Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

Hot answers tagged

45

You can certainly deep-fry foods in clarified butter (also known as ghee) and in lard. In fact, there are many foods that are traditionally fried in these fats. They both have very high smoke points and are excellent for making crisp fried foods. For example, Puri, Indian fried breads, are deep-fried in ghee (clarified butter). And many Southern USA and ...


19

No, you cannot deep-fry in butter. It simply can't handle the heat; it will brown and burn before you reach deep-frying temperatures. In a comment you say that vegetable oils are unstable when heated, but it is in fact the opposite: butter is much more unstable when heated. Butter has a smoke point of 200-250F, around 120-150C. Many vegetable oils have ...


9

As @ElectricToothpick said, the milk solids in butter will brown and burn, so that's not a good option. Since ghee has had the milk solids removed, that's not an issue. Traditionally, rendered animal fats like lard were used for deep frying, and french fries were originally fried in beef tallow. McDonald's followed that tradition until health-conscious ...


7

Electronic Toothpick is correct about deep frying in butter. Lard, however, is perfectly acceptable for deep frying. French fries taste better fried in lard (imho). Solid fats in general are still used; especially in commercial establishments. The biggest drawback is waiting for the fat to liquefy and heat up to temperature compared to vegetable oils.


7

You want emulsification. Emulsification is the breaking up a fat and dispersing it into a liquid (or vice versa, dispersing a liquid in a fat). A classic example of an emulsification, also known as an emulsion, is mayonnaise. There are at least two good ways you can emulsify your brown butter, soy sauce, and lemon juice. One way is called shearing, which ...


7

I think the problem is that the browned butter lacked water the recipe was relying on. the only sources of liquid in the recipe is the eggs and the butter, so losing one of those sources would make a big difference Butter ordinarily has some water in it, I've seen numbers like 16-20% water, the rest being fats and milk solids. That water has to be ...


6

I haven't tried it personally, so this is purely hypothetical. Clarified butter has a smoke point of 252 degrees Celsius, which is well above the temperature one would use to deep fry anything. So deep frying in clarified butter should be possible. I would not however try to infuse the butter with anything. Infusing it would mean adding oils from herbs or ...


5

Commercial peanut butter is shelf stable for several months in your pantry, however it is not acidic enough for home canning. When you remove most of the air in home canned goods you are actually setting up a good environment for botulism to grow. Botulism can’t thrive in an acidic conditions, that is why a low ph is essential for safe home canning.


5

If this sauce is your own creative invention** and you make it a little different each time, it sounds like you aren't averse to experimentation... So my suggestion would be to try substituting a little bit of cream (fairly heavy cream, like whipping cream) for some of the butter. Yes, cream is also just full of butterfat, but the homogenized nature of it ...


4

Definitely yes, and they will probably taste better. 1:1 substitution.


4

The (alleged) problem with extra fat during SV is that, flavor molecules will dissolve in fat and subsequently be discarded. The claim is that, this causes the loss of flavor. For searing it’s fine to use butter or other fat.


3

I would toss it. The only thing where it's generally considered safe to eat around the mold is hard cheeses. In general there will be mold spores in lower concentrations throughout the container, but you only see the areas with high concentration with your bare eyes. The lower concentrations can still make you ill.


3

Butter is composed of fat (about 80%), water (18%), and milk solids (2%). Aaronut's answer above is excellent and gives many times you can't substitute butter, but when you can, if you want to get it exact, you can use the above ratio and decrease the liquid in the recipe. For example, instead of 80g oil, use 100g butter and decrease the water in the ...


3

Not specifically butter, but to the extent that butter is cream and salt: A pinch of salt will make coffee less bitter — and I’ve heard that trick referred to as an “old church social” and also a “military” thing so I’d say part of your (salted) butter trick is widespread. And cream is also widely used. Both-in-one does sound fairly unique though.


3

Clarified butter has plenty of butter flavor. The general reason for making it in the first place is so you can heat it to high temperatures without burning. If you re-introduce or keep the milk solids, you have defeated the whole point of clarified butter. You might as well just use regular butter.


2

It looks to me like you could be using too much butter. My recipe for chocolate chip cookies has this: 2 c flour (this is ~240g) 1 c butter 1/2 c sugar 1/2 c packed brown sugar 2 eggs 1 tsp b soda 1 tsp salt 1 tsp vanilla 1 or 2 c chocolate chips Melted butter is supposed to make the cookies chewier than using softened. I'd reduce the butter to 1 stick +...


2

I did my science research project on this and found that the softened butter will result in chewier, and smaller cookie than with melted butter. The cookie with melted butter will also be thinner. I also figured out that if you use double the melted butter you get a WIDE, thin, and crispy cookie and with half the butter you get a small, chewy, and what I ...


2

I just made three trays of these and they turned out grainy and not set-up. I followed the recipe I was using and boiled for 3 minutes at a rolling boil before pouring on crackers and baking. Since I was going to toss them anyway, I put them back in the oven (with chocolate, nuts and sprinkles on them). I used an oven thermometer and waited until the ...


2

4th & Heart makes a ghee oil that remains liquid at room temperature by blending 60 percent ghee & 40 percent grape seed oil. It's pourable. Don't know if that helps.


1

I agree with Shannon. That said, if you're interested in trying something with a slightly different flavor, peanut butter will also help your cookies avoid spreading, and can make a tasty addition to chocolate chip cookies. Try adding 1 tbsp of peanut butter to the recipe, if you're interested.


1

I agree with Jolene.. above. It sounds like the easiest way to fix your problem would be to cut a little bit of cream into your sauce. Maybe use half the amount of butter and add a little cream? What’s happening is the butter is breaking under high heat and therefore separating. Cream would do the same thing but you would have to actually reduce it quite a ...


1

I would try adding an additional tsp of lemon juice. acids are often used to cut that fatty film left on your palate from rich foods. Other than that I'm not sure...you mentioned not wanting to dilute the flavor by adding more pasta, so I'm sure you would not like any result found by leaving out the butter. If you wanted to try something with a little ...


1

Yes-ish. Managed to make something similar with margarine, almond milk, flour and nutritional yeast flakes (was going for a cheese-style sauce for mac and vegan-cheese). Don't ask me for the recipe, I don't have exact ratio but here's my order of operations: boil almond milk, add mustard, flour, salt and any other seasonings you want, then once a boil has ...


1

You could theoretically salvage the butter, but it really boils down to mold type. Melting and filtrating the butter will get rid of the mold and create ghee. But filtration will not remove aflatoxins that some types of molds produce.


1

This was an issue I had that drove me crazy for such a long time! We're talking throwing-spatulas-across-the-kitchen-frustrated. The magic fix is to use ONLY PURE CANE SUGAR. I know it sounds too easy, but after reading labels on the sugar I was buying (store brand because, hello, it's cheaper and what's the difference, really?) I noticed that the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible