Hot answers tagged

62

What about a piping bag? Fill the bag with a spatula, pipe into the bottle.


38

Physics stops you from heating up liquids that consist of mostly water to temperatures above (roughly) 100 C. The temperature of your heating element can be set higher, but neither the temperature of the water bath nor the liquid in your jars can go higher than the boiling point where water changes from liquid to vapor - which is 100 C at normal pressure ...


33

Exposure to germs is the problem, once you open these they are exposed and the clock starts. If you vacuum seal you are vacuum sealing the germs in with the food, and not taking steps to kill the pathogens. Pouring into a sterilized container again just puts contaminated food into an uncontaminated container. The only way to make them shelf stable again ...


26

The short answer is: No. The more elaborate answer is that certain bacteria are anaerobic and food needs to be heat treated to ensure it can be safely stored. Especial mention: Clostridium botulinum which leaves deadly toxins. The tealight inside the jar will not produce the heat needed for pasteurization.


24

The preserving effect of canning is based on removing all bacteria and fungi (normally present at least to some extent even in perfectly safe food) by a combination of heat and pressure over a certain time preventing new bacteria or fungi from reaching the food by sealing the containers avoiding oxidation by sealing the cans sometimes supporting this by ...


24

As you state, you have not followed any canning procedures, so you don't get any more storage time than the standard recommendation. Glass vs plastic doesn't matter. So, I would just recommend freezing. Tomatoes, and tomato based sauces for that matter, freeze nicely. If you use freezer, zip-style bags, you can freeze them flat. They will then thaw ...


23

All tinned foods which are not dry (like flour or coffee grounds) have been sufficiently cooked and are safe to eat directly after opening. Once opened, leftover contents should be treated like any perishable food. Of course, some canned foods should be heated before serving, but that's a culinary consideration rather than a safety concern.


20

Assuming the can was canned properly and has not been damaged, the contents are effectively sterile, because the food is boiled in the can after it's sealed. There might be some degradation in texture and taste, but in terms of food safety, they are effectively safe. Note that the date on your tin is given as Best Before, not Use By. That generally means it'...


20

Canned foods are by their very nature cooked once they're in the can. That's how they keep so well. It is possible to grill canned meat if you dry it first, and it may benefit from a little browning for best flavour (assuming this wasn't done before canning).


20

These are two different ways to preserve food. The canned salmon was boiled and then sealed into a can while it was still boiling sealed into a can and boiled under a specified combination of time and temperature that has been empirically proven to kill enough bacteria. All the bacteria in the can are dead, and no more can get in, so it's sterile and won't ...


19

As people have mentioned, canned meats are cooked as part of the canning process, so it’s safe to eat as is... but it’s not always ideal to do so. In many ways, it’s like a chicken hot dog right out of the package. It might be safe to eat, but it’s much better if you cook it. I would recommend slicing it up, and then browning the slices. This helps to ...


17

Summary: It's impossible to give a good statistical answer to this question, since historically botulism was associated with only certain foods, and diagnosis was mostly based on symptoms occurring after consumption of those foods. Thus, old statistics include a small subset of actual cases. Actual medical testing for botulism in an ambiguous case was not ...


16

No, you should not need to boil your canned food. Most canned foods have already been heated to boiling — or higher — temperatures to kill all microbes as part of the canning process. Seafood is heated to temperatures even higher than boiling and canned under pressure. Canned food is, by definition, sterilized and hermetically sealed so unless you believe ...


16

If you just damaged previously unharmed cans and they don’t show signs of leakage, the cans should be perfectly safe, even if you store them at room temperature. The US Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service writes: If a can containing food has a small dent, but is otherwise in good shape, the food should be safe to eat. Discard ...


15

Short answer: Yes, throw it away. Long answer: Bubbling, fizzing, pressure etc. indicates some kind of microbiological activity that is unwanted for properly canned food - canning should eliminate these organisms. Any behaviour like the one you described indicates that something went wrong, so you can not assume the contents of the jar or can to be safe.


15

You should sterilize your jars and lids before every use. The dust that gets on them between uses and even in the box is enough to warrant sterilizing. It doesn't take long. Running them through a cycle in the dishwasher with a steam or sterilization step is enough. I boil the lids in a small sauce pan. Edit Debbie M's comment below made me think that ...


14

That passage is suggesting an entire canning/processing method, one that may not be safe. It will generally work to create a seal, as they say, but it may not fully sterilize the contents and the seal will not be as likely to hold. I would not follow their instructions, and instead process your chutney according to a trusted canning recipe you find elsewhere....


13

Edited: Concerns were expressed about such items being suited for food use. I've added comments in the text on "Food Grade" items plus a note at the end. How can I get a very thick or viscous paste (e.g. caramel, ganache, thick mayonnaise) into small-necked squeeze bottles without heating it up? Consider using a "grease gun" as used by mechanics. These ...


13

From Grab Grocery: Precooked beef luncheon meat with the addition of chicken essence in 340g preserved cans. Robert beef luncheon meat is a wholesome meal cooked and slaughtered as per halal dietary laws and is suitable perfectly for people who are tolerant of meat products. So the meat is safe to eat without needing to be cooked by the customer. The link ...


12

Obviously, every manufacturer is going to have their own proprietary methods. However, canned goods are often made by combining ingredients (possibly partially cooked) directly into the cans, and then pressure cooking them in the can as part of the canning process. So, for example, the broth, some celery, and some carrots might be added to the open can in ...


12

Canned salmon is sterilized. Sterilization uses heat to render a product safe. Cured hams are preserved with salt, and nitrites in some cases. Some hams are also cooked. Furthermore, some fish is salted and dried for curing purposes. Salt and drying greatly reduce water activity to render a product safe. Two different processes, both create a safe product.


12

The important part of the system are the lids. The ideal lids are the Mason-type (no matter which company produced them), with a flat top and a separate side piece with thread. Another type that works is the older Weck style jar, which consists of a glass jar with glass lid, plus rubber steal and metal clamps, no threads. This system is as safe as the ...


11

Those are the flavorings. Just like dill pickles have dill in them, those are what give the flavor profile that people expect from bread & butter pickles.


11

This is totally not a problem. This style of lemon preservation relies on fermentation. The salt is not intended to halt all fermentation- it just restricts it to the tasty kind. Fermented pickles are a common and traditional way to preserve food because the salt and acid and thriving tasty bacteria make a very inhospitable environment for bad bugs. The ...


11

If you put hot (or even warm) sauce in a jar, seal it, and place the jar into the fridge, as it cools, it (as well as the air in the jar) will contract. The larger the temperature change, the greater the vacuum that will be created. Most likely, what you are seeing is warm sauce cooling and creating enough vacuum to suck in that button on the lid. If that'...


11

Anyone here who gives you an estimate beyond what a typical (non-canned) refrigerated sauce would last is just going to be speculating. The thing about canning recipes from reputable sources is that they are tested scientifically. They often run hundreds of trials with testers for a particular recipe, then test each for bacterial growth, etc., before ...


11

There are thick food grade syringes being made for that kind of application.. https://www.amazon.com/Syringes/dp/B07C71C1LH/ The plunger comes out at the back easily, so you can pour your sauce into the syringe, and then inject it into your dispensing bottle.


10

The layer on the top is either separated fat from the ham and bouillon cubes, or a bacterial and/or fungal growth (aka a "pellicle"). If it feels greasy and/or brittle and becomes transparent when heated, it was just fat. If it feels rubbery and maintains its coherence when heated, it was a pellicle. A pellicle is not an indication of a botulinum ...


9

Commercially canned food (at least in reasonably wealthy countries, which I think would include at least all of the EU) is safe to eat straight out of the can. Provided the can is undamaged, of course. Damaged, bulging, etc. cans should be discarded. You didn't say what country in specific you're in, but your country's health, food safety, etc. department ...


9

It is normal for store bought canned beans to have a cloudy liquid. This applies to previously dried, starchy beans such as cannellini, kidney, etc. The water will get cloudy also when you cook dried beans. For others like green string beans or wax beans you would expect to see a clear liquid.


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