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45

You can certainly deep-fry foods in clarified butter (also known as ghee) and in lard. In fact, there are many foods that are traditionally fried in these fats. They both have very high smoke points and are excellent for making crisp fried foods. For example, Puri, Indian fried breads, are deep-fried in ghee (clarified butter). And many Southern USA and ...


23

Often, at least in the US, recipes will specifically call for unsalted butter, then call for salt to be added to the recipe — which causes many to scratch their heads. There are three main uses that come to my mind for salt. One is to impart a salty taste. The usage in butter is primarily a secondary one, and that is as a preservative. The third is as a ...


19

No, you cannot deep-fry in butter. It simply can't handle the heat; it will brown and burn before you reach deep-frying temperatures. In a comment you say that vegetable oils are unstable when heated, but it is in fact the opposite: butter is much more unstable when heated. Butter has a smoke point of 200-250F, around 120-150C. Many vegetable oils have ...


12

Using salted butter would result in a perceivably salty curd - probably not what you want when expecting a sweet lemon curd. The general rule of thumb is to use unsalted butter for sweet dishes and cakes, especially when the butter makes up a significant percentage of the whole dish. The reason why some recipes simply state “butter” is that not all locales ...


12

I disagree with Stephie's answer above. I find using salted butter does not give a perceptively salty taste but instead helps to bring out the lemon flavour. A pinch of salt or salted butter is recommended in The Kitchen Magpie and Guardian perfect lemon curd. Of course, as Luciano says, if you use unsalted butter you have more control, but I don't think ...


9

As @ElectricToothpick said, the milk solids in butter will brown and burn, so that's not a good option. Since ghee has had the milk solids removed, that's not an issue. Traditionally, rendered animal fats like lard were used for deep frying, and french fries were originally fried in beef tallow. McDonald's followed that tradition until health-conscious ...


8

You can make a roux with any fat. Olive oil will certainly work. There are also other methods for thickening a gravy, such as the addition of cornstarch or arrowroot.


7

I think the problem is that the browned butter lacked water the recipe was relying on. the only sources of liquid in the recipe is the eggs and the butter, so losing one of those sources would make a big difference Butter ordinarily has some water in it, I've seen numbers like 16-20% water, the rest being fats and milk solids. That water has to be ...


7

Electronic Toothpick is correct about deep frying in butter. Lard, however, is perfectly acceptable for deep frying. French fries taste better fried in lard (imho). Solid fats in general are still used; especially in commercial establishments. The biggest drawback is waiting for the fat to liquefy and heat up to temperature compared to vegetable oils.


6

For cooking in general it's usually better to use unsalted butter. You can always add more salt if needed (and in the correct amount) but it's not easy to control the salt properly if you have to add more butter. So your lemon curd could be ok but it might taste slightly funny, depending on the amount of salt in your butter. Butter can be frozen for months, ...


5

Commercial peanut butter is shelf stable for several months in your pantry, however it is not acidic enough for home canning. When you remove most of the air in home canned goods you are actually setting up a good environment for botulism to grow. Botulism can’t thrive in an acidic conditions, that is why a low ph is essential for safe home canning.


5

Provided the butter is not too salty, it should not affect the consistency or setting, but it will add an extra flavour dimension to the fudge. I don't know what ratios you will be using, but salt and sometimes chilli is added to chocolate to add extra flavour. Personally, I would not find a little bit of salt to balance out the sweetness unpleasant, but ...


4

It depends on how much butter the recipe calls for relative to other ingredients--and what those other ingredients are. Amount of butter: How much butter matters? Usually if the taste or texture of the final product is buttery then there's enough butter in it that the salted-ness of the butter matters. On the other hand, if the final product does not ...


3

I would toss it. The only thing where it's generally considered safe to eat around the mold is hard cheeses. In general there will be mold spores in lower concentrations throughout the container, but you only see the areas with high concentration with your bare eyes. The lower concentrations can still make you ill.


3

Not specifically butter, but to the extent that butter is cream and salt: A pinch of salt will make coffee less bitter — and I’ve heard that trick referred to as an “old church social” and also a “military” thing so I’d say part of your (salted) butter trick is widespread. And cream is also widely used. Both-in-one does sound fairly unique though.


3

I had the same problem by using margarine instead of butter, thought it would be ok because it said it was used for baking on the package, but mine was so soft and looked up receipes where you had to refrigerate the dough so I just put in the freezer for a few mins, got a little stiff and was able to make some crooked Christmas trees into fall leaves.. happy ...


3

Clarified butter has plenty of butter flavor. The general reason for making it in the first place is so you can heat it to high temperatures without burning. If you re-introduce or keep the milk solids, you have defeated the whole point of clarified butter. You might as well just use regular butter.


3

Chocolate turns white due to "fat bloom", that is, the fat content of the chocolate wanders to the surface and crystallizes into this white bloom that you observe. This can be avoided if you cool your chocolate in a cool, but not cold spot. 18 °C or about 65 F seems to be the sweet spot for this. Source here. Alternatively, you could try to reduce the fat ...


2

Acids, such as cream of tartar, can interfere with the formation of crystals by inverting sugars. Without it, you need to be more careful/lucky... To quote Cooks Illustrated [It's for simple syrup but point still holds]: Simple syrup crystallizes when enough of the sugar molecules stick to one another that they become insoluble in the water... To find a ...


2

60F that is what you need to remember. Butter need to reach 60F before you can start creaming with sugar. Colder than that is too hard. 65 is ideal, but when the hand mixer works the butter is going to get some heat. Once it is hotter than 68F you have reached point of no return. It is now waste


2

I did my science research project on this and found that the softened butter will result in chewier, and smaller cookie than with melted butter. The cookie with melted butter will also be thinner. I also figured out that if you use double the melted butter you get a WIDE, thin, and crispy cookie and with half the butter you get a small, chewy, and what I ...


2

While different cookers have different opinions about how hot "high" and "low" actually are, I still wouldn't gloss over such a large discrepancy, unless I knew enough to make the call. However, you can easily lower the temp of your crockpot on it's high setting. Try putting a terrycloth rag between the metal case and ceramic pot. This will reduce the heat ...


2

Salt can have a physical effect on certain ingredients. Some fruits and vegetables start to lose their water through osmosis when they get in contact with salt. Depending on the recipe, additional moisture in the pan might or might not be desired during certain phases. This can be a reason for specific instructions regarding when to add how much salt to the ...


1

If you are making it at home and in a "small amount" it's okay to use salted butter and will not affect the taste. I often use salted butter at home in my sweet recipes because I think a pinch of salt enhances flavour.


1

It sounds like you need to temper your chocolate this website covers how to do that and why it needs to be done in exhaustive detail: http://www.cookingforengineers.com/article/155/Tempering-Chocolate


1

Yes-ish. Managed to make something similar with margarine, almond milk, flour and nutritional yeast flakes (was going for a cheese-style sauce for mac and vegan-cheese). Don't ask me for the recipe, I don't have exact ratio but here's my order of operations: boil almond milk, add mustard, flour, salt and any other seasonings you want, then once a boil has ...


1

As mentioned above, almost all heavy creams (ie whipping creams) have emulsifiers (gums) that keep the cream from separating (ideal for making whipping cream). I just made a batch of cultured heavy cream and found that my kitchenaid stand mixer was not able to churn the cream enough to separate it...It mixed and mixed and mixed without any separation...I ...


1

You could theoretically salvage the butter, but it really boils down to mold type. Melting and filtrating the butter will get rid of the mold and create ghee. But filtration will not remove aflatoxins that some types of molds produce.


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