A message from our CEO about the future of Stack Overflow and Stack Exchange. Read now.
14

Spices or egg do not get absorbed into chicken, or any other protein in any significant manner given any safe amount of time Some amount of sodium from a brine will get absorbed, but this is generally for different reasons, and is not a requirement for crumbed chicken The easiest and safest method is to dredge in flour, dip in egg, dredge in crumbs, and ...


13

160C sounds about right for cooking oil temp. I typically shallow fry on the stovetop for about 10-12 minutes for the thighs and then transfer them to a 175C oven to finish cooking (if needed) and then repeat with the breasts. I would stay away from "battering" if you are looking to replicate something like popeye's. A few things I do to ensure a nice thick ...


7

In general, when battering, wet sticks to dry and dry sticks to wet, but they don't stick to themselves. Thus, if starting with wet food, like meat, the process is usually: flour (dry, sticks to the meat, which is wet) eggs (wet, sticks to the flour, which is dry) crumbs (dry, sticks to the eggs, which are wet) If you have a wet layer right next to wet ...


6

The flour as the first dredging step does help the rest of the breading stick. Think traction. It gives the egg something to hold on to, which then holds on to the breadcrumbs. You're right, the vast majority of recipes that call for this kind of breading call for a three step process. That's because it works better. I've done it with and without the initial ...


5

This has been answered in a related question : https://cooking.stackexchange.com/a/13878/67 So, to sumarize & relate to your current situation : don't mix your coating together, as you want seperate alternating layers of wet & dry. Your typical breading for chicken is: flour, cornstarch, or some other dry powder, possibly mixed with salt, herbs ...


5

The three step method should work for this. This being dredge the cooked chicken in flour, then egg wash and finally the bread crumbs(ideally Panko bread crumbs). The other way is to do a tempura batter. But to make sure the tempura batter is effective, make sure to dredge the chicken in flour first. Good Luck, I will be doing this soon and I can give ...


5

One trick to get the really awesome crunchy coating is to add some buttermilk to your flour mixture and mix it up briefly with your fingers. That way you are getting little balls of flour mixture sticking to the outside of your chicken that turn into the super crunchy layer when fried.


5

Try either a higher oven temperature or more time. Probably higher temperature, unless your chicken was undercooked. Browning occurs above 212F (the boiling point of water), so it won't start until the moisture (eggs and milk) has cooked off of the outside of the chicken. You may also want to let the milk/egg mixture drip off of the chicken a little (so it ...


5

Sodium Citrate is the most common emulsifier for cheese, it keeps it soft and flexible when cold, and like a smooth sauce when hot. Being an emulsifier it stops it separating too See http://modernistcuisine.com/recipes/sodium-citrate-creates-silky-smooth-macaroni-and-cheese/ You can make Sodium Citrate at home, heat a tbs of lemon juice, add 1/2+ tsp of ...


5

It depends on the final texture you want to achieve. There are tempura recipes that call for flour->batter->breadcrumbs (panko) [thanks @catija!]. You can omit the initial flour layer if you're able to create a dry enough surface for the batter to adhere to. You can even omit the final breadcrumb layer (this is the tempura that I'm used to). Batters (...


5

The best thing to do is to season the tofu itself (after pressing & drying it). I'm going to use a bunch of example fried fish recipes here, but the same principles apply to tofu, or frankly anything you coat and fry. Many recipes for breaded and fried whatever have you season the flour or the batter, and not the item. This is generally a mistake, ...


4

This works every time: dredge in the seasoned flour (a teaspoon each of oregano, dill, onion, garlic, ginger and paprika) dredge in an egg/sour cream mixture dredge in the panko This method should work great for your schnitzel.


4

Reheating fried food is extremely challenging. The least bad method is probably baking in a slow oven, about 250-300 F. You want to reheat only enough to get the food warm enough to enjoy, but not so piping hot that it would trigger additional browning. At these low temperatures, you should not get too much additional browning, although you will never ...


4

Most fried chicken (Church's and Popeyes) is NOT made in a pressure cooker. THAT is the provence of the greasy stuff known as KFC:-) Batter mix and chicken must be ice cold, oil temperature should be at 340 degrees. Dip 2 identical pieces of chicken in lots of flour and press hard on the pieces to coat. Rap the two pieces together gently to remove excess ...


4

Here are a few ideas which might help: Toss the meat in some flour first, then put it in the sauce, then breadcrumb it. The flour will help everything stick better I haven't seen your honey sauce recipe, but if you can incorporate an egg or egg yolk in it, give it a go: it will work with the flour to make the sauce far stickier for the crumbs and you won't ...


4

Some recipes call for dipping the chicken in egg before coating with flour while others call for milk (or butter milk). Egg provides a lot more protein and will produce a thicker, more stable crust. Milk is obviously much thinner, contains much more water, and won't cling to the meat as much. Buttermilk is a cultured product that's thicker than plain ...


4

I don't think there are special considerations for the actual breading procedure. I think the most important considering is to individually freeze the breaded chicken strips. I'd place them on parchment, on a sheet pan, and freeze them. Then after they are frozen, bag them for later use. IQF (individually quick frozen) pieces are less likely to stick ...


3

Breading chicken usually involves three stages: Dip the chicken in flour to provide a uniform surface for egg to stick to Dip it in an egg mixture Dip it into bread crumbs or some other coarse, dry coating that will be the final texture. Obviously the oil would not work in stages 1 or 3 because it could not be well distributed and would clump. It is easy ...


3

The comments have already touched on a number of potential solutions. The core problem seems to be that you need a thicker, more viscous batter than can hold onto the cornflakes better than raw egg. Egg is slippery stuff, and will tend to form only a very thin layer on whatever's being dipped into it, but you want something much denser here. In the recipe ...


3

The only way you are going to soften the corn meal in the breading is to let it get a bit soggy. Store it in a plastic container in the fridge overnight and let it's own moisture do the job. If the result you get is good then great, if the skin isn't good after that then just peel it off and eat the chicken.


3

The longer you let the flour/breadcrumb mixture set on the chicken before cooking, the more the gluten network will set up, which will improve adherence to the meat, as well as make the breading stay intact as a shell. The issue is that when you cook the meat, the breading and meat expand at different rates and are pulled apart. A longer set time will make ...


2

Some of the more volatile organic compounds in stuff like Tabasco will burn very quickly. The fact that you still say that it looks burned when just using flour leads me to suspect that the temperature of the oil is staying too hot? Or perhaps the pieces are too big and need to be cooked for too long? A simple coating for chicken is 4 part plain flour 1 ...


2

I have usually failed in making a good fried chicken in the past because it always ends up boring and tasting like home made, and not in a good sense! A few days ago I was looking for recipe's to replicated KFC and came across a few, so far I have only tried one. It totally failed! It was an eggwash with buttermilk that you dipped in a plain flour and ...


2

Be sure to pat the fish dry as completely as you can. Don't salt the fish beforehand to avoid drawing out any moisture. Also, like Frankie suggested, dip the fish slowly into the oil. Dipping it slowly allows some of the initial moisture to escape and lets the batter cling to the fish before there's a shell of batter holding in all the moisture.


2

On fish I seen people coat it in yellow Mustard, I kid you not, then breadcrumb, flour it. The mustard can’t be tasted after cooking. Given how light a taste fish is, wonder if it would work on chicken?


2

You have to get the chicken "tacky". It's great to soak it in buttermilk for a while, let the buttermilk drip off and then bread the chicken. You can also use egg. Some people use flour, then egg, then breading. It all works, but somehow the chicken needs to be sticky for breading like you describe to stick.


2

Entirely different texture due to different proportions. Through standard crumbing technique you're getting an even, thin crusty layer of what is mostly crumbs, with a small amount of egg. If you make a mix you can dip the meat in, you'll need to use some 3x as much egg, and you get a smooth texture more resembling a corn-dog. If you mix crumbs and egg in ...


2

I would freeze the chick first, individually. Egg & Bread them after freezing will make the stuff stick and it will generally freeze quickly. Then you can place them back in the freezer. It should be a quick process so you won't thaw the meat while doing this. And what Andy said. I do this with my poppers, freezing them makes the breading stick better.


2

Try removing the chicken from the buttermilk, dipping in egg wash (literally just whisked eggs), dip in flour/breadcrumbs/panko (or a combo of the three), then in the egg wash, then back in the flour and then onto a plate until ready to cook. You just need more binder between your chicken and the first layer of breadcrumbs. Eggs form a protein structure ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible