I love how Lisa started her answer - you can, but there will be consequences. I am not sure there will be that much problem with the hydration. Additional egg whites don't make dough as liquid as water or milk does, and 40 g extra egg whites are probably not going to do that much to the dough consistency, if you are not working with tiny amounts of flour. ...


1

Let's put it this way - you can, but there will be consequences, so you probably shouldn't. Bread dough that behaves like you expect it to depends on a given amount of liquid for a given amount of flour. Using whole eggs instead of just the yolks called for increases the liquid, so you'll have a runnier dough while its raw, making it harder to knead, so then ...


3

There's a great article written by Gareth Busby. It explains how the protein content of the flour is related to the amount of water required - a 1 gram increase in protein equates to an additional 2.5% of hydration. You can use the recommendations alongside the Hammelman's recommendations shown above. I like his stuff because he breaks down complicated ...


2

Elizabeth David's English Bread and Yeast Cookery (from the 1980s) recommends warming flour before bread baking. Besides revolutionizing the cooking in her country, she was a thorough food historian, and she quoted older sources (1930s) that recommended doing it, at least in a bakery setting. I always warm my flour before making bread because she ...


-1

I still consider myself a novice at bread baking. One point that I keep coming across is that home ovens are designed to vent steam but we want a moist environment in order to prevent the crust from setting too early before the bread has a chance to expand (and probably a few other reasons). A common and effective way is to bake the bread inside another ...


0

I don't think that egg-wash is your only option, as brushing with milk should also work. After brushing with milk, you can follow the below steps to ensure a sift crust: Brush with butter after baking Wrap the loaf in plastic wrap while it cools to retain moisture Just a note, a Pullman loaf pan might come in handy when making bread with a soft crust: ...


4

I would avoid anything that can't have a good wash. I've had wooden bread bins in the past and crumbs in crevices can go mouldy and spread the mould to bread until you give up and throw the bread bin away These days I either use the enamelled cast iron pot I bake in (and which therefore fits my boules perfectly) or a plastic box that originally held a lot ...


2

They stop it drying out quite so fast, not much else as far as I can tell. There may be some small benefit from the interior being dark, but not really one I could categorically state would be helpful. I would never re-use plastic bags for bread, though, unless you wash & dry between uses, otherwise any beginnings of mould will just proliferate & ...


1

Brings be back to the time I gave my first answer: What are these white spots in my bread dough? The logic is pretty similar. If it's hard, it mostly like is a case of grain stuck or a lump of dry dough in the bread. If it's soft, mold is possibly the reason. But even if you didn't tell us it's hard, simply by judging from the image, it appears to be some ...


1

The egg wash is very important for the crust of your buns. Different types of glazes and egg washes produce different results on bread's (or pastry's) crust, due to the combinations of proteins, fats, and sugars they contain. I would guess that one of two things is the problem with a milk glaze. In your case, the baking temperature is too high for a milk ...


3

I'd go with grain or more likely flour/unmixed dough It's very unlikely to be mould in between slices like that, even if pre-sliced, and essentially impossible if you just cut it. Bread is also generally made and shipped pretty quickly, so if it's got a few days left on its date (or was bought loose, meaning it should have been freshly baked) it shouldn't ...


0

Probably also not a complete answer (can there ever be for such questions?), but the main criteria for me with a focus on bread would be (in no particular order): Maximum temperature. For bread, 250°C is usually good, but speaking from experience, the step from bread to pizza is small and for those, the hotter the better. Sturdy rails and racks. I bake my ...


0

The most important thing is that your oven can maintain a humid environment. Features such as vents, designed to reduce the odour of cooking food when you open the oven door, are therefore undesirable. Some people say that this makes fan ovens unsuitable, but at least in the UK, most new ovens are fan ovens (and often the fan cannot be disabled) and people ...


0

This is borderline opinion based but I'll take a shot. I have used fan and non fan ovens to bake bread, and you can get excellent results either way. When I used a fan only oven I would typically make an air diverter out of tin foil to keep the fan from blowing directly on the bread, which worked really well. I also used a large ceramic coated cast iron pot ...


3

You can make bread that has some of the properties of sourdough without the full "starter" treatment. It won't be the same, of course, but it might fit the criteria you're looking for. One option is to use sour ingredients, like greek yogurt, such as in this recipe. Another option is to use a poolish, which is sort of like a sourdough starter that ...


5

There are prepackaged portions of sour dough starter available in most grocery stores. They have a shelf life of a few months and don't need to be fed if not opened. This is just one of a couple variants that are available in my next grocery store. As with every sour dough starter you can just feed it to grow the colony, then use half of it and keep the ...


9

I would recommend you find a (hobby) baker locally. Almost everyone who maintains a sourdough has some extra that they would otherwise discard. I have read about local Facebook groups etc. of people sharing their starters during the pandemic (when sourdough suddenly was “a thing” and weirdly enough yeast was hard to get at times), including contact-less ...


6

It's really not that much of a time commitment. Once you get it going, there are ways to store it (fridge, freezer, dehydrated) so that you can keep it long-term, with limited upkeep. Of course, it will always need care and feeding to get it active again. Short of that, the solution to your problem is to find a friend with an active starter. It is easy to ...


1

I tried the original recipe once more and the texture was almost like the original recipe: Here are the changes I've made this time: I followed the recipe to the letter this time, not substituting oat milk for regular milk and instant yeast for fresh yeast as suggested. The other change I made was when rolling and shaping the dough, last time I baked the ...


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