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61

Generally, you should use unsalted butter. You can always add salt to your unsalted butter, but you can't take it out if you want it less salty! If it's just being melted on some vegetables, then salted butter is probably fine. However, different brands of salted butter have different amounts of salt added, which makes it difficult to know how much total ...


46

You can certainly deep-fry foods in clarified butter (also known as ghee) and in lard. In fact, there are many foods that are traditionally fried in these fats. They both have very high smoke points and are excellent for making crisp fried foods. For example, Puri, Indian fried breads, are deep-fried in ghee (clarified butter). And many Southern USA and ...


33

Butter may look totally amorphous, but there's actually a fair amount of structure in the fat, in particular fat crystals that make it firmer. Melting it disrupts all that structure, and it can't regain it just by resolidifying, so the structure of previously melted butter really is different. You might notice that this is similar to chocolate: if you take ...


33

You don't need raw milk (or more precisely, raw cream). I've made butter from cream many times, but never from unpasteurized cream -- I prefer locally sourced organic cream for reasons, but the actual butter-making process is exactly the same with a pint of store-bought. If you are starting from milk rather than from cream, you will need to get non-...


32

Think shortbread / pie dough: If you have a food processor, dump the butter & dry ingredients in, pulse until you have a coarse crumble. Add some liquid - either your egg (beaten!) or, even simpler, just as much milk as needed to help the dough to stick together. I personally would use milk instead of egg for lighter cookies. Eggs might make them too ...


30

Yes, your butter contains water - which is perfectly normal. While oil is 100% fat, butter is only around 80%1 fat plus some protein and ca. 15% water. Regarding your question where the water comes from - If you look at how butter is made, it becomes obvious that the water was there from the beginning: You start with cow's milk, which has a natural fat ...


29

Part of making butter is churning... the churning process introduces a ton of air into the butter. When you melt it, all of the air is released so you should never expect melted butter to return to the same state it was before it was melted. The air trapped in butter is what causes the lighter color you see... if you take softened butter and whip it (as ...


23

Often, at least in the US, recipes will specifically call for unsalted butter, then call for salt to be added to the recipe — which causes many to scratch their heads. There are three main uses that come to my mind for salt. One is to impart a salty taste. The usage in butter is primarily a secondary one, and that is as a preservative. The third is as a ...


20

I am skeptical that butter from yogurt is a thing. When yogurt is made the milk proteins denature and form a mesh that traps all the large molecules in the milk. Water, sugar, and some small molecules can come out but the fat never does- it's huge and tightly bound up in the gel. Even when yogurt is blended up the whey will separate out but the fat never ...


20

There is indeed a physical change that occurs. If you think back to grade school science you probably remember learning about solutions and suspensions, and how the former is a mixture that stays mixed when left alone (like saltwater) and the latter is a insoluble particles dispersed in a liquid, which separate if left alone (like water and sand if you ...


20

No, you cannot deep-fry in butter. It simply can't handle the heat; it will brown and burn before you reach deep-frying temperatures. In a comment you say that vegetable oils are unstable when heated, but it is in fact the opposite: butter is much more unstable when heated. Butter has a smoke point of 200-250F, around 120-150C. Many vegetable oils have ...


20

No. An edible organic liquid that does not dissolve in water, almost by definition, is an oil. That's not the important thing, though. Substances like mineral oil are edible yet non-nutritive; they pass through the body unchanged and would be compatible with any dietary condition. The problem is that, because they are not digestible and not water-soluble, ...


19

Looks like a misprint for Pound. The point of Pound Cake is that you use the same amount of each ingredient - for example, a pound.


18

Butter is not only fine, but extremely common in baked goods. I think the piece you're missing here is that the oven temperature is not the same as the temperature of the baked goods. The internal temperature of most baked goods never even goes above boiling, unsurprising since there's at least a bit of moisture in there. While the exterior does get hotter, ...


17

If you're in the US, labeling laws actually make it pretty easy to know exactly how much salt is in your butter, and yes, it varies by brand. Salt is sodium chloride, it's 40% sodium by weight. Land O Lakes salted butter (my go-to brand) has 90mg of sodium per tablespoon. That means it has 225mg of salt per tablespoon, or 1.8 grams per stick, 7.2 grams per ...


15

Very, very few pizzas are made with butter. There is no way to make a universal statement, but butter is a rare. Olive oil would be more likely. Many pizza doughs are fat-free, including the traditional pizza di napoli; New York style generally contains olive oil. It is rare for any traditional toppings to contain butter. Some individual cooks might ...


15

Chill it. The butter will solidify and upon remelting the emulsion will be broken. I've never had a butter emulsion not break after chilling.


14

I am sorry, but the accepted answer is incorrect in many details. When chocolate seizes, it is due to a small amount of moisture. Imagine a cup of sugar. It will pour freely. If you add a small amount of water, clumps of the sugar will stick together and stop flowing. Add enough water, and the combination of sugar and water dissolve together, and flow ...


13

Since you ask about other tools, I recommend avoiding the mixer altogether and instead grate frozen butter into the flour. If you have a food processor you can use the coarsest grating blade--chilling the bowl and grater first will help keep the butter cold will help--but it goes quickly by hand with a coarse grater. The key is to get the butter distributed ...


13

You can't really substitute double cream for butter as the fat/water ratio is different - it's basically just too wet. However, guess what they make butter out of - cream! If you 'over whip' cream, the fat separates from the liquid leaving you with fresh butter. Naturally this is easy if you have an electric mixer. If you're doing it by hand, prepare to be ...


12

moved here from a comment: Ghee does have a different aroma and consistency, so, depending on the use of it in the recipe (wether it is used for frying or in the frosting for example), it will quite likely change the final result. So in some cases substituting butter with some neutral flavored oil or margarine might be better than ghee. Which, I know, ...


12

Using salted butter would result in a perceivably salty curd - probably not what you want when expecting a sweet lemon curd. The general rule of thumb is to use unsalted butter for sweet dishes and cakes, especially when the butter makes up a significant percentage of the whole dish. The reason why some recipes simply state “butter” is that not all locales ...


12

I disagree with Stephie's answer above. I find using salted butter does not give a perceptively salty taste but instead helps to bring out the lemon flavour. A pinch of salt or salted butter is recommended in The Kitchen Magpie and Guardian perfect lemon curd. Of course, as Luciano says, if you use unsalted butter you have more control, but I don't think ...


11

The UK supermarkets have the opinion that British people like milder garlic, so most of the garlic you find in the UK supermarkets, even organic garlics, are of a very mild variety. Also, they are bred for yield, in softer soils, so they produce bigger bulbs but less strong. Garlic found in most French and Italian stores is much stronger, as that is what ...


11

A round of bread or butter seems to be a term that is used by some English speakers, but I'm not sure where from. I'm not sure what equivalent measurement it has, if it even has an exact measurement, but I think it has the idea of an entire piece of butter. Survey of English Dialects: Slices of bread alongside a round of butter and a hillock of sea or river ...


10

The comments taken together are essentially an answer. Not all butter is the same. As SAJ14SAJ said, French butter is normally made from cultured cream, giving it a different flavor. Additionally, the quality of butter depends on the quality of the cream it's made from. So even different brands in your grocery store at home will be different, some more ...


10

Commercial butter has about 80% fat, 15% water and 5% solids. Depending on where you are located double cream has 48% fat (UK), 40% (Canada) and the remaining fraction is obviously water and little solids. Supposed, you need 100g butter in your receipe. This means that the dough will have 80g fat and 15g water (for a simple calculation I omit the content ...


10

Butter and shortening behave differently in the cookie dough, so unless you are planning to do more adjustments, I recommend you stick to the given butter-to-shortening ratio. If a recipe uses both, it's often to get the best of two worlds. This leaves the question of flavour. If you use the butter-flavoured shortening, you will get a stronger "butter" ...


10

As @ElectricToothpick said, the milk solids in butter will brown and burn, so that's not a good option. Since ghee has had the milk solids removed, that's not an issue. Traditionally, rendered animal fats like lard were used for deep frying, and french fries were originally fried in beef tallow. McDonald's followed that tradition until health-conscious ...


9

Cook's Illustrated (AKA America's Test Kitchen and Cook's Country) has done taste tests of various brands of butter, salted and unsalted, cultured and not cultured. They found that the single most important thing in unsalted butter was how it was wrapped. Butter wrapped in foil doesn't pick up off flavors from its environment. Land O Lakes (incidentally my ...


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