7

File powder is mostly used for thickening gumbo, and there are two schools of thought on that (armed with shotguns and rifles, so trifle with them at your peril): file gumbo and okra gumbo. A file gumbo is thickened with file (typically added by the diner at before eating the gumbo), as mentioned. An okra gumbo is thickened with... well.. okra. It is ...


5

Gumbo is a stew/soup, etouffee involves a roux to make it more of a sauce served over rice as a vehicle, and jambalaya is a one-pot meal with rice as an integral part of the dish--sort of like a cajun paella. All three tend to have shellfish where as gumbo and jambalaya tend to also have sausage (etouffee usually doesn't have sausage that I've seen).


5

I cook gumbo all the time. I usually cook large gumbo for parties.. 30 quarts or greater at a time. I can tell you from experience exactly what is happening... And one of the answers above is right on. Your roux is not mixing due to a temperature issue. I ALWAYS use 2 pots when making a gumbo... No matter what kind of gumbo it is. I use a cast iron ...


2

I've had my roux separate on more that one occasion and the cause I found was in the technique of adding cold stock to a hot roux, you have to temper your roux with the colder stock a little at a time, or you will end up shocking the oil and flour and the roux will separate from the stock liquid. I found the remedy to this; Oh shet moment on a Cajun cooking ...


2

I usually have this same problem when I make a really big batch of gumbo. I've tried all of the usual stuff: adding cold stock to hot roux, hot stock to cold roux, doing an extra vigorous boil. None of it worked. I've come to believe the adding cold to hot trick is old kitchen lore that has no scientific foundation. To settle this, I read some academic ...


2

For thickening,flour or corn starch would be the route I would go. And for (feelay) file substitute flavoring, I use root beer where water is called for. Hard to tell the difference if you even can.


1

The origin of the word ‘gumbo’ is okra. I don’t remember the whole story, but Gumbo IS okra soup. Jambalaya is a rice dish. Creole is a tomato based dish. I think the most important thing is that these dishes are rustic and can have almost ANYTHING in them from expensive cuts of protein to straight up vegetables. All are spicy but not necessarily ‘hot’.


1

Although I am not from Louisiana, I have made gumbo dozens of time and live in the New Orleans area, I had my roux separate twice. Tonight was the second time. I found a fix on another web page. I used Xanthan gum which is an emulsifier. It bonded the roux to the stock. However I used too much and now my gumbo is extra thick. Make a slurry with it first ...


1

Both Cajun and Creole cuisines originate from French/European influence but there's a specific difference between them - Cajun is French 'provincial' cuisine adapted by local workers for and with local ingredients. Creole is French 'aristocratic' cuisine as practised in the better off households of the south and mimicking the influences of higher quality ...


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