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34 votes

What should I use for old recipes that call for 'buttermilk'?

Given the variabilities in "buttermilk" from place to place and time to time, you should get sufficiently equivalent results by substituting modern cultured buttermilk. That's the job it was designed ...
Joshua Engel's user avatar
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23 votes
Accepted

How does buttermilk affect a waffle recipe?

The role of buttermilk in most recipes, including waffles, is to provide acid into the reaction with baking soda to cause it to 'rise' more. The thickness helps the batter retain the air pockets that ...
Cos Callis's user avatar
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18 votes

What should I use for old recipes that call for 'buttermilk'?

In the end, it seems that what the usage is, determines the product being called for. I found an interesting Slate article about buttermilk. Apparently, over the years, the word "buttermilk" has ...
Catija's user avatar
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12 votes
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Irish soda bread kneading process

You don't knead soda bread for long, some methods call for no kneading at all. One reason is texture, soda bread should be a bit crumbly, stretchy isn't what you are aiming for. The other reason is to ...
GdD's user avatar
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11 votes

What should I use for old recipes that call for 'buttermilk'?

My mother and father were both raised on farms in the early 1900's. They did not use soured milk to make butter. They used fresh milk that was neither homogenized or pasteurized. I have had fresh ...
Cindy's user avatar
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11 votes
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Pie with 2 different fillings

Frankly, I'd be too lazy to fiddle with a "separating wall" shell - partly because unless very well supported its likely to collapse during blind baking anyway. My tool of choice would be a small ...
Stephie's user avatar
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11 votes
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Is Irish buttermilk different from Estonian buttermilk?

Just to confirm what Joe said with some sources, the Estonian Dairy Association confirms that Estonian buttermilk or pett is a fermented product. That is, one takes milk and adds a culture of lactic ...
Athanasius's user avatar
  • 32.2k
7 votes

Is Irish buttermilk different from Estonian buttermilk?

It sounds like what you're getting is "cultured buttermilk", which as you noted, is not the leftover liquid from having made butter, but is basically runny yogurt. I'm not familiar with Irish ...
Joe's user avatar
  • 80.9k
6 votes

Add fresh yogurt to whipping cream to make creme fraiche?

No, creme fraiche needs specific cultures, which are not yogurt cultures, and lower fermentation temperature. If you use yogurt with Lactobacilicus Bulgaricus to innoculate your cream, and a ...
rumtscho's user avatar
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6 votes
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What to do with leftover cream after churning butter?

Technically, this is "buttermilk" - the milk left over from churning butter. Of course, this is sweet buttermilk, so it won't really work for most recipes calling for buttermilk (they assume the ...
Megha's user avatar
  • 11.8k
6 votes

Can I use Laban (a yogurt drink) as a substitute for buttermilk?

Probably. I rarely have buttermilk around, and I most commonly substitute yogurt mixed with water. The kind of laban you're talking about* would be a similar mixture. King Arthur Baking Company has ...
Juhasz's user avatar
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5 votes

How can buttermilk marinade for raw chicken be used afterwards?

I don't know about buttermilk marinade. You can reuse marinade used for meat if you cook/boil it enough to kill bacterias. https://www.thespruceeats.com/making-marinades-safe-331649 "The most ...
Max's user avatar
  • 20.4k
5 votes

Pie with 2 different fillings

Pre-filling: Filled: Sliced: (sorry for poor quality, most of pie was eaten before I got this) So... worked okay. The internal wall did a good job keeping the fillings separated, but did seem to ...
rpierce's user avatar
  • 153
5 votes

Is buttermilk another term for sour milk or some part of sour milk?

Buttermilk is the byproduct of butter making. Butter is made by agitating cream (-> the fatty part of milk) resulting in clumps of fat and a milky white liquid that contains nearly no fat and some ...
Stephie's user avatar
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4 votes
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Bread recipe calls for dry milk powder. Can I use dry buttermilk powder?

You'll be fine doing a straight substitution. Well, maybe I shouldn't be so definitive since these are powders we're talking about and it's not quite the same thing, but I've substituted buttermilk ...
Chris Bergin's user avatar
4 votes

Did I just get butter out of a milk centrifuge?

As always with sticking things into categories, there is no clear answer. You can choose yourself whether you want to consider it butter or not. Milk, cream and butter all lie on a spectrum, with milk ...
rumtscho's user avatar
  • 139k
3 votes
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When can milk substitute for buttermilk in sourdough recipes?

I think your understanding here is incorrect. The idea is to leave it overnight and let the sourdough SCOBY incorporate the buttermilk culture. With a mature, functioning starter, there won't be ...
rumtscho's user avatar
  • 139k
3 votes
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Why do you need buttermilk to marinate chicken before frying?

Rich, slightly acidic buttermilk makes a good marinade for deep fried chicken for a couple of reasons: The acidity and milk fats help to break down the outer skin of the chicken so it gets crispier ...
James McLeod's user avatar
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3 votes
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What is the advantage of using buttermilk in baking?

Historically, milk was accumulated in the churn until there was enough to be worth making butter. The milk would, of course, ferment. Both the butter and the watery buttermilk took the sour, fermented ...
Sobachatina's user avatar
  • 47.5k
3 votes

What should I use for old recipes that call for 'buttermilk'?

To substitute for buttermilk, mix one cup of regular milk with 1 tablespoon of white vinegar or lemon juice. Stir; let the mixture stand for approximately five minutes. Modify proportions ...
David W's user avatar
  • 163
2 votes

how to make a "biting" buttermilk

I'm not quite sure what precisely creates the "biting" flavor/effect you're discussing, but I imagine it's a different mixture of acidity or something (since you also notice it in pickles). Anyhow, I ...
Athanasius's user avatar
  • 32.2k
2 votes

Buttermilk substitute?

A vegan alternative that can work for some recipes is to add lemon juice to almond milk. This worked very good for me to make soda bread, in which the acidic quality of buttermilk reacts with baking ...
ElmerCat's user avatar
  • 2,719
2 votes

Culture fresh buttermilk with yogurt

In addition to rumtscho's excellent answer, I thought I would add some information about culturing buttermilk from milk to make "cultured buttermilk". Buttermilk culture is its own distinct bacterial ...
FuzzyChef's user avatar
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2 votes
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Culture fresh buttermilk with yogurt

You seem to have gotten the process backwards. You don't culture the buttermilk. You culture the milk, then whip the butter, and the rest is cultured buttermilk, at least if you are going for ...
rumtscho's user avatar
  • 139k
2 votes
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Food industry: where does buttermilk go?

If it's made from 'sweet cream', and not soured milk (it's easier to churn soured milk, so this was typical in the old days), then what's left is skim milk ... although there might be an extra buttery ...
Joe's user avatar
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2 votes

Is buttermilk another term for sour milk or some part of sour milk?

No, it is not. Let us consider three dairy products: Fermented Skimmed Milk: when butter is made from raw milk in a hand-churn, a very milky whey is left behind. This leftover skimmed milk can be ...
FuzzyChef's user avatar
  • 65.2k
1 vote

Is sour milk, soured milk, and milk that has gone sour, all the exact same thing?

Yes, it is the same. It refers to milk which has been left out until it has gone sour with whatever wild bacteria it has managed to catch, be they pathogenic, healthy, or neutral. It curdles a bit and ...
rumtscho's user avatar
  • 139k
1 vote

Baking Powder, Baking Soda, and Yeast

The buttermilk is acidic enough that it interferes with the environment that commercial yeast needs to reproduce well I don't think this is the case. Yeast prefers a mildly to moderately acidic ...
Beejamin's user avatar
  • 400
1 vote

Salt won't dissolve in buttermilk brine

Have you tried dissolving the salt before adding it to the buttermilk? I would suggest dissolving the salt using boiling water. Put the salt in a small heat-proof container, add boiling water, and ...
Cindy's user avatar
  • 18.3k
1 vote

Salt won't dissolve in buttermilk brine

You should just heat it (your first proposed solution), and not worry about changing flavor, because if buttermilk is going to change flavor with heat then it is going to change flavor when you cook ...
paparazzo's user avatar
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