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36

There is a kraut cutter, a wooden board about 2 ft long with a diagonal blade. We used all the time when I was a child. We laid it on a large pot. You cut heads of cabbage in half and push it over the blade flat side down. Try google or an old fashioned hard ware.


16

Another way to say this is to quarter the cabbage. The goal is to make "wedges" (triangles, when viewed from above) that are smaller than an entire head of cabbage (easier to cook and fit in your slow cooker) but still relatively intact. To wedge a cabbage, slice it in half, and then slice the halves into either 2 or 4 pieces (depending on how large a wedge ...


16

You can be more efficient with a knife than any sort of kitchen aid attachment, which will require lots of prep, and slow going. A better bet for home use would be the shredder on a food processor. However, even then, while it will make quick work of shredding, you will have to cut the cabbage into smaller portions to fit into the processor...and, of ...


15

Well, having grown up near "the" Sauerkraut region in Germany - I'd say don't. Honstly, I hadn't ever thought about why until today (can't have been only lazyness that my ancestors left the kraut in peace until done.), but: Why making really sure to create a water-seal when you are breaking it with stirring? The kraut is supposed to ferment under the ...


13

To answer your specific scenario, kimchi has myriad variations using any number of vegetables, from perilla leaves to Korean radishes to napa cabbage. There are forms of kimchi that involve no chilies (white kimchi), some involve a lot of water and bear little resemblance to the typical napa cabbage one (mul kimchi). The main constraints for Korean-ness of ...


13

2% (20g per 1000g) would be my default recommendation based on sources local to me, but with care less salt may work if sanitation is extremely good (to minimize introduction of undesirable bacteria which the salt helps to supress.) On the high end, I can say that 4% seems to slow things down, but work, and 8% seems to be simply too much. The pictured jars ...


10

When you can foods, even in a mass production setting, you're pouring near boiling contents into the cans. So heating it in your soup is no different than having used those tomatoes in the soup. If it wasn't food safe it wouldn't be used for canning. It would do no more harm to eat the soup than it would be to eat the tomatoes out of that can. Addition: ...


10

There is a transition in color between the outer cabbage leaves and the inner ones. A few on the outside are green, but they become significantly paler as you move towards the inside of the cabbage (see cross-section at right below). Also, the outermost leaves may be removed and discarded before the cabbage is processed (they're most likely to have dirt, ...


10

Haha, we were doing that every fall in my childhood in Siberia. We used an enamelled bucket and "sechka" https://65.img.avito.st/640x480/4526427565.jpg Splice a head of cabbage in big pieces with a knife, put them into the bucket until it is full, then smash it all with sechka. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LJ1HR9o4JGc - that guy is using another kind of ...


9

Per NC State's Extension's article on pickles and sauerkraut (some emphasis added): Pickles or sauerkraut mold during fermentation. Answer: Unsafe—microorganisms are growing improperly. Possible reasons Fermentation temperature was above 75°F. Too much salt was used, not allowing adequate lactic acid production. The ...


9

Anthocyanins are antioxidants that are a very common water based pigment in plants. There are over 500 varieties that have been isolated from plants which are are responsible for many blue, red, and purple pigments in flowers and fruit. It is thought that the colors serve to attract pollinators to flowers and camouflage leaves from herbivores. They are the ...


9

It appears to be curly endive which is a lettuce. It is crisp and has a bitter flavor. Dole Know Your Lettuce


8

Exposing the sauerkraut to air is undesirable: we want an oxygen-free environment for the bacteria to do their work, and air exposure also brings increased (though small) likelihood of surface contamination (by mold for example). I don't have a reference but I'm pretty sure that historically opening a crock to stir was not a thing. And regarding your ...


8

Yes, you can use any cabbage you like. You can also make kimchi with cucumbers...bean sprouts....really, many vegetables. It's really just fermenting/pickling.


7

The goal of the boiling step is to make it easy to remove the leaves. Removing whole individual cabbage leaves on a raw head of cabbage is tricky; they tend to tear. If you want to put forth the effort, it should be just fine. They're cooked just long enough to soften them and make it possible to wrap them around the filling. I will happen much faster ...


5

Sounds like a basic Asian Cabbage Slaw. Sometimes the dressing is made with rice vinegar, lemon juice maybe a little sesame oil to make a vinaigrette. I'm sure the dressing is dependent on the restaurant. where did you get it?


5

Correct me if I'm wrong, but to my eye it looks like there is a tiny gap between the two containers so the surface of the fermenting liquid is slightly exposed to air. Is that correct? If so, you have an "open crock" apparatus where the surface is exposed to air. While "open crock" is a very traditional method (and Alton Brown seems unconcerned), as I ...


5

In brief, your question has no possible general answer for the kind of scenario you posit (where you add a certain amount of salt to a certain volume of food) or even a scenario where you add a brine of concentration X to a certain amount of food. Most vegetable (and animal) sources for food contain significant amounts of water, and some of that water will ...


5

For those interested I googled images of the dishes Cindy mentioned and tried to match the description. This is what I found: First Celery, Second Baby Cabbage.


4

With much searching, I'm pretty sure that I found the two appetizers. They are both cold dish. The names are Mountain Celery in Hot and Sour Sauce and Baby Cabbage in Sauce Thanks to anyone who spent time looking. These are really great appetizers. Update: We made both recipes last evening. Both are absolutely delicious and the flavors I remember. We ...


4

Some of the butter ends up on your food. Most people will think the flavor is improved if there's a tiny bit of salt and a tiny bit of butter flavor. We like fat, we like salt, and we like the actual butter flavor, though it's more subtle. In case you were wondering why the butter ends up on the food... The oil melts into the water boiling on the bottom. It'...


4

I checked a few German Sources1 and found a range between 7.5g salt per kg cabbage2 and 20g salt per kg cabbage3. So anywhere between one and a generous two teaspoons per kilogram (two pounds) should be fine. But what exactly is the salt doing in your cabbage/sauerkraut? Well, in theory you could leave it out. The bacteria and yeasts necessary for the ...


4

You can try using a good long sharp knife and a large wooden cutting board like Michael mentioned but it can be slow if you're inexperienced. Other cutting boards will dull your knife quickly which is why I mentioned a wooden one. The only other way I know is to use a mandoline. You'd have to first cut the cabbage small enough to use but I know for myself,...


4

Mandolines can work, but there's a problem -- cabbages are round, so the leaves aren't flat. This makes it more difficult to cut everything in only one plane, such as would happen with a mandoline or shreading disk on a food processor. Although people have said 'use a long sharp knife' and similar, they haven't mentioned the technique: Remove any outer, ...


4

Apparently, it has been done. According to this website, the flavor will be strong compared to sauerkraut: The flavor is strong; hard to describe — not just simply more acidic but strong, and the texture is a little tough... I also find that kale ferments accentuate the salty flavor, no matter how carefully I salt and I have no idea why. Mirror this with ...


4

Do you have a food processor? Most food processors come with interchangeable blades including a blade for shredding. Put the shredder blade in, lock on the lid, cut the cabbage into wedges that will fit in the feed tube, power on, and feed in the cabbage. You may have to empty the work bowl a couple times, depending on how much cabbage, but it's the fastest ...


3

Penn State Extension recommends: Cover with a plate weighted down with jars filled with water or cover with a large food grade plastic bag filled with salt water (6 tablespoons salt per gallon of water.)


3

I made it without nappa. This is my recipe which turned out pretty good!! Kimchi cabbage: Cabbage, salt, water 1. Rinse cabbage 2.Cut into strips 3.Rise again and put salt 4.Store in cool area. Wait 5-8hours Sauce: Celery, onion, garlic powder, garlic paste, ginger powder, chili powder, Hoi sin sauce Soy sauce, worchesteshire, stir fry sauce,sugar. 1.Chop ...


3

Ornamental cabbage is often actually a kale. See this link with pictures very similar to yours: http://www.arhomeandgarden.org/plantoftheweek/articles/ornamental_kale.htm Kale is edible and nutritious but it is tough and very strongly flavored compared to cabbage. Kale recipes usually involve long braises in flavorful liquid to break down the toughness. ...


3

Are you trying to make Sauerkraut? Either way for the pink colour you have a non-desirable bacteria growing. While most Sauerkraut has some of this, it is not always safe to eat. Time to throw it away? If you salt cabbage, you need to ensure not too much salt is used (1% to 2% max), and make sure it is packed down very firmly, so only anaerobic bacteria ...


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