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19

My suggestion would be if you don't like the taste don't buy the fish in the first place, however if you have bought fish and then found out it's too strong a flavor there are a few things you can do: A squeeze of lemon: acidity is a well known and frequently used way to cut fatty, oily flavors Sugar rub: coating the flesh with some sugar and letting it sit ...


7

I work on a gillnet boat in Alaska for a few weeks each summer. Here are some tips: Get the freshest fish you can. I know you asked about the curing process specifically, but it all starts here. Anything you do after this is just masking any off flavors. The older it is the more fishy and strongly flavored it becomes. If you can find it get fish that has ...


2

Excellent question. The salt, through osmosis, takes humidity out of the meat. Less moisture leads to a denser product. About meat: The main structural component of the muscle fibers in meat is myofibril, which is itself composed of thick and thin filaments. Higher-than-normal levels of salt cause these filaments to swell and separate from one ...


2

In a brine, I would simply toss in the whole thing, stem and leaves, for parsley. In fact, parsley stems are quite flavorful. Thyme benefits from a bit of bruising to release the aroma and flavor. So, I would roughly strip the leaves, not worrying too much if some stem was included.


2

There are five treatments to process olives: Water cured, brine cured, dry salt cured, lye cured, and lye cured fermented. The main objective when curing olives is to leach out the oleuropein, which is the bitter compound found in fresh olives, and to ferment them, which improves the flavor and, of course, improves the shelf life. It sounds like you are ...


2

Why do you want to brine it? First, there really is no such thing as dry brining. It is salting. When brining, however, only salt and water penetrates. The result is a moister end product, but, depending on how long you brine, it can also change the texture. Some people enjoy brined proteins, others don't. Brining can also be used as a crutch in potential ...


1

Thanks for your reply. I think I may have found the answer here. Apparently you can sous vide pickles to pasteurize them, and then leave them packed in vinegar so no bacteria can grow. As I read this, salt is just a flavoring agent here. https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/make-crisp-flavor-packed-pickles-on-the-quick Now, is there a way to make corned ...


1

Greg Blonder has the best information that I've found on the effects of brining and marinating. In fact, the "food myths" section of his website, has a lot of objective food science. There are several links that are pertinent to your questions. You can see here, that Blonder uses dye to illustrate the effect of brining. He concludes that brining is almost ...


1

Like the other response said, keep your jars out in a warm spot in your home. I am in California too. Ferments do really well at 72 degrees and over. The colder your temperature, your ferment will take longer. Like CA winters can be cold, relatively, and my pickles and green tomatoes take a over month and a half for full sour. In the summers, I can turn out ...


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