34

Given the variabilities in "buttermilk" from place to place and time to time, you should get sufficiently equivalent results by substituting modern cultured buttermilk. That's the job it was designed to do. Recipes from the early 19th century and before are notoriously vague. They were generally written more as reminders of something you already knew ...


24

The role of buttermilk in most recipes, including waffles, is to provide acid into the reaction with baking soda to cause it to 'rise' more. The thickness helps the batter retain the air pockets that the acid + baking soda creates when heat is applied, resulting in a 'lighter fluffier' waffle.


19

In the end, it seems that what the usage is, determines the product being called for. I found an interesting Slate article about buttermilk. Apparently, over the years, the word "buttermilk" has referred to three different products: So, prior to the 20th century, buttermilk could refer to at least three different categories of beverage: regular old milk ...


18

Technically, this is not precisely buttermilk, but it's pretty close in both composition and usage. The term "buttermilk" can actually refer to a wide range of fermented milk varieties. Traditionally, buttermilk was produced by allowing natural bacteria present in cream to ferment some of the sugar lactose into lactic acid. This made churning butter from ...


14

Hah, I get to cite my new copy of McGee's "On Food and Cooking" for the first time! There are several things going on here (all of which can be found in the 2004 edition of McGee, most on page 50). Firstly, as Nathan indicates in his answer, most of the liquid that is sold as buttermilk these days is in fact not "real" buttermilk, but so-called "cultured ...


11

Frankly, I'd be too lazy to fiddle with a "separating wall" shell - partly because unless very well supported its likely to collapse during blind baking anyway. My tool of choice would be a small cake ring or, in a pinch, a strip of aluminum foil, folded a few times and shaped into a circle. Place the ring on the prebaked shell, pour the fillings into the ...


10

My mother and father were both raised on farms in the early 1900's. They did not use soured milk to make butter. They used fresh milk that was neither homogenized or pasteurized. I have had fresh churned butter and the remaining buttermilk on family farms when I was a bit younger. There was no sour taste. In fact the buttermilk was quite sweet. The ...


10

It is true that Saco Buttermilk Blend contains no live cultures. If you can have any further questions, please feel free to call our consumer line at 1-800-373-7226. We are happy to answer any questions you may have about our product! Amy Verheyden Director of Consumer Affairs Saco Foods, Inc.


10

Two things: First, commercially available buttermilk is actually milk that has been slightly cultured to increase the amount of lactic acid; that's why it tastes tart. My grandmother used to make 'buttermilk' by leaving some milk on the counter to let it ferment. Because of the increased amount of acid, a lot of recipes (like buns or biscuits) mix ...


9

Just to confirm what Joe said with some sources, the Estonian Dairy Association confirms that Estonian buttermilk or pett is a fermented product. That is, one takes milk and adds a culture of lactic acid bacteria (similar to how yogurt is made, though typically buttermilk is fermented with slightly different bacteria at lower temperatures, resulting in a ...


7

It appears that the product closest to American cultured buttermilk is Dickmilch. As noted here, This fermented dairy product known as cultured buttermilk is produced from cow's milk and has a characteristically sour taste caused by lactic acid bacteria. This variant is made using one of two species of bacteria—either Streptococcus lactis or ...


7

The baking soda and acid from the dried buttermilk should not react in any significant amount until you hydrate the mixture, so it should work. Remember, baking powder is acid and sodium bicarbonate in the same can, and there is little except acid and reactant; your mix will have a lot of buffer ingredients as well. I would not add the oil to the dry mix ...


7

Soy milk is bitter. Enzymes in the beans (lipoxygenase) combine with fats in the presence of water to produce what is usually described as a "beany flavor"; bitter and grassy. The solution to this problem, although not done in many traditional soy milk preparations, is to cook the soy milk long enough to destroy the enzyme. Many, but not all, soy milk ...


7

Know that the traditional Frank's Buffalo Wings Sauce is just Frank's RedHot and melted butter. I'd definitely start there, and tweak with the substitution. The old standard is 1/2 cup (118ml) Frank's RedHot to 1/3 cup (79ml) melted butter. Vinegar is a distinct possibility, to me neither buttermilk nor ketchup make sense. You might find this recipe for ...


6

Technically, this is "buttermilk" - the milk left over from churning butter. Of course, this is sweet buttermilk, so it won't really work for most recipes calling for buttermilk (they assume the cultured version, which is acidic, and has that purpose in recipes). For sweet buttermilk, you can just drink it. You can use it in cooking, much like milk - ...


6

No, creme fraiche needs specific cultures, which are not yogurt cultures, and lower fermentation temperature. If you use yogurt with Lactobacilicus Bulgaricus to innoculate your cream, and a standard yogurt process, you will get smetana (schmand). This is a dairy product with the same fat content as creme fraiche, but a different, sharper, flavor profile. ...


5

No, it will not react. There is a bit of theory behind it. The reaction in batter is a reaction between a base and an acid. For this type of reaction, you need ions swimming freely in water. In dried substances, your ions are stuck to other ions to form molecules, or ion gitters, depending on the substance. They cannot react with anything, just like a pen ...


5

While Yogurt and milk are not traditional buttermilk, modern buttermilk is very similar to yogurt. Traditional buttermilk is actually the liquid you have left over after you've made butter, while modern buttermilk is a cultured product. Generally, in baking, buttermilk is used for its acidity and protein content. If you want a viable substitute, milk and ...


5

This is normal. The batter is not bad and is a chemical reaction. Just stir it up. I have been eating pancakes for years and always refrigerate the extra batter. Its good for a couple of days.


5

Pre-filling: Filled: Sliced: (sorry for poor quality, most of pie was eaten before I got this) So... worked okay. The internal wall did a good job keeping the fillings separated, but did seem to cause the slice to want to split down the middle. In the future, I'd just do the shoofly custard on the bottom, pull it out and completely cool it, then do the ...


5

It sounds like what you're getting is "cultured buttermilk", which as you noted, is not the leftover liquid from having made butter, but is basically runny yogurt. I'm not familiar with Irish buttermilk, but it sounds like it's the older sense of the term "buttermilk". (ie, the milk leftover from making butter)


4

The only time I ever throw buttermilk out is if it has mold in it. I keep it in the back top shelf of the fridge and it does fine. I have some right now with an expiry date of Dec 2012. Whenever I'm making a choc cake or cornbread I open it and if it has no green, Shake it up to incorporate and go ahead and use it. I try to buy the kind in a plastic ...


4

You'll be fine doing a straight substitution. Well, maybe I shouldn't be so definitive since these are powders we're talking about and it's not quite the same thing, but I've substituted buttermilk for whole milk in bread recipes plenty of times. The only thing that changed for me was the rising time. When I use buttermilk in my sandwich bread, it needs ...


3

To substitute for buttermilk, mix one cup of regular milk with 1 tablespoon of white vinegar or lemon juice. Stir; let the mixture stand for approximately five minutes. Modify proportions appropriately for more or less "buttermilk substitute." I have used this replacement and it works perfectly.


3

I'll attempt to clarify a few issues that have come up in previous answers and comments: I can think of three primary functions for buttermilk in most recipes: flavor a texture agent (to get a certain thickness or viscosity) leavening (when combined with other chemical agents) The best substitute will depend on which of these factors is/are necessary ...


3

Historically, milk was accumulated in the churn until there was enough to be worth making butter. The milk would, of course, ferment. Both the butter and the watery buttermilk took the sour, fermented flavor. Modern buttermilk is different. It is low fat milk that has been cultured and fermented. It is thicker and creamier but has a similar soured flavor. (...


3

Rich, slightly acidic buttermilk makes a good marinade for deep fried chicken for a couple of reasons: The acidity and milk fats help to break down the outer skin of the chicken so it gets crispier as it fries. It adheres to the chicken and helps the flour coating stick to it. There is a discussion here that goes through all that and recommends a minimum ...


2

A vegan alternative that can work for some recipes is to add lemon juice to almond milk. This worked very good for me to make soda bread, in which the acidic quality of buttermilk reacts with baking soda, making the bread rise. The acidity of lemon juice can achieve the same thing. For a recipe calling for 1 cup of buttermilk: Use 1 tablespoon of freshly-...


2

I freeze left over buttermilk in ice cube trays. When frozen, I put the cubes in a plastic bag to be kept in the freezer & use as needed.


2

Buttermilk never expires. Ten days after the expiration date, just boil it for a few minutes and let it settle for a while. It makes a great dry yogurt in the form of cookies. They last for years.


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