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60

Generally, you should use unsalted butter. You can always add salt to your unsalted butter, but you can't take it out if you want it less salty! If it's just being melted on some vegetables, then salted butter is probably fine. However, different brands of salted butter have different amounts of salt added, which makes it difficult to know how much total ...


46

You can certainly deep-fry foods in clarified butter (also known as ghee) and in lard. In fact, there are many foods that are traditionally fried in these fats. They both have very high smoke points and are excellent for making crisp fried foods. For example, Puri, Indian fried breads, are deep-fried in ghee (clarified butter). And many Southern USA and ...


35

Butter and margarine freeze perfectly. I generally stock up during sales and thaw it as needed. You just have to make sure it's wrapped tightly in the foil, to prevent oxidation. It'll keep at least 6 months, probably more if you don't have a self-defrosting freezer. Thawing butter does take quite a while, however. I usually give a package a few days to ...


33

You can heat clarified butter to a higher temperature for two reasons -- you remove the milk solids, which can burn, and you remove the water, which will boil at 100°C and cause spattering. In baking, clarified butter's lack of water means that it can't develop gluten as you would with simple melted butter. It's actually more similar to other oils than it ...


32

Think shortbread / pie dough: If you have a food processor, dump the butter & dry ingredients in, pulse until you have a coarse crumble. Add some liquid - either your egg (beaten!) or, even simpler, just as much milk as needed to help the dough to stick together. I personally would use milk instead of egg for lighter cookies. Eggs might make them too ...


31

Butter may look totally amorphous, but there's actually a fair amount of structure in the fat, in particular fat crystals that make it firmer. Melting it disrupts all that structure, and it can't regain it just by resolidifying, so the structure of previously melted butter really is different. You might notice that this is similar to chocolate: if you take ...


31

You don't need raw milk (or more precisely, raw cream). I've made butter from cream many times, but never from unpasteurized cream -- I prefer locally sourced organic cream for reasons, but the actual butter-making process is exactly the same with a pint of store-bought. If you are starting from milk rather than from cream, you will need to get non-...


30

Yes, your butter contains water - which is perfectly normal. While oil is 100% fat, butter is only around 80%1 fat plus some protein and ca. 15% water. Regarding your question where the water comes from - If you look at how butter is made, it becomes obvious that the water was there from the beginning: You start with cow's milk, which has a natural fat ...


29

Part of making butter is churning... the churning process introduces a ton of air into the butter. When you melt it, all of the air is released so you should never expect melted butter to return to the same state it was before it was melted. The air trapped in butter is what causes the lighter color you see... if you take softened butter and whip it (as ...


22

Melt the butter and brush it on with a pastry brush.


21

There are two things you care about when you are making a cake. First, ratio. Second, sequence. The ratio is a weight ratio. For example, a muffin batter has 2 parts flour, 2 pars liquid, 1 part egg, and 1 part fat. You can use different types of liquid to make different kinds of muffins. You can make any amount of batter you want, provided you use the ...


21

Depending on brand, it is approximately 1 1/4 tsp per pound (US), or a little more than 1/4 tsp per stick (4 oz). For most applications, yes it is fine to substitute and adjust; you can just adjust the "salt to taste" step of your recipe in many cases. There are a very few uses (such as yeast raised dough) where you want to be more precise. I would not ...


20

There is some real science on this. See http://naldc.nal.usda.gov/download/15684/PDF When frozen to −20°C butter can last 1 year with no real change in quality


20

There is indeed a physical change that occurs. If you think back to grade school science you probably remember learning about solutions and suspensions, and how the former is a mixture that stays mixed when left alone (like saltwater) and the latter is a insoluble particles dispersed in a liquid, which separate if left alone (like water and sand if you ...


19

I am skeptical that butter from yogurt is a thing. When yogurt is made the milk proteins denature and form a mesh that traps all the large molecules in the milk. Water, sugar, and some small molecules can come out but the fat never does- it's huge and tightly bound up in the gel. Even when yogurt is blended up the whey will separate out but the fat never ...


18

Looks like a misprint for Pound. The point of Pound Cake is that you use the same amount of each ingredient - for example, a pound.


18

No, you cannot deep-fry in butter. It simply can't handle the heat; it will brown and burn before you reach deep-frying temperatures. In a comment you say that vegetable oils are unstable when heated, but it is in fact the opposite: butter is much more unstable when heated. Butter has a smoke point of 200-250F, around 120-150C. Many vegetable oils have ...


17

If you're in the US, labeling laws actually make it pretty easy to know exactly how much salt is in your butter, and yes, it varies by brand. Salt is sodium chloride, it's 40% sodium by weight. Land O Lakes salted butter (my go-to brand) has 90mg of sodium per tablespoon. That means it has 225mg of salt per tablespoon, or 1.8 grams per stick, 7.2 grams per ...


16

The reason is that butter can inhibit gluten formation. It 'coats' the proteins that would form gluten. You knead the dough first to get gluten, and then add the butter afterward around the already formed gluten. You can add it earlier, you just end up with less gluten and a more tender dough. Creaming isn't usually done with bread, as its purpose is air ...


15

Chill it. The butter will solidify and upon remelting the emulsion will be broken. I've never had a butter emulsion not break after chilling.


14

Hah, I get to cite my new copy of McGee's "On Food and Cooking" for the first time! There are several things going on here (all of which can be found in the 2004 edition of McGee, most on page 50). Firstly, as Nathan indicates in his answer, most of the liquid that is sold as buttermilk these days is in fact not "real" buttermilk, but so-called "cultured ...


14

Breads get their structure from glutens--a type of protein formed by the combination of glutenin with gliaten. Kneading and resting the dough helps the formation of glutens--I assume by shifting glutenin and gliatin molecules around, this increases the odds of bindings occurring. Oils can bind to glutenin and gliatin and inhibit these reactions, so fats--...


14

Very, very few pizzas are made with butter. There is no way to make a universal statement, but butter is a rare. Olive oil would be more likely. Many pizza doughs are fat-free, including the traditional pizza di napoli; New York style generally contains olive oil. It is rare for any traditional toppings to contain butter. Some individual cooks might ...


13

Since you ask about other tools, I recommend avoiding the mixer altogether and instead grate frozen butter into the flour. If you have a food processor you can use the coarsest grating blade--chilling the bowl and grater first will help keep the butter cold will help--but it goes quickly by hand with a coarse grater. The key is to get the butter distributed ...


13

You can't really substitute double cream for butter as the fat/water ratio is different - it's basically just too wet. However, guess what they make butter out of - cream! If you 'over whip' cream, the fat separates from the liquid leaving you with fresh butter. Naturally this is easy if you have an electric mixer. If you're doing it by hand, prepare to be ...


12

Raising the smoke point is the first reason. The second is that you remove most of the milk solids when clarifying, so people who are lactose intolerant can usually eat clarified butter. And third, clarified butter can be kept at room temperature without spoiling. I keep mine in a french butter keeper on the counter for up to a week.


11

You won't get a buttery taste from adding butter to the dough. Even in fat-rich batters like pound cake, the difference between butter and a neutral fat is subtle - it is there, but it doesn't taste like biting into a buttered toast. And in a pizza, you can't add such amounts of fat to the dough, because it will interfere with gluten production, resulting in ...


11

There are many factors in play such as the type of sugars, amount of eggs or other sources of hydration, amount and type of leavening and so forth, but as an overall generalization: Melting the butter will lead to chewier cookies Creaming colder/room temperature butter with sugar will lead to cookies with a higher, more cake like texture. Refrigerating the ...


11

Butter is about 80% milkfat, and 20% water, more or less. 3/4 stick is 6 tablespoons. You should be able to substitute six tablespoons of coconut oil one to one. It should be well within the tolerance of the recipe. If you really want to account for the water, you would do about 5 tbl of coconut oil, and 1 tbl of liquid.


11

The UK supermarkets have the opinion that British people like milder garlic, so most of the garlic you find in the UK supermarkets, even organic garlics, are of a very mild variety. Also, they are bred for yield, in softer soils, so they produce bigger bulbs but less strong. Garlic found in most French and Italian stores is much stronger, as that is what ...


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