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60

Generally, you should use unsalted butter. You can always add salt to your unsalted butter, but you can't take it out if you want it less salty! If it's just being melted on some vegetables, then salted butter is probably fine. However, different brands of salted butter have different amounts of salt added, which makes it difficult to know how much total ...


46

You can certainly deep-fry foods in clarified butter (also known as ghee) and in lard. In fact, there are many foods that are traditionally fried in these fats. They both have very high smoke points and are excellent for making crisp fried foods. For example, Puri, Indian fried breads, are deep-fried in ghee (clarified butter). And many Southern USA and ...


18

No, you cannot deep-fry in butter. It simply can't handle the heat; it will brown and burn before you reach deep-frying temperatures. In a comment you say that vegetable oils are unstable when heated, but it is in fact the opposite: butter is much more unstable when heated. Butter has a smoke point of 200-250F, around 120-150C. Many vegetable oils have ...


9

It does matter, using salted butter changes the salt content of the dish, which will change the flavor. It probably won't greatly affect the chemistry of a dish aside from that, however. In my experience it's much more common to see unsalted butter in recipes, so I almost always default to unsalted if the recipe doesn't specify. If they meant salted ...


9

As @ElectricToothpick said, the milk solids in butter will brown and burn, so that's not a good option. Since ghee has had the milk solids removed, that's not an issue. Traditionally, rendered animal fats like lard were used for deep frying, and french fries were originally fried in beef tallow. McDonald's followed that tradition until health-conscious ...


7

Good question! It depends on the dish being made. Easy rule of thumb: Savory/seasoned as a main dish or meat = salted butter Sweet, fruit or greens heavy = unsalted Also - you can make melted/browned butter easily, by slowly melting the butter so you have a stable cooking medium.


7

You want emulsification. Emulsification is the breaking up a fat and dispersing it into a liquid (or vice versa, dispersing a liquid in a fat). A classic example of an emulsification, also known as an emulsion, is mayonnaise. There are at least two good ways you can emulsify your brown butter, soy sauce, and lemon juice. One way is called shearing, which ...


7

This may be somewhat country-specific. Here in the UK, sweetness levels which may be considered normal for the US palate are generally considered overkill here. Using salted butter can provide a balance to the flavour which is missing in unsalted butter. Adding salt separately can solve that problem, of course. But with salt levels being relatively ...


7

I think the problem is that the browned butter lacked water the recipe was relying on. the only sources of liquid in the recipe is the eggs and the butter, so losing one of those sources would make a big difference Butter ordinarily has some water in it, I've seen numbers like 16-20% water, the rest being fats and milk solids. That water has to be ...


7

Electronic Toothpick is correct about deep frying in butter. Lard, however, is perfectly acceptable for deep frying. French fries taste better fried in lard (imho). Solid fats in general are still used; especially in commercial establishments. The biggest drawback is waiting for the fat to liquefy and heat up to temperature compared to vegetable oils.


6

In the UK, if a recipe just calls for "butter", it is asking for salted butter. This is because historically all butter was "salted butter", with "unsalted butter" being very expensive before the advent of refrigeration due to its low shelf life. Additionally, the majority of products labelled "butter" will be salted butter, with the unsalted butter being ...


6

We're not all going to agree on a definition of cultured butter, so these answers are going to be subjective. Culture distillate (https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cdrh/cfdocs/cfcfr/CFRSearch.cfm?fr=184.1848) and lactic acid are both used for flavoring. Is cultured butter butter that tastes a certain way, or butter that's been prepared a certain way? ...


6

I haven't tried it personally, so this is purely hypothetical. Clarified butter has a smoke point of 252 degrees Celsius, which is well above the temperature one would use to deep fry anything. So deep frying in clarified butter should be possible. I would not however try to infuse the butter with anything. Infusing it would mean adding oils from herbs or ...


5

If this sauce is your own creative invention** and you make it a little different each time, it sounds like you aren't averse to experimentation... So my suggestion would be to try substituting a little bit of cream (fairly heavy cream, like whipping cream) for some of the butter. Yes, cream is also just full of butterfat, but the homogenized nature of it ...


5

There's two methods for this, which can also be combined. The first, as several people have mentioned, is to make sure that the eggs and water are slightly above room temperature. At 27C/80F ghee (and, for that matter, butter) is liquid, so if you can ensure that the rest of the batter is that temperature, it will stay liquid when mixed. The easiest way ...


5

Commercial peanut butter is shelf stable for several months in your pantry, however it is not acidic enough for home canning. When you remove most of the air in home canned goods you are actually setting up a good environment for botulism to grow. Botulism can’t thrive in an acidic conditions, that is why a low ph is essential for safe home canning.


4

Salt and butter have two very different functions. Using them together does not allow you to control them separately. For example, if you need more fat but the dish is already salted, you need butter but not salt. Therefore, if you want to be as accurate as possible, use unsalted butter.


4

Definitely yes, and they will probably taste better. 1:1 substitution.


4

The (alleged) problem with extra fat during SV is that, flavor molecules will dissolve in fat and subsequently be discarded. The claim is that, this causes the loss of flavor. For searing it’s fine to use butter or other fat.


4

I would toss it. The only thing where it's generally considered safe to eat around the mold is hard cheeses. In general there will be mold spores in lower concentrations throughout the container, but you only see the areas with high concentration with your bare eyes. The lower concentrations can still make you ill.


3

"Softened" butter will flex if you try to bend the unwrapped stick. You can actually get the ends to 90 degrees to each other when you have it just right. "Over softened" is when you can't even pick it up to try to flex it. This actually happens before it fully melts. The problem is that you need the butter to be at the right consistency when you're ...


3

If the ghee was too hot, the eggs would cook on contact with it, so you can simply increase the temperature. Melting it in a heavy bowl (ceramic or Pyrex) would hold a bit more heat, even at sensibly low temperature, so that might help. You may have let it cool too much - it will drop to just above it's melting point, then the addition of cold stuff will ...


3

Just a note on all of this - it is not necessarily just about the taste. A few people have touched on the shelf life, which also makes a difference. Salted butter is designed to last longer, therefore when doing things like baking - where you want to use the freshest ingredients for a better result - you should always use unsalted, because it will be ...


3

Butter is composed of fat (about 80%), water (18%), and milk solids (2%). Aaronut's answer above is excellent and gives many times you can't substitute butter, but when you can, if you want to get it exact, you can use the above ratio and decrease the liquid in the recipe. For example, instead of 80g oil, use 100g butter and decrease the water in the ...


3

Clarified butter has plenty of butter flavor. The general reason for making it in the first place is so you can heat it to high temperatures without burning. If you re-introduce or keep the milk solids, you have defeated the whole point of clarified butter. You might as well just use regular butter.


2

I did my science research project on this and found that the softened butter will result in chewier, and smaller cookie than with melted butter. The cookie with melted butter will also be thinner. I also figured out that if you use double the melted butter you get a WIDE, thin, and crispy cookie and with half the butter you get a small, chewy, and what I ...


2

I just made three trays of these and they turned out grainy and not set-up. I followed the recipe I was using and boiled for 3 minutes at a rolling boil before pouring on crackers and baking. Since I was going to toss them anyway, I put them back in the oven (with chocolate, nuts and sprinkles on them). I used an oven thermometer and waited until the ...


2

The exhaustively researched Serious Eats article `The Science of the Best Chocolate Chip Cookies' has some relevant ideas. In particular: browning the butter beforehand (as in a buerre-noisette) brings out its nutty flavours. Since this removes moisture, it might be necessary to compensate by adding a bit more egg or egg yolk. Melting the butter gives a ...


2

4th & Heart makes a ghee oil that remains liquid at room temperature by blending 60 percent ghee & 40 percent grape seed oil. It's pourable. Don't know if that helps.


2

Not specifically butter, but to the extent that butter is cream and salt: A pinch of salt will make coffee less bitter — and I’ve heard that trick referred to as an “old church social” and also a “military” thing so I’d say part of your (salted) butter trick is widespread. And cream is also widely used. Both-in-one does sound fairly unique though.


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