10

Brown sugar is just white granulated sugar with molasses added. Dark brown sugar just has more molasses than light brown sugar. Coffee shops often have turbinado sugar, a common brand is Sugar in the Raw. Turbinado sugar is brown because it is less refined than white sugar. The turbinado sugar is less "wet" than brown sugar, so it will dissolve somewhat ...


6

In the past I have had a similar issue with making a butterscotch drink recipe. What I have found is that adding a bit of water to the melted butter (1-2 tsp/1/2 c, 5-10mL/120mL) helps dissolve the brown sugar and prevents graininess and seizing. Sugar is not readily soluble in fat, so it needs water in order to dissolve. I suspect one of three things ...


6

The moisture from the bread is absorbed by the brown sugar. After a while, the bread will be like a withered old mummified piece of white toast. Get rid of it, and put a new piece of bread in there.


5

Muscovado sugar is a partially refined sugar. Hence, it has a lot of what is essentially molasses contained in it. The molasses can migrate, leaving whiter areas; also scraping with a spoon, e.g., can leave whiter areas. To reconsitute, place in a jar with a piece of bread or covered with a damp cloth (what I do). Within a few hours, it should be nice ...


4

I recently had a similar problem, and I would guess that your solution will be similar as well. As in my case your recipe fails to be specific regarding too what temperature to elevate your mixture. To solve this you will need a candy thermometer. (In the US these are available at most stores that carry kitchen implements (Wal-xxx, Tarxx, etc.) The peek ...


4

First, be aware that substituting brown for white sugar will result in a different product. Brown sugar has molasses flavors, and absorbs water differently from white sugar, so both the taste and texture of the final baked goods will be different and no amount of adjusting quantities will change this. With that in mind, 1 cup of packed brown sugar, ...


3

Brown sugar is equivalent to sugar plus molasses. If you mix brown sugar and (white) sugar, you'll get slightly brown sugar. Any benefits you were expecting from the (white) sugar, you'll still get. Any benefits you were expecting from the molasses, you'll get less of.


3

Wet a dishtowel.Make sure that it is really wet almost dripping. Microwave it for 2min. Be carefull it is really hot and steaming. cover top of bowl( Do not touch brown sugar)Microwave another 30 sec. Let set for 1 to 2 min. take out. Break up with for and hands.


3

For a short answer, I recommend using brown sugar in your case. Brown sugar has more of it's own flavour, while white sugar is very plain, so when you ask "which one give more taste", you probably want brown. Brown sugar tastes this way because it contains molasses (a juice from the sugarcane). An alternative to brown cane sugar is "raw sugar" (also known ...


3

I always store brown sugar in an airtight, ziplock bag. That works pretty well for preventing it from getting hard. It does not need to be refrigerated. However, if your brown sugar is already hard, there are a few techniques that people often recommend for resoftening it. These include: storing it in a closed container for a short period of time with ...


3

You will never be able to get sweetness into them in the same way as if you had added sugar to begin with, but you do have other options. As Fabby said, you can add sweet things to them now which will result in a sweet topping (or sandwitch!). Depending on the type of cookie (it would work better with soft cookies) you could try crumbling them up and ...


3

There are tons of things you can add to them after the fact: Icing Jam Crème au beurre with lots of sugar Whipped cream with 2 packs of vanilla sugar instead of one Grated chocolate Honey ... With some of the above (like jam, chocolate and honey), you can put them into the oven again at a low temperature (50°C / 120°F) and get a unique cookie!


3

Yes! Brown sugar is nothing more than white granular sugar plus molasses. That's it! 1 Tbsp molasses per cup of granular sugar = light brown sugar and 2 Tbsp molasses for dark brown sugar. There is no need to waste your money buying either, or worse, both. Omitting the molasses and just using plain white sugar in a recipe will however change the taste ...


3

I’ve had this problem several times with melting brown sugar and butter together and boiling it. The key is to start on a lower temperature, stirring the brown sugar and butter as it melts. Allow the mixture to slowly get to a boil and then leave it-allow it to boil on its own evaporating some of the liquid. Never do this on high temperature-it wrecks it ...


2

Since you haven't provided any additional information, I'm just going to provide our best guess here, what SAJ14SAJ and I were both thinking. If you want to put something in a croissant, whether it's a piece of chocolate or any other filling, the normal way is to put a strip of it along the side of the triangle which becomes the inside of the croissant. ...


2

I know its not quick, but I store a slice of bread with my brown sugar. Softens up hard sugar and never let's it get hard if a new bag.


2

I have had similar issue with a brown sugar / butter candy that I've been making since I was a kid. I'm coming to the conclusion that there is a difference in brands of brown sugar and the one I've used for years works and the one that is most commonly available where I now live makes up grainy. Maybe I'll try adding some water to see if that eliminates ...


2

A standard substitute for brown sugar is to take 1 Cup = 200 g of white granulated sugar, and mix-in 1 tablespoon of molasses/treacle. There's a lot of flavor in that tablespoon. My own recommendation would be to either supplement your full 200 g of brown sugar with a tablespoon of treacle or consider using 200 g of granulated sugar and mix-in 2 ...


1

Blackstrap molasses isn't exactly just light molasses with less sugar. It's been cooked for longer during the refining process, leading to more Maillard browning. But that's not a major effect. If you add some sugar and a bit of water to blackstrap molasses, you'll basically have light(er) molasses.


1

Depends how acid it was ("contains vinegar" is not a pH) and what temperature it was "held" at, as well as jar size. As a rule, canning is best done by following tested recipes and procedures which have been checked to work for the particular food type and jar size - i.e. many things are not considered safe if packed in quarts due to the larger size of the ...


1

You could always recycle those food grade desiccants and put them in your brown sugar container. In Japan, they use bincho charcoal in anything that needs to have a certain level of moisture. Apparently the bincho charcoal is able to regulate moisture content, release stored moisture when too dry, and absorb it when it's too wet.


1

Cookie mixes (and similar mixes) usually call for the dry and wet ingredients to be mixed separately, which is mostly to prevent over-mixing and to properly control the amount of time that the baking powder/soda (or whatever chemical leavener is in there) is allowed to start its reaction before going into the oven. Of course you can still mix the sugar in ...


1

Granulated to caster ie: fine sugar is the most recommended. I use caster sugar to get a smooth transition in the pastry. Then chill at least 20 minutes before baking to relax the gluten so it is nice and flaky.


1

I'm not sure but I think brown suger can also be used to make a Herman. The Herman dough consists of Lactobacillales and yeast. Both need sugar to live. White refined sugar mostly consists of saccharose (99,96 % saccharose, 0,04 % inverted sugar syrup).1 Brown sugar is nothing else than white sugar mixed with molasses. 2 Therefore I assume that you can use ...


1

My go-to brownie recipe is very similar to your butterscotch bars, just melt butter + sugar in the microwave until just melted. The texture will be a little grainy (or if you want to use the stovetop, use a double boiler or baine Marie). Wait till warm and when you add the egg, the mixture will become smooth. By the time when the flour is added everything ...


1

Who says you need to buy a cute terra cotta teddy bear? I left a small terra cotta planter outside during winter and rescued 3 broken pieces that weren't sharp. I washed them off, dried them, re-wet them with hot water and stuck them on top of the brown sugar. I closed up the bag and within 15 minutes, the top of the sugar was soft ~ 1 cup worth. I repeated ...


1

I just had the problem 2 batches in a row. The 3rd time, I made sure that the margarine was at room temp (not directly from the fridge). I then started heating at a low temp instead of medium so that it heated more slowly. This batch worked perfectly


1

Just to add in the Australian terms. Top - white sugar, raw sugar. Bottom - light brown sugar, dark brown sugar


1

Place the brown sugar, in an extra large airtight container. Boil water, and put into a cup (I usually use a couple of ounces). Put the cup into the container, making sure that the cup and water does not touch the brown sugar, close container and leave for 30 minutes or until soft. Remove cup carefully, making sure not to spill water. My smart sister ...


1

I found the fastest and easiest way to accomplish softening brown sugar was to place the brown sugar on to a paper plate, then place an additional paper plate over the top of the brown sugar. I then used the top paper plate to smash down the brown sugar. Then I took my hammer to it and smashed it, it was nice and fine and soft after wards. Then you just ...


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