12

Cook it less, if you can. The more you cook it, the more you get that smell. Perhaps you are just more sensitive to it than most; I don't generally notice it until it's overcooked by my standards. Along with this, cook it as fast as you can. The flavor you don't like is produced by enzymes converting precursor molecules into those with the flavor. From On ...


10

I'm sorry that you're having problems with my book. I think the problem is that you're adding water to the pouch. In the recipe, step 4 asks you to: Vacuum-seal the broccoli, butter, and a pinch of salt and pepper in a large pouch so that the florets are in a single layer. This will crush the tops a bit, but it will be much easier to seal. Sorry again....


9

Raw broccoli is crunchy, and cooking softens it. Usually it's cooked until somewhat softer but still with a bit of crunchiness or at least firmness. Most likely the very soft broccoli you describe is just more cooked, probably overcooked by a lot of people's standards. You can't easily tell that much about the quality of the broccoli at that point; the ...


7

Yes, you absolutely can. I do it all the time, in both quiche and omelets. It does need to be cooked which is most easily done in the microwave. Prep by removing much of the large stem, diving into little 'tree' segments, and placing in a microwave-safe dish or bowl. Add just a bit of water, not much, just about a tablespoon, to create steam. Cover with ...


6

As many people here have noted, these "sell by" and "best by" dates are not very consistent, accurate or well defined. If your broccoli looks fine and smells fine, chances are it's fine. Signs of spoilage to look for are: sliminess on the surface, mushy areas in the broccoli flesh, small dark areas dotting the "canopy" or the tops of the florets, or furry ...


6

Luckily you caught it before it finished the whole crown :) What you've got there is an earwig (probably one of the most creepy names possible for such a thing) and they're not known to be contaminants (they don't carry or transmit diseases to humans). Hard to tell from the picture, but that one seems to either have just begun (or finished) a molting ...


6

Mashing/pureeing the broccoli is probably the best bet here, as folks guessed in comments. That second picture looks like it has really tiny pieces of broccoli, small enough that you end up with it coating the rice. This seems to be confirmed by recipes online that look relatively similar. For example this recipe says: Coloque os talos e as folhas até eles ...


6

further to SAJ14SAJ's answer, what happens is the Magnesium atom in the bright green Chlorophyll is lost in acidic conditions and you end up with Pheophytin which is Olive Green. There are other reactions at play mediated by the enzyme Chlorophyllase which can be active even in frozen storage. The main reason for blanching (hot water part) is to stop this ...


6

Per the transcript of Alton Brown's Good Eat's episode If It Ain't Broccoli, Don't Fix It: Inside broccoli, nice, bright green chlorophylls are kept separate from acidic elements by cell walls. But if you overcook the broccoli, the cell walls can collapse, and the acids can attack, turning our nice, bright green chlorophylls into a sad, dingy gray. ...


5

Like most vegetables, broccoli starts off very firm and crunchy and softens as you cook it. Boiling, stewing and steaming tend to decrease crunchiness linearly, and more direct heats like stir-frying tend to cook the outside more. The only real thing we can suggest here is that these two places are cooking the broccoli in different ways or for different ...


4

I've never had a problem, but I also don't do a 100% steam cooking method ... you may want to try it and see if it sets off your nose, as we're all sensitive to smells to a different degree: Heat a skillet with a little bit of oil in it. (you can use non-stick, but you still want a little bit of oil) Cut up the flourets, but set them aside. Slice up the ...


4

This does not happen if you boil it for 30-60 seconds, drain, then ice water shock the broccoli instead of steaming. In steaming, the usual way to prevent this is to eat it quickly and to steam for a very short time. However, steaming to the same point of moderate tenderness takes at least 6 minutes at high pressure, and the cooking doesn't stop after you ...


4

I cannot comment directly on the broccoli, but I want to point out that this part How big a risk am I taking by just blending frozen broccoli into my smoothies without cooking at all? How likely is it that I get sick and what might be the symptoms? is impossible to answer. This is not how food safety works. Creating a prediction for such a risk is as ...


4

The problem is two fold. First is that thawing and unthawing make more and more water to penetrate to "object" breaking the cells. IMO such food (meat or veggies) become woody in texture and making it less tasty (sometimes I would even say I taste the freezer ice not the food). Second is more serious. Bacteria. There are some bacteria, especially in your ...


3

That won't make it non-safe as long as it gets hot all the way through. MICROWAVE (PREFERRED METHOD) Place bag of sauce in a bowl with warm water to thaw. Open bags of chicken and broccoli and empty into a microwave safe container. Microwave on HIGH, uncovered for 3 minutes. Open bag of sauce. Stir in sauce and heat for 3 additional minutes or until hot*. ...


3

Neither broccoli nor corn is going to be all that picky regarding oven temperature, you'll be fine just splitting the difference. Since corn is the less picky of the two items, I'd go 400F. Expect the broccoli to take slightly longer than the recipe, and the corn to take less time. But don't make yourself nuts about it. Neither corn slightly more done than ...


3

We love all things broccoli ; soup included. I always add a pinch of baking soda, and that's the end of the odour. Good luck.


2

I have always had good results with adding a stalk of celery when steaming broccoli, and then discarding it after cooking. Don't know why it works, but my mom had done this for years after reading it in some cookbook, and it does seem to change the odor that permeates the kitchen.


2

I have to confess, I tend to cut them into chunks and eat them raw, while cooking the rest of the dinner. If you cut them into strips, I'm sure they'd make a good crunchy alternative to carrot/celery etc for dips. Or, leave the broc whole, and stand it up in a narrow pan with enough water to cover most of the stem, and the lid on. The florets steam, the ...


2

It is safe to eat, but it would be fibrous and a bit tough - not to mention that the flavor might be a bit subdued. I would personally cut my loses and toss it in the bin.


2

From my experience, I used to cook green rice, however I don't use broccoli in this coloring method. I use spinach instead. I boil the spinach, then blend them all with their water until being very smooth. then I cook the rice using this water. I guess u can try this method, then add the broccoli as whole pieces in it. Unfortunately, I have no pics to ...


1

It should be safe as long as the chicken is cooked, but they discourage it because the sauce cooks at a different rate from the entree. Dark, thick sauces like oyser sauce burn extremely easily in microwaves.


1

Cooking the sauce in the microwave is not going to make it unsafe to eat. It may make it a little thicker or thinner but not unsafe.


1

I'd go even further - I never cook the broccoli before I use it in a quiche. It is all about the size of broccoli you use: large chunk = long cooking time, small chunks = short cooking time. For a finely chopped broccoli I would go for 30-40 min in 180C. So all you have to do is finely chop the broccoli before you use it in a quiche. You can do it either ...


1

Could you cool the broccoli, drain, and then freeze it a bit until solid enough to avoid the liquid problem, then vacuum seal it as usual?


1

Cooked food becomes potentially hazardous when it cools and also when it is re-heated from cold. Why one brand would have a food safety warning and another would not, I cannot say. Sometimes manufacturers treat food in other ways (like irradiation) to control possible contamination issues. The temperature at which the broccoli would have been factory-...


1

I think almost everything that has been cooked previously carries the warning of reheat to 73-76c or 167f. Not just broccoli, it is just the accepted reheat temperature. However if your not heating it at all and it'll stay below 7c you should be perfectly safe :-) Who probes vegetables anyway? 😉


1

According to Cargo Handbook (emphasis added): Broccoli is not sensitive to chilling temperatures and should be stored as cold as possible without freezing. When freezing injured, thawed buds will be very dark and translucent, and can later turn brown or may serve as sites for development of bacterial decay. Note that they are describing how to store and ...


1

Broccoli rabe are hard to grow without turning bitter, and this is why in general they are not that popular Like most vegetables you can reduce bitterness by soaking or cooking in milk, or by adding a small amount of lime (Calcium hydroxide) to the blanching/cooking water See What counters astringency?


1

Rather than using the sealer, use a ziplock bag: Before closing it completely, submerge all but the opened part in water. This will force the air out. Seal the last portion while submerged.


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