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23

This is not a burnt patch, cast iron doesn't burn. It is almost certainly a rust patch. Since the surface comes into direct contact with food, you cannot use the rust removers sold in home improvement stores. You need to remove it with lye - you can try a mechanical stripping too, but that is unlikely to get all tiny specks of rust, unless you get serious ...


18

Butter is not only fine, but extremely common in baked goods. I think the piece you're missing here is that the oven temperature is not the same as the temperature of the baked goods. The internal temperature of most baked goods never even goes above boiling, unsurprising since there's at least a bit of moisture in there. While the exterior does get hotter, ...


16

Since raisins are a type of dried fruit, they don't have a lot of moisture left in them. Heat from baking with just make them drier, eventually resulting in that chewy, not particularly pleasant lump. The internal raisins are more protected from the heat, so they stay the same consistency. One solution may be to soak the raisins in water, fruit juice, or ...


13

Your pan is getting too hot. Cast iron has a lot of" thermal mass", which means that it takes a good bit of energy (and time) to heat up, then it holds on to that heat and takes time to cool down. Most likely, your pan is still heating up when you cook your first pancake. It's at the right temperature, but still on the upswing and getting hotter. ...


12

Yes, if you were burning food that provided you exactly the caloric intake you need to maintain your weight, and if you ate only that and didn't replace the lost calories by adding additional food. To carry it to extremes, you could oxidize your food to an inorganic ash. Metabolic (food) calories are ultimately identical to the energy found in any non-food ...


11

There is nothing you can add or do to your sauce to remove or mask the burnt taste. Really. Don't even try. Throw it out and start over, being careful not to burn it this time. For some foods, there are various tricks you can try for removing the burnt taste, but they all start with removing the burnt bits. With a sauce where you've already thoroughly ...


10

I'm not sure your exact recipe or method, but you cannot get rid of the burnt taste or smell and you will need to start over with fresh ingredients. You don't need or want to boil the milk at any part of the process, just to heat the milk enough to activate the thickener. In the case of a classic flour roux thickened sauce you start by cooking the roux for ...


9

Bake 1 hour It seems that you are baking by the clock. This doesn't usually produce good results, you should bake until it is done. The time suggested in the recipe is a rough guideline, not the time when you should take it out of the oven. Start testing for doneness when it starts looking good, and take it out when it tests ready. It doesn't matter how ...


8

A crockpot's keep warm setting is not designed to keep food safe and fresh for days, it's really only good for an hour or two at most. What's happening in your case is that the water is evaporating from your food and then drying out inside the pot. Adding water periodically is not an answer as the temperature of the food is not high enough to prevent ...


7

I'm going to try to take a crack at this answer, from my perspective as a materials scientist, which is kind of a combination of solid state physics and solid state chemistry. How popcorn pops is from superheating the water in the kernels until there's enough pressure to break through the outer hull. Then, the starch inside the kernel is able to rapidly ...


7

I think most of your confusion comes from the paradigm of water. Water (under kitchen conditions) will not get any hotter than its boiling point. Oil has no such limitation. You microwave will heat oil well past water's boiling point and all the way up past the smoke point to the flash point of the oil. At the flash point, the oil will actually catch ...


7

Some options: Prepare the biryani in an oven (used when making biryani with uncooked meat) in a really thick, covered oven pan, with no foiling at 200 degrees Celsius for around 30 mins. It won't stick to the bottom or get burnt. Keep a cast iron tawa underneath the pot the rice is in. Rice won't stick. Add some ghee at the bottom of the rice before ...


7

What kind of oil you're using would be helpful but, really, the answer is, whatever temperature it is you set it at, it's too hot. Turn the temperature down. The temperature gauges shouldn't necessarily be trusted to give you a perfect temperature reading. You can use an infrared thermometer to test it but your result tells everything, really. If your gas ...


7

Then you aren't using "low to medium heat". The heat is defined by how quickly your food cooks, not by the setting on the stove. Lower your heat until the food fries at a reasonable rate. As for the oil, if in doubt, err on the side of adding a bit more than you think you'll need.


6

The charring is crucial to both the flavor and the texture. The charred part itself brings a bitter note to the flavor. If you don't like it, you can cut it out, but many people would miss it. It's also crunchy, which provides a pleasant contrast to the chewy parts of the bread. It's also incidental to the way it's cooked. In order to get the flavorful ...


6

The reason your split peas are hard is that you added salt or stock to the water before they finished cooking. From your initial post, you say you've added something called "Spike seasoning". I'm guessing that's the culprit. It's probably got salt in it. You have to cook split peas in just water for at least an hour, then stir to break them down and add ...


6

It is unlikely that the burned residue from eggs warrants either tossing the pan or the stove. In fact, depending on what the pan is made of, you could likely clean it and continue to use it and the likely worse thing that would happen would be the next thing you cook in the pan might have a burned flavor. If stoves had to be thrown away every time ...


5

It's possible your oven thermometer is not calibrated. It's easy and cheap to buy a replacement thermometer instead of replacing the one internal to your oven. The Rubbermaid Commercial Stainless Steel Oven Monitoring Thermometer can be purchased on Amazon for $6-7. I spoke with a friend recently who had a similar problem when they moved to an older home ...


5

I usually set the temperature to 150-200oC Forget the temperature setting of your induction stove. If it has any sensor at all (some don't), it is a sensor below the plate, far away from your pan and food. It has nothing to do with the real tempearature in your pan, and is a useless gimmick. Use the normal strength setting, and start with the lowest. If ...


5

You can either add a lot of vinegar (to get above the problem area) -- or you can try to displace the vinegar so you don't need as much. Find a smaller pot and fill it with water and set it in the center of the pot to clean, and then pour vinegar between the two pots (or pot & item). Although I said 'fill it with water', you only really need a little ...


5

Starting with more water than you think you need, keeping the lid on for a bit and then stirring a lot while it reduces to the desired consistency should be all you need to do. Don't go far from it once it starts to thicken because it will need too much stirring. You can cook split peas in a slow cooker, but I haven't found the softening very reliable. A ...


5

After a discussion in chat with @FuzzyChef I decided that I was trying too hard to keep the dough dry. I wasn't using all of the milk (just a bit left over) and struggled a bit to get all the flour incorporated into the dough. Using all the milk made the dough more sticky, so it required more careful handling, but the result came out just fine. (I also ...


5

I think most people don't realize a microwave oven is just a radio transmitter. The cavity you put your food into is part of a tuned area for this transmitter. Instead of feeding the output of this transmitter into an antenna, the power is contained within the cavity and, thus, warming the food. Note: extremely simplified statements. Mistuned transmitters ...


5

With the exception of the water and salt, any of those ingredients will burn if you heat them hot enough. If you're seeing it more with a particular brand, though, and if it's happening at temperatures below 200 degrees Celsius, it's probably the egg. Mass-produced commercial mayonnaise like Kraft has relatively little egg, while 'boutique' mayo (or homemade ...


5

It sounds like either your heat is too high, or there is not enough liquid in your stew. If you can't reduce the flame, consider a heat diffuser.


5

Give the pan longer to heat initially, but use a lower flame. It sounds like the temperature is still evening out on the first one & has settled subsequently. Alternatively, do the first as you normally do, but drop the temperature before the second goes in. 'Medium' is not really an accurate description, & every stove & every pan is different.


4

You've got a few options: slightly cooler can make a big difference (basically buying you time to keep things moving). or hotter can brown the meat faster if it's going to be cooked through in a sauce. (more) oil should stop the spices sticking to the pan; that's when they burn if they're big chunks of meat you can turn them individually rather than ...


4

If it's just scorched on the bottom of the pan, and you haven't mixed the burnt material into the rest of the gravy, you can try just pouring the good gravy into another pan. If you've tried to stir it and scrape the burnt stuff off the bottom, there's not much you can do. The human palette can detect very small quantities of burnt flavours, so you won't be ...


4

From the way that picture looks, this is a sandwich-bottom pan with some thin kind of coating on the bottom. That coating seems to have come off. In that case, there is nothing you can do to make it look the way it did before. If I were you, I would just continue to use the pan as-is. No need to throw it away, as it will still work, and no need to try to ...


4

The discoloration is from overheating the pan, not from stains. The actual metal has changed color through accidental tempering, so you won't be able to clean it off other than by grinding the metal down or re-tempering it (neither of which is a good idea). The color won't significantly affect the performance of the pan. Just ignore it.


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