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39

I notice that your recipe doesn't include any salt. That's important, because salt decreases the sensation of bitterness. Chicken contains a certain amount of salt, and I suspect that's making the difference. (The "umami" -- brothy -- taste of chicken may also decrease the sensation of bitterness, though as I understand it there's still some disagreement ...


20

There's a great deal of variation in the quality of the pre-made stocks you get from different sources, so there's no clear-cut answer. Here's the types you might find: Stock cubes: these are dehydrated stock, or sometimes just chemicals meant to taste like it. It's the lowest quality option. There's a lot of variation here, I've found some brands (knorr ...


17

My advice: ditch the soaking liquid. Here's what I just tried. I divided my dried mushrooms up into 10 bowls: 5 with dried chanterelles and 5 with dried porcini. I added equal amounts of water to each at the following temperatures 10°C (directly from the tap), 40°C, 60°C, 80°C and 100°C (or as close as I could get). After soaking for 15 minutes I sampled ...


15

Yes, you can, if you use a pressure cooker. You can easily create stocks and bone broth in less than an hour. I prefer this method. I make all my stocks in a pressure cooker. I save a lot of time, and the flavor extraction is excellent. I ramp up the alliums, because their flavor tends to get muted in the pressure cooker. Otherwise prepare as if you were ...


14

Eric Ripert's approach is essentially that if the cooking liquid tastes good, it will help impart flavor on whatever you cook in that liquid. By adding ham & aromatics, the goal is that the octopus will take on some of that flavor. By converse, the same theory would say that if you cook in a simpler, bland water, your octopus will flavor the water, and ...


11

Good home-made stock is easy and cheap to make. All you need is an old stock pot (no lid needed, you want the water to evaporate), and a bunch of pork bones and connective tissue. The bones will add the pork flavor, while the connective tissue will break down into gelatin. The best way to get the pot is a thrift store (charity shop to UK types), and the ...


11

Edible? Absolutely yes. Flavorful? ....you should taste it and tell us. Seriously, don't serve a meal to anyone, yourself included, until you've tasted it and it tastes at least decent. (Not trying to be snarky here, that's literally the best cooking tip I was ever given) Nutritious? Probably somewhat--that chicken muscle is primarily protein after all....


10

Is it safe? That depends on a lot of factors. Generally, no. It isn't. A blog post from the Healthy Home Economist has the opinion of a firefighter: One gal mentioned that her husband was a firefighter and that leaving a stockpot simmering overnight or while they were out of the house was completely out of the question. Source. The NFPA says the ...


10

Beef bones can be used multiple times, but less flavor and gelatin will be extracted from each additional use. Harold McGee's "On Food and Cooking" describes this. Because a standard kitchen extraction of eight hours releases only about 20% of the gelatin in beef bones, the bones may be extracted for a second time, for a total of up to 24 hours. The ...


10

Both the broccoli stem and the lemon are likely culprits - they probably accentuate each other in a bad way. The lemon (pith) will definitely add a bitter taste on its own - as Spagirl mentioned, the zest and the juice are the non-bitter parts that you would add if you wanted lemon flavor without the bitterness. The broccoli stems are surely not helping ...


9

Ideally it is simmered, but the proof is in the taste really as there's no safety issue. If it tastes good then use it, if it doesn't chuck it.


9

All excellent information, but can I answer bluntly: none of them come even CLOSE to the real thing. Once you use fresh stock, you will never, ever go back. Really. Making stock is easy, cheap, and as said above, unattended time. Stock forms the base of the kitchen, once you have it, you will notice the taste of everything you make improve so much. Get some ...


9

I make veg stock overnight in a slow cooker on high with similar ingredients to you: onion, garlic, carrot, bay, peppercorns. But: celery instead of celeriac (I grow celery and often have some old tough stems and leaves which are perfect for stock), rarely parsnip or leek, and often some other herbs or veg I've got to hand. I don't add salt, and my ...


8

Perhaps you could consider straining it twice? Use your strainer the first time to get out the larger particles and then do a second time with the cheesecloth so that it doesn't get clogged as easily. I imagine this wouldn't be any faster, but you'd have to fight with the clogged cheesecloth less.


8

Usually it's best to cook dried noodles in boiling water, and drain and rinse them in cold water when they are done. This does a couple of things: helps ensure that the noodle is equally cooked all the way through (instead of getting overcooked on the outside by the time the centre is cooked). by using separate water, you don't fill your broth with starch, ...


7

We (humans) can be pretty bad at estimating volume by eye, especially if you're putting a bunch of cubes in one bowl - they don't pack efficiently (there's a lot of air in there). You might not actually be losing that much volume. For example, I just dumped out an ice cube tray full of cubes, and they looked like a bit over 2 cups, but once melted (and I ...


7

Allow me to describe what happened. (TLDR; complete success) I started out with The regular lobster soup starter pack. About 1.5 liters of water, half a bottle of white wine. This isn't clear at all. Eggwhites. Really slow boil. Siphon to test. I'm ok with this. The end result was fantastic What really surprised me was that I started with well ...


7

Not difficult at all if you truly want to get every possible last drop. Choose a large clean tea towel for this purpose only. After you've drained most of the liquids out, line your colander with the tea towel and pour the last bit with meat and vegetables in. I found using clothespins to the towel in place is best. Gather the corners up and you can either ...


7

You don't mention covering your pot, so I'm assuming you left it uncovered for the duration. If that's the case, you boiled all your liquid off. Next time you can try using a lid, that should slow the evaporation of water from your pot and leave you with some stock still in the pot. Even if the pot was covered, though, "a couple of hours" is a pretty long ...


7

That recipe relies on starch exuded by the pasta to thicken the broth enough to emulsify the cheese. If your brand of pasta throws off less starch, the broth won't be thick enough to keep the cheese from globbing up. I suggest adding some corn starch slurry just before the cheese. Remove a quarter cup or so of the broth, allowing it to cool slightly; add ...


6

Formulas for stock are somewhat variable, but a common case is to use 3 kg of bones (and half a kg of mirepoix, which is a vegetable mix used for taste) with 4-5 l water, which after cooking down yields 3 l of stock, or just a little bit more than that. I couldn't find an especially good figure for the bone:meat ratio of chickens, but many Internet sites ...


6

A piece of muslin/cotton/fine-tissue-of-your-choice will do the job nicely. You can easily find it in kitchen stores or online.


6

Some recipes might be pickier, but Mexican rice is almost certainly the kind of thing where the broth is just there to add a bit of background flavor, and it doesn't have to be specifically chicken. So you can be pretty flexible. Your primary options are: Use a different kind of pre-made broth. They'll all work for something like that, just provide slightly ...


6

The obvious downside is safety: each time you go through a heating and cooling cycle, your food will spend time in the danger zone. It's hard to guess exactly how long, but if it's a large volume and it takes an hour to cool to 40F and 15 minutes to heat back up to 140F, and you use the conservative end of the safe time range (2 hours) you might have a ...


6

It is not necessary in the sense that if you like the finished product then why do the extra work? That said, the scum that you get from boiling bones/meat isn't really the good stuff. The good stuff is soluble flavor compounds that wind up incorporated into the (liquid) broth. Recipes from test kitchen folks (Cook Illustrated and Serious Eats) usually call ...


6

Add more broth. Use either water, balanced with spices, or add from a good brand. Edit: You could always make more broth than you need and freeze the rest.


5

I don't think you can re-use the bones and expect to get a good product, no. But I wouldn't use a whole chicken to make stock in the first place. Use necks, backs, and wings instead -- much cheaper! You can roast the pieces first if you'd like, or not. You'll get different results, both good.


5

You definitely can't just leave it on the stove; that'd mean far longer than 2 hours in the danger zone. (See for example How do I know if food left at room temperature is still safe to eat?) If cooking until it's done is out of the question, you need to try to chill it. Putting the whole pot in the fridge might not be the best approach, though; it could ...


5

Personally I side with your family here, I have a gas stove and the idea of leaving something on all night is not one I'm comfortable with. However, leaving the pot out overnight is not a good idea from a food safety perspective or a results perspective. You won't get a tasty result even if it is safe to eat. A good option would be a low power electrical ...


5

Brief answer: no, you shouldn't be worried. Slightly longer answer: you only should be worried if your stock/broth displays characteristics of unskimmed stock (i.e., cloudiness, particles, or odd color) and that bothers you in your particular application for the stock/broth. Long answer: There are lots of things that can reduce the amount of apparent foam,...


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