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13

Well there is good news and bad news. The good news is, if you keep cooking it, the proteins will eventually break down and the meat will get softer. The bad news is, the boiling for so long may have spent the goodness of the meat. More good news however. The meaty goodness has likely been transferred to the broth. You could convert your dish to a small ...


12

Chewy means undercooked. Most of your standard "barbecue cuts" of meat contain a lot of connective tissue. This must be rendered to achieve tenderness. This goes for brisket, pork butt, and ribs, to name a few. If you are using the words "chewy" or "tough" to describe the texture of your meat, in nearly all cases it has not been cooked enough. Your time/...


9

From what I can tell you're generally on the right track here. From what you've said, there are probably just a few issues. tough/dry/rough. Believe it or not not cooking long enough could be the problem here. You want your brisket to get in that 190-200 range, this will cause the connective tissue to break down and make it very nice. The other possibility ...


6

Smoke first, then sous vide. There are a few reasons as to why you could smoke first: (i) It has been shown that cold food/meat will take on smoke flavor better than warm meat (Source: AmazingRibs) (ii) If you do sous vide and then smoke, you might risk overcooking the meat since the temperature in your smoker can run higher than your sous vide. Doing ...


6

Typically brines are for tenderizing and penetrating flavour into the meat. The use of the brine would be to break down the tough meat Though a sous vide does tenderize mildly with the long cooking time you stated, you don't want to over cook it, hence the brine. Nor would the sous vide alone add as much flavour as the 2 week brine. The brine is more ...


5

I apologize in advance if I miss any of your key points, but I will do my best to address them. First, on the color of the meat -- brisket will be brown, but may have a red and/or pink smoke ring around the edges. It can be difficult, sometimes impossible, to achieve with a gas or electric smoker. Regardless, the smoke ring is strictly a cosmetic quality, ...


5

Your brisket was undercooked, not overcooked. At the temperatures you stated, rule of thumb for brisket cooking time is about 1.25-1.5 hours per pound. Convection may drop that down a tad. A 7.5 pound brisket should be cooked for at least 8 hours, and could be closer to 10 or so. The cuts of meat that are designated as "barbecue" meats are generally full of ...


5

Here is a good basic technique for smoking brisket. The important points are to smoke it until it reaches an internal temperature of about 160 F, then wrap in foil. The meat won't absorb any more smoke flavor at that point anyway, and the foil will protect it from drying out during the rest of the cooking process. You can add a little bit of liquid inside ...


4

Convenience: It's more convenient and easier to monitor the temperature inside the home. The oven has a thermostat, where the grill temperature needs to be monitored and adjusted manually. No smoke left: Is could be assumed that the smoke has been exhausted. Too much smoke: The smoke flavor could become too strong if finished on the grill.


4

Serious Eats describes pork brisket this way: Pork brisket is simply a substantial part of a boned-out picnic ham. Although ham generally refers to a cured/cooked product, "picnic ham" here refers to the lower part of the pork shoulder: Guide to Pork Cuts ... Pork Picnic Shoulder This comes from the lower part of the pig's shoulder. It'...


4

Well, I might as well answer my own question. After 4 hours holding inside of a beer cooler, wrapped in towels, the internal temperature of my brisket went from 200 down to 146. I have read that 140 is the danger zone for bacteria growth. So I turned on my oven to 200 and placed the brisket (still wrapped in foil) in for the remaining two hours. By the time ...


4

The reduction or elimination of pathogens in cooked food is not simply a factor of temperature, but a factor of temperature AND time. Lower temps typically mean longer cooks. This changes the texture of the final product. Sometimes to the point that people find it unpleasant to eat. You will need to factor in the thickness of the cut, and the desired ...


4

That is not a problem. If you are just lifting the bag, adding an ingredient, and returning it to the water it should not be an issue. You are not going to change the temperature in that amount of time. In this scenario I would suggest a ziploc freezer bag, rather than vacuum sealing, so maybe even double bagged. Normally for a long cook, I would ...


3

Most brisket I've seen in the UK is flat, although I've seen point as well occasionally. The recipe should work fine for both unless you have a really thick point. With a thick point you could cut it the long way to increase its surface area, or cook it a bit longer. You won't go wrong cooking it lower and slower in any case.


3

Black garlic is not a substitute for regular garlic, you add black garlic to get a different result. I would never say use 2 cloves of black garlic for every 1 regular or any other ratio because the changes are so fundamental that they really are totally different ingredients. The question is how much black garlic flavor you want, and only you can answer ...


3

There's really no reason to move the brisket into the oven aside from convenience and ease of temperature control, with the contrasting point also being true that there's no rule that says you have to leave your meat on the grill for the entire cook. After a few hours, the brisket will have taken on about as much smoke as it can/should. So if it makes sense ...


3

I am not aware of any rigorous tests done on a sequence like you propose. In the absence of data, I simply assume holding any open cooked product more than a week in the refrigerator is risky, smoke notwithstanding. You can significantly boost your safety by soaking your brisket for at least 24 hours in an acidic salt bath -- perhaps with some brown ...


3

Refreeze it. You know how long it will take to thaw now, so put it back in the freezer if you are concerned. There's all sorts of myths saying re-freezing is bad but there's no risk. It may impact the texture a bit, but it's better than it spoiling.


3

I would think that it wouldn't be ideal ... but if you work quickly it shouldn't cause too much problem. (basically, you want to work quickly enough that the meat doesn't cool down significantly). I'd probably prep the replacement bag before I even took the meat out of the water, and have a towel and scissors ready (pull the bag out, dry the outside, cut ...


2

All of your postulations are valid. A couple more below. These would my main concerns: A normal grill has a tendency to be wilder in control and cooking to the centre properly might become unpredictable. Though I have seen full grill recipes with the Big Green Egg. This you can mitigate using an insertion probe thermometer. Purpose of the grill is ...


2

Pretty much no, they are totally non-alike. The beauty of brisket is that it is full of connective tissue and other odd stuff that translates to succulence when cooked low and slow. Round is pretty much the opposite, it has very little in the way of interest.


2

I believe 3-5 days is the basic guidance for keeping raw, defrosted whole cuts of meat in the refrigerator (See FoodSafety.gov). Packaging has nothing to do with this. Temperature is critical (below 40F...and colder is always better). I would say you are fine.


2

Smoking a brisket until it hits around 160F and then finishing it in the oven is a common way to cook brisket. Meat doesn't benefit much from further smoking after it hits 160F or so, and the oven is much less finicky than a grill or meat smoker. For reference, here is a good description of smoking brisket in a charcoal smoker and then finishing in the oven. ...


2

Generally, yes, you can leave a brisket in a marinade for 48 hours or even longer. The exception would be a marinade that is very highly acidic, but not that's not likely to be a problem with a commercial marinade.


2

I have to disagree, sous vide first 129F 72 hours. It will be cooked and edible. Next cool down the brisket with cool water in the sous vide tank, remove wrapper, dry off and then prep as you would a raw brisket. Season with preferred rub and then place on the smoker. The bonus here is you do not have to get it to 200 as it is already cooked so you only ...


2

According to ChefSteps, tough cuts, like brisket, is where sous vide really shines. If a company that specializes in sous vide is advocating for the use of it on brisket, I would trust that it is perfectly fine. You can check out there website for recipes and additional information: ChefSteps


2

With the important exception of salt, there’s little to no difference between adding things to the bag pre-cook, mid-cook, or post-cook. Go ahead and do it, but there’s no reason to worry about it. All you are doing is adding steps and potentially cooling down your food (which is a risk). It just doesn’t make a difference. The molecules are too big to ...


1

Short answer as already stated...definitely smoke first....and I agree on avoiding the liquid smoke as much as possible... But I am curious. I assume you are only cooking a flat, and not a full brisket, unless you are planning to do this in a tub. And I also assume you are going more for a slow cooker style brisket, rather than a true BBQ brisket. If not ...


1

Don't keep it. Set your alarm clock and start smoking in time to finish for dinner time. Once you get the firebox going you can go back to bed and set an alarm for 2 hours later. Unless you have done this a few times then keeping the firebox going properly is not an automatic. You can finish most brisket in 6-8 hours. The brisket should already be double ...


1

This is indeed possible and not really hard to do. Just look up some tutorial videos on youtube to see where to cut. Be careful with the reduced cooking time, though. Brisket needs it's time to denaturate/melt the fat and collagens. Maybe pre-cook it sous-vide for a few hours if you have limited time on the smoker.


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