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32

Almost exactly what you describe can be done, it’s shown in this video. The sugar isn’t hot blown, it’s isomalt, a lower-calorie sugar substitute used in lower calorie candies and by foodies because it is formable into interesting shapes, like your sphere. It's a sugar alcohol, derived from sugar, and is considered "natural" (see What does "natural&...


30

Thank you, all of you, who contributed by answers or comments to the thinking that leads now to this answer. I listened to all of you, and it worked. I can't describe how tickled I am. Your suggestions opened my mind to thinking that this could still "work" even if it didn't quite go as I had hoped. As it turned out, the end product exceeded my hopes. This ...


24

It's not an old wives tale; it's actually true to a point. I can't say it better than Exploratorium, Science of Cooking Can weather affect candy making? Oddly enough, it can. Cooking candy syrup to the desired temperature means achieving a certain ratio of sugar to moisture in the candy. On a humid day, once the candy has cooled to the point where it is no ...


21

The simple approach is to skip the wire rack and place the dipped confections on parchment paper, waxed paper or a silicone mat. (Some use plastic wrap or aluminum foil, but this may stick as well. Oiling helps.) After cooling, they should come off easily. However, there’s a chance of them developing “feet” when the runoff pools on the parchment, especially ...


14

Pirouette cookies (here by Pepperidge Farm) are rolled wafer cookies. The inside is stuffed with chocolate, chocolate hazelnut or vanilla. Here's a recipe that includes a picture using them in a manner similar to what you're asking. You could follow the recipe, but tweak it to look more like a straw and with colors and flavors that suit your purpose.


13

Stick candy would be an option. They even usually offer it in many flavors including root beer or sassafras. Obviously, the root beer flavored ones are sort of boring looking but the other flavors come in many beautiful color combos. They may be slightly wider than what you want but they're pretty close. They're similar to the wider straws for shakes.


13

I have seen smoke presented under glass domes. Clearly the smoke wasn't put in there while making the glass. source: http://www.weekendnotes.com/onyx-dessert-lounge/ Probably the steps are: Make a bunch of spheres or near-spheres (with openings at the bottom) out of sugar and let them cool plate the rest of the dish - some sort of soft stuff to support ...


11

Pocky is probably about the right diameter, but doesn't have that spiral of color that would really look like a straw. Candy Sticks look right, but the available flavors might not be a great match for your root beer cupcakes.


11

Freeze them. After they are frozen, put them in the food processor and you should no longer have the issue of them sticking to the blades. As Dougal mentions below, you can also freeze the blade to help keep the temp down.


11

One thing you can put them on is teflon cooking liner (example). Chocolate doesn't dry by evaporation but but cooling, so you don't need airflow underneath. You can put this on top of a cooling rack or any flat surface. It's very non-stick, but because it's flexible if any chocolates do stick you can peel the sheet of the chocolate rather than the other way ...


10

Hard candy (I think called boiled candy in England), such as lollipops or star mints is essentially pure sugar, with some color and flavor added. This type of candy will last essentially forever, if kept absolutely dry. There may be some degradation to the color or flavorings after six months or so, but the candy itself will last indefinitely. If moisture ...


10

Looks like it takes about 600psi CO2 to treat the liquid candy. Patent search should reveal more detail: US patent 3012893 Patent links are notorious for decaying over a short time frame. If the second link is dead go http://www.uspto.gov/patents-application-process/search-patents or here to find find out how the inventors did it. Patents before 1976, are ...


10

There are recipes on the internet for making home made pop rocks. Some of them call for using baking soda plus an acid, so that you generate carbon dioxide in the syrup, rather than injecting it as a pressurized gas. I would assume that you could also use baking powder if you can't find powdered acids.


9

This is actually (partially) true. It is more correct for fudge, not so much for candy overall. The texture of fudge and fondant depends a lot on the water contents where a 1% difference will matter and it will absorb moisture from the air during the cooling and beating period. So a high humidity will result in a runny fudge. Source: "On Food and Cooking", ...


9

Aluminum foil is not non-stick, except for those specially silicone or otherwise coated foils that are explicitly marketed as such. (And which are probably even more of an environmental nightmare than regular foil, but I digress.) If you see aluminum foil used in a candy making context, you will notice that they recommend greasing or oiling the foil before ...


8

I noticed that you're stirring constantly. Generally with candy you want to stir as little as possible, since it causes sugar crystals to form in the syrup. In addition to making the candy grainier, they reduce the overall lifespan- even after the candy has cooled the (larger) crystals will continue to grow, causing the candy to slowly revert back into ...


8

I've imported a dragon beard candy product from Hong Kong in the increasingly-distant past. The company I worked with used a maltose-based solution that had been boiled (wheat germ sugar). They'd typically heat the puck in a microwave or hot water bath before shaping the dragon beard candy so that it would be soft enough to work, but still have the tensile ...


8

I think classic hard candy would be difficult if not impossible to make with fruit juice because it combines the fruit sugars (fructose) with a lot of other things, and hard candy is normally made by heating sucrose (table sugar, which is 50% fructose, 50% glucose) to the hard-crack stage (300-310F) to the point where it is essentially 99% sugar. As the ...


8

After researching this, I think there are a few possibly options you could try (though I haven't personally tried any of them, they seem worth experimenting with). Isomalt Apparently isomalt can be used in place of sugar in most cotton candy machines - though it should be ground and sifted so it doesn't damage your machine. Isomalt may be a better starting ...


7

Applied Science, a YouTube channel, had a video about making carbonated candy a la Pop Rocks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsSwvmNEr0Q Here's a broad outline: Craft a mixing chamber that can hold 600 psi (40 bar), has an inlet for CO2, and a rotary pressure seal with a mixing/whisk attachment. Make a hard candy (280 °F/137 °C) on the stove Preheat the ...


7

I think user23614's comment is correct. They're ragged comfits, sugar coated seeds or spices. These two paintings by the German painter Georg Flegel, have similar objects depicted, and are described by two different sources (Sugar-Plums and Comfits, Sugar Plums Demystified) as being ragged comfits: They're apparently not very common these days, surviving ...


7

If I had to guess I would say your filling is not cold enough when you dip it so it starts to melt and pockets of air form when it comes into contact with the warm chocolate, which then doesn't cover the egg properly, causing filling to leak when it warms up a bit. Try putting the fillings in the freezer for a bit (30 minutes to an hour) after you've shaped ...


6

I have been struggling with this for a while now, and I have finally made a batch that is JUST like store bought! It is a little more complicated and will require you to heat the sugar to 240 F (soft-ball stage) 1st part 1 Cup Sugar 3 Tbsp Water 3/4 Cup Corn Syrup 2nd part 1/2 cup water 7 packets (46 grams) Gelatin (I used knox) 14 grams fruit pectin 3rd ...


6

It's not a question of "how long" as much as it's a question of "how hot." Sugar reaches the so-called hard ball stage somewhere between 250 and 265 degrees F. How long it will take your sugar to reach that temperature depends on a number of variables including the power of your cooking range and the type of vessel the sugar is being cooked in. Use either a ...


6

Candymaking is extremely sensitive to temperature. If the mixture heats higher than the point that produces the desired texture, you're basically out of luck. That makes it very critical that you reach and not exceed your target temperature. This is particularly difficult when making candy because much of it starts as a sugar-and-water syrup. Water has ...


6

If you're willing to add a soft texture, you can make a soft-ball caramel and knead the salt into that. Then freeze the 'dough' and shatter it with a chef's hammer. If you dip that in the dry caramel, it should buffer the salt and keep it from dissolving before your shell hardens. You can also do this with fondant or ganache or the like, if you're looking ...


6

Tempering is a process used to give solid chocolate a uniform appearance and texture, as well as to insure that those qualities are shelf-stable. Most commercially available chocolate is already tempered to some degree so that it has a pleasing appearance and texture for customers to enjoy right out of the box/bag. Tempering is required when the final ...


6

A characteristic of untempered chocolate is that it melts more easily. That's generally considered bad--if you pick it up in your hand, your hand gets sticky and the surface of the chocolate gets marred. But it also means that you get stronger flavor more quickly when you put it in your mouth. If you are designing a confection where that is the intent, ...


6

I don't think you physically can achieve the same results with a sous vide machine. Typically, those are designed to hold a water bath at a specific (relatively low) temperature. You can't hold water above its boiling point in an open container, because it's, well, boiling and will eventually evaporate. (You could do this in a sealed container, which is the ...


6

I was considering rolling chocolate or fondant and lo and behold some googling turned up these fondant straws made for use atop cupcakes, along with instructions on how to make them: https://bakearama.wordpress.com/2014/05/09/pink-lemonade-cupcakes/ The short version: Twist together "snakes" of red and white fondant to make straws. They will harden as ...


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