Hot answers tagged

16

Is the corn still in the husk ? Do you have aluminium foil ? Keep the corn in the husk and roast until cooked; it's better to remove some of the leaves and dip them in water to add some moisture to the corn before putting on the grill. If you have aluminium foil, you can either keep the corn as is and wrap in foil, or remove the husk and wrap in foil and put ...


16

Even husked corn can be nicely roasted on an open grill. Use gentle heat, turning frequently until the kernels are golden. Some kernels will be darker, even charred a bit, but I find that enjoyable.


13

The interior of modern cans are a heat resistant plastic (remember they pressure cook the cans at the factory), and will be fine for heating liquid things Just don't try using it to fry stuff!


8

Bisquick is a dry product that contains partially hydrogenated soybean and/or cottonseed oil and leavening. You can get recipe ideas from their website. With the Bisquick, some powdered eggs and powdered milk, you could create all kinds of fun mixes for camping.


4

The Dinty Moore recipe adds water to thin the stew so the dumplings will boil properly. Otherwise it will be difficult to get your dumplings to cook evenly as they won't sink into the thick stew and the stew won't have enough convection around them. I would follow the Dinty Moore recipe including the dilution. Pillsbury calls for 25-30 minutes but that is ...


4

I just take a little vegetable oil in a small Nalgene bottle that seals tight. For a week with 9 people I wouldn't even use up 200ml, and I presume you're doing a shorter trip with less people, so the weight is not an issue. You can then add it to what you're cooking, use it to fry things, etc. (I also take cornmeal to fry pizza or English muffins.) Using ...


4

So it's been a while since I asked this, and I've done a fair bit of camping and cake making since then, so I thought I'd share my experiences. I based most of my techniques on the excellent answer Joe posted, but have some additional details to add. The main issue with making cakes on the fire is burning the cake. Usually this is on the bottom, but can ...


4

As you will have the freshest fish possible and only limited equipment and ingredients in your camp, why not choose a preparation that is in its simplicity highlighting the fish, needs almost no equipment and creates no trash: Plank cooking, also known as Loimulohi. The cleaned fish, filleted or butterflied, is nailed on a wooden plank, either with ...


4

Olive oil will degrade over time, but that is measured in months and years if stored out of the light, and in cool conditions. If you leave EVOO (extra virgin olive oil) in a glass container in sunlight, it will start to loose some of it's amazing flavour, astringency, and smell, but again this will take many days to be even slightly noticeable. It will ...


4

From what I understand, the usual way to campfire-cook an egg (without pots'n'pans, I mean) is to pierce a little hole in it on one end, I think on the large end so the bubble of air leaks out before any egg does, and then partially bury it right next to the campfire so it bakes slowly-ish. I've heard of burying in earth or in ashes, depending on one's ...


4

Typically dehydrated foods of this sort are freeze-dried rather than dehydrated by heating. This is a process of sublimation of the water out of the food in a controlled manner under very low temperature conditions. This is generally not practical at home due to the nature of the equipment needed. However, it seems that the instant rice is dehydrated in ...


4

I can’t give you numbers as I haven’t experimented with it yet (but am very inspired to do so by your post), but assuming that you will be heating water for a morning coffee or so, have you considered putting the lentils into a smallish thermos container, topping them up with boiling water and letting them soak / slow cook during the day? Adding your ...


3

Are you truly wedded to those particular ingredients? If you're not, I'd consider replacing the dumplings with a shelf-stable gnocchi: Boil a bit more water than you'd need for thinning out the stew (maybe 2x as much, depending on how many dumplings you're cooking). Cook the gnocchi in the water Add the beef stew Heat through If the stew's a little too ...


3

You can indeed dehydrate cooked rice. It is a lack of water activity that is one factor which increases the safety of foods, so no problem there. Rice is no more problematic than other foods. As you probably know, dehydrated foods are a staple for camping and backpacking. So, cook your rice at home, then place in a food dehydrator. Once on the trail, a 5 ...


3

You can consider using lard, shortening, or ghee. They are not dry, but they are more easy to store and carry and melt less easily than butter. In case fat content is a concern, here is a quick list: Vegetable oils have about 15 gms of saturated fat per 100gms of oil. Vegetable shortening has about 20 gms of saturated fat per 100gms of shortening. Lard ...


3

We camp at the beach on a regular basis during the warmer months (which is most of the year down here in South Texas!!), and we've found that along with freezing water bottles and proper layering, we can get an extra day or 2 out of our cooler by digging a well in the sand to put the cooler in. The sand acts as a great insulator against the heat, plus the ...


2

I get two coolers one smaller than the other. The smaller one is for cans of soda or a gallon of milk and two liter bottles. Using two litre bottles as ice containers is a good idea as whe the ice melts it will not get all over your food. If you have any bubble wrap stuff it in the top of the cooler to take up dead air space. Bubble wrap or sealed air ...


2

Protein of any sort tends to spoil somewhat quickly when it contains water. I suggest you bring icepacks and eat any meat or meat substitutes on your first night if you want to bring them at all. For the rest of the trip, perhaps you could get your protein from dry beans you soak at the camp, meat jerky, nuts and seeds in sufficient quantity, or fish you ...


2

An alternative exists: simply buying ready-made instant yerba mate. It looks like this: As you can probably see, it's a fine powder, a teaspoon's worth is about equivalent to a fresh gourd fill - so, it's quite efficient for when you're on the go. Do note that: the powder is indeed fine and very sticky, so you have to take care when preparing your brew (e....


2

there is a powdered cocoa butter product called mycryo. it's intended for frying, but it might work for your intended purposes. http://www.cacao-barry.com/usen/2516


2

Steel cans might release trace amounts of chromium and nickel when heated but aluminum leaches much more easily, according to Scientific American Magazine. Aluminum is linked to significant health problems, including disorders of the nervous system. The linings that coat most cans of either type may contain BPA, a chemical linked to cancer and reproductive ...


2

Powdered eggs are available for purchase. Yes, they can be used for baking. Due to the their advantages, they are often advertised for camping or long-term storage use. You can even purchase the powdered whites and powdered yolks separately. However, there are many applications they are not good for (fried eggs, anyone?). There are a number of tutorials ...


2

Two likely possibilities: The potatoes had too much foil surface exposed and not enough in contact with hot coals, and as a result were just not getting hot enough. Maybe it was a colder night (were you hiking at altitude?) maybe the coals had a lot of insulating ash, maybe the coals were already too cool (350F is not particularly hot for coals). This is ...


1

I'm skeptical about whether adding/omiting salt makes a difference, but it may. Also experiment with adding a little baking soda; pH affects cooking time (and the final consistency), and 'neutral' isn't the limit of the usable range. I haven't found any really reputable sources on my own, but this excellent answer discusses the role of baking soda in ...


1

Cooking then in unsalted water Pressure cooking - saves 50%-60% of time Soaking them for 2-3 hours and cooking Generally, I find red split lentils are the easiest ones to cook and they cook in a very short time than any lentils. Yellow split peas take longer to cook.


1

If you are driving to your campsite or canoeing to it then I would suggest a cast iron frying pan because you can set it directly on the coals and cook. Simple pan-fried trout with a bit of salt and pepper is extremely easy and tasty too. If you have to haul all your equipment then your foil cooking is a great idea, you can also weave your (flat) fish ...


1

I don't add any water to Dinty Moore Stew. Just make Egg Noodles in salted water, drain, put back in the pot. I then add 1-2 tlbs extra virgin olive oil to coat the noodles, but it's not needed. Open the can of the Dinty Moore and add it to the noodles. Have the heat on medium low and warm everything up. That's it! Delish!! You can add 1/4 cup dry white ...


1

There is a thing called powdered shortening or you can get powdered butter. They are just add water products that you can put in a recipe like that and it will work fine.


1

Notes from Elizabethan England suggests wrapping the loaf in a cabbage leaf! Will try it along with heat on the lid. Don't know if it will flavour it?


1

Okay the best way to melt smores on campfire is simple. Years ago we would make campfire pies over the hot coals well this works great. place aluminum foil on inside so does not mess up your iron, lay graham crackers and choc precook your marshmallow and place on choc close up place back in coals for just a few min to warm up choc and you have best smores ...


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