96

In Germany we have an old (joking) saying that roughly translates to "head off, tail off - bunny", so your question is legitimate. But first thing's first: There is no health risk1 involved if you ate the latest shipment of "meowling rabbit". (To cat lovers everywhere: This is no endorsement, I have a much loved and pampered cat, too!) The most obvious ...


43

In the textbook Text-book of meat hygiene: with special consideration to ante-mortem and post-mortem inspection of food-producing animals (Edelmann & Eichorn, 1908), pages 64-65 concern determining the difference between a cat and rabbit: The following differences in the skeleton are especially to be mentioned: The lateral processes of the lumbar ...


35

The simplest way to tell the difference is to look at the ribs. Cats have one pair of floating ribs, but rabbits have three pairs. The floating ribs are the ones at the bottom (i.e. towards the tail), that are not attached to anything at their outer end. All the other ribs are either attached directly to the breastbone, or to the cartilage that extends from ...


19

This a a great video that explains every step. She cuts the head off by slicing above the eyes, so removing the beak is a part of cleaning the tentacles. These are your first cuts. Cut the head off above the eyes, and slit the head open. Rinse out the guts, there will be some connective tissue that needs to be cut away or broken to get to all of the yucky ...


15

The simplest way to see the difference is to compare the cut diagrams: British French Images courtesy of Wikipedia - Cut of Beef The main difference is in how certain areas are sub-divided. We can see that faux-filet is part of the British sirloin, and entrecote is partly forerib and partly sirloin.


9

The easy way is to look at skull, paws, and tail - but these are normally removed! Cat have short paws, long tails, and a sleeker skull Hares have very long rear legs, easy to spot Rabbit have curved lower leg bones (tibia and radius?), shaped like this () Cats generally have quite straight lower leg bones, shaped like this V. The are nearly touching ...


9

The main differences I see in the skeletons of the two animals is that the cat's humerus (large single bone in the front legs) and its radius/ulna (smaller dual bones in the front legs) seem to be very close in length, or the single bone is slightly longer. The same goes for the hind legs, where the femur (single bone) and the tibia/fibula (dual bones) are ...


7

It is used. It's almost hard to avoid in Florence: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lampredotto If the question is, why is this stomach used less frequently than other stomachs, I have no idea.


6

Chicken gizzards have a tough membrane on the inside (the only part that gets in contact with the bird's food) that holds the stones + grit + food during the grinding part of the digestion process. That membrane is always removed before selling the gizzards, so I don't believe there will be any residue there - I never saw one sold with that membrane.


5

Your best choices would be top sirloin (#1 choice), tenderloin, or one of the other (less expensive) sirloin cuts. Those cuts will be tender, flavorful, and without pockets of fat or gristle to mar the appearance of your dish. I don't recommend round because I simply don't like its flavor. Using round in this application might be one of the best ...


5

Apart from the fact that French and British cuts are differently named, the hindquarters are cut at different angles, which is why British cuts tend to be a lot more tender and easy to carve than their French counterparts. Someone commented that 'Fillet doesn't exist in British cuts'? As someone (literally) born & brought up in a butcher's shop, I've ...


4

The USDA NAL has this to say: Refuse: 20% Refuse Description: Bone In addition, you can compare the serving size weight of the breast with skin (145 g) to the weight of the breast with meat only (118 g), each derived from 1/2 chicken breast, so the skin accounts for about 18.6% of the deboned breast and 14.9% of the bone-in breast (accounting for the ...


4

The tentacles and the muscular body of the squid are edible. To clean squid, pull the head and tentacles off the body and remove the skin and fins from the body. Turn the body inside-out, remove the central bone, wash out the inside of the body, and turn the body back into its original shape. Cut the tentacles off of the head, and discard the head and beak....


4

Actually while they are not easily found everywhere, some stores do sell the boneless skin-on chicken thighs and breasts. In fact, I just bought some of the thighs this past week. (I'm in the US, mid-atlantic region.) The reason most stores don't sell them that way is because it's a less popular option and therefore in less demand than bone-in,skin-on or ...


3

Unwrapping the chicken and leaving it uncovered in the refrigerator for a few hours should dry it out a lot. You may want to sponge out the cavity with a paper towel before doing this. If possible, support the chicken on a wire rack above a plate in the refrigerator, rather than placing it directly on the plate. Otherwise, put the chicken breast-down on the ...


3

A book I have (Thai Food by David Thompson - a fantastic book, by the way) suggests washing pork and even blanching in boiling water for any dishes involving boiling/stewing/poaching, as it creates a clearer broth with a clearer flavour (author's words, not mine). I have found I am less likely to get scum and surface impurities in the dish as it cooks.


3

Get rid of the beak, internal shell, and the innards. The rest is edible, tentacles and all.


3

What really matters is the fat content. I suspect that being all thigh meat, it's similar to regular ground turkey, which is 85% lean. Ground turkey breast (or "extra lean" ground turkey) is 99% lean. I've also seen mixtures in the store of light and dark ground meat that clocked in at 93% lean to split the difference. Jennie-O, a large national producer ...


2

Based on your comments, the likely issue is with the pliers you're using. I doubt that the relatively small set included in a multi-function knife is going to have enough grip to hang on to a slippery tendon. I'd try a pair of (very, very clean) needle-nose pliers, like so: They're readily available and inexpensive, so it's probably worth getting a ...


2

A technique that I've seen is to score the skin in strips on the outside and then cut and peel the skin like a band-aid with a sharp knife (paring or boning) aiding the separation. I'm not a butcher, but last time we cured meat, we (two people) went through 100 lbs of fresh meat meticulously in about 20 minutes using this method (the other person was a ...


2

I read somewhere that the British cut beef into about 40 cuts and the French into 200+ cuts so it seems the French have identified taste and texture difference not visible or unimportant to the UK/USA eyes/mouth or just that UK butchers don't think customers can tell. Comparing a butchers shop in France to one in UK or US is eye opening. The attention to ...


2

Veal and beef cuts are completely different, the terminology is not the same at all. With veal the tendron is part of the breast, which includes the foreleg and the front of what would be considered the flank on a full-sized animal, in other words the part that does the most work. The tendron cut includes the lower-front part of the ribs. As for what to ask ...


2

Fastest I've seen with minimal scraping and a little clever trick with a tea towel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OnGKsjCiFOg I should apply this when I'm trimming those racks...


2

A manual butcher's saw will work fine on bone or frozen meat; they cut pretty quickly. (In particular, they will cut much more efficiently than a serrated knife or hacksaw, neither of which has appropriate teeth. Never ever attempt to cut bone with a serrated knife.) Butchers will often use a manual saw instead of a bandsaw for tricky angles or just to avoid ...


2

Lamb shank (lower leg) is best served by long, slow cooking. (It is my favorite cut of lamb.) The upper leg is, in my opinion, best roasted until just pink, although it does not suffer unduly from longer and slower cooking than does, e.g., its beef counterpart. BBC Food, e.g., has a couple of brief discussions on shank and leg. The trick with cooking ...


1

According to this site the frying steak is cut from the thick flank.


1

As a child in the 1940's we were told that you could tell the difference between a skinned cat and a rabbit because one of them had kidneys side by side and the other's kidneys were staggered. I think the rabbits were side by side because they tasted delicious.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible