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It is possible that you didn't poke big enough holes, or that the heat from the burner was not enough to cause the pellets to smoulder. You need to place the packet on the burner directly (actually on the rack above the burner, removing the diffuser), not on top of the diffuser (see Step 2 in these Step-by-step instructions). One way to test would be to fire ...


2

The process for cooking slices of brisket is the same for a whole piece, the time involved is needed to break down the tough collagen. Slices the size of yours will take a bit less time to cook than a whole piece as they will heat up faster, but it's not that much of a difference. Your proposed method should do fine.


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Reheating a brisket will generally dry it out a bit more. It will depend on the quality of the brisket whether this will lead it to become too dry. Moisture in cooked briskets is actually mostly fat. Some BBQ joints will call their point slices "moist" while others call them "fatty", which is probably most accurate. What you will probably ...


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The low, constant temperature balanced the hydrolysis of collagen into gelatin with keeping the other meat proteins from over coagulating. Based on a cursory search on the internet, hydrolysis of collagen into gelatin begins at roughly 140°F, although it really gets going at 160°-180°F. Had the cook left the brisket in for longer, it probably would have ...


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Yes, you can cook it a second time and it may help. When you cook meat two things will happen (well, more than two...). One is that it will lose moisture. The longer you cook it the more moisture (i.e. water) you will lose, and there's no getting it back. The second thing that happens is that the connective tissues break down to collagen, which is what ...


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