New answers tagged

1

I will make a guess in light of the new information. If the quality that interests you is being similar to the cream collecting on top of raw milk, then the process difference here is underchurning. Cream is just an intermediate stage between milk and butter. If you stop it earlier, your butter will be more similar to cream than if you stop it later. The ...


2

While I am not completely sure what texture difference you are seeing, and I would not necessarily describe store-bought butter as 'oily', I can think of a reason why the texture of homemade butter is different: air. Depending on your method, when churning butter at home, you usually incorporate some air into the butter, giving it a 'fluffier' texture. This ...


2

Here are some different options for non-dairy frosting without vegan butter. Then I got on a roll, and came up with some non-frosting suggestions. Make your own vegan butter, then use it in a buttercream frosting recipe. Tofu cream cheese frosting. Drain and press some tofu. Substitute the tofu plus some vegan coconut yogurt into a cream cheese frosting ...


1

I have never heard of anybody trying that, but beeswax may fulfill the role butter usually has in puff pastry. According to wikipedia and my own experience, "beeswax is edible, having similar negligible toxicity to plant waxes, and is approved for food use in most countries." This page suggests to use it instead of oil or butter to grease cookie ...


4

Cocoa butter isn't like regular butter as it is very hard at room temperature. It's what makes chocolate so hard when cooled, so it's not ideal for a creamy frosting. There are many other alternatives that would work better, for instance vegan butters which are designed to mimic butter's properties. Some vegetable shortenings can work as well, although they ...


20

No. An edible organic liquid that does not dissolve in water, almost by definition, is an oil. That's not the important thing, though. Substances like mineral oil are edible yet non-nutritive; they pass through the body unchanged and would be compatible with any dietary condition. The problem is that, because they are not digestible and not water-soluble, ...


1

Graininess is a matter of perspective. Unfortunately, the American buttercream you're going for is inherently on the grainier side. There are ways to adulterate it so that it's smoother, but in doing so, you'll get away from a pure American buttercream. Contrary to what one commenter said, butter/powdered sugar as a frosting is purely an American invention, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included