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11

The important part of the system are the lids. The ideal lids are the Mason-type (no matter which company produced them), with a flat top and a separate side piece with thread. Another type that works is the older Weck style jar, which consists of a glass jar with glass lid, plus rubber steal and metal clamps, no threads. This system is as safe as the ...


10

If you put hot (or even warm) sauce in a jar, seal it, and place the jar into the fridge, as it cools, it (as well as the air in the jar) will contract. The larger the temperature change, the greater the vacuum that will be created. Most likely, what you are seeing is warm sauce cooling and creating enough vacuum to suck in that button on the lid. If that'...


8

As already mentioned - no, don't keep dairy for extended periods. Have you considered making just the sauce base without the dairy - or even without the final elements that would differentiate it from being 'generic curry' to being a masala sauce? Sauce bases can be stored for months in the freezer. I usually have containers with just enough to make a ...


6

No, you shouldn't can products containing dairy. Dairy products can be contaminated with botulinum bacteria and the canning process kills off any beneficial bacteria that can compete with the bad ones. See eg this link.


5

To respond to OP's additional detail that the sauce that remained in the jar was unheated before refrigerating, I will just say that I have had this happen at least once or twice too. It's nothing to worry about. When a partially empty jar cools, the air inside will cool too. As the air cools, it exerts less pressure upward on the lid. Effectively, the ...


4

For home pressure canning, you should always use a Mason jar (Ball is one brand, but there are others). A "Mason jar" is the kind with the two-piece lid. When using home equipment, the two-piece lid is important because it will seal properly inside the pressure vessel. If you use a jar with a one-piece lid, such as in your photo, the lid tightness needs to ...


4

Which valve is which? See labels below: When to use the auto valve? According to user manual Page 6, Section 5.7, you are supposed to move the handle on the auto valve at least twice a week to make sure it doesn't get stuck. Other than that, just leave it alone and let it do its thing. It will automatically maintain your pressure and temperature. I guess ...


3

A pressure cooker basically has two settings, high (about 12.5 psi for electric, and 15 psi for stovetop) and low (4 to 7 psi). There are no gauges to accurately specify the pressure in pressure cookers. Pressure canners, on the other hand, are generally larger, and are equipped with accurate gauges so that the user can measure the exact pressure inside the ...


3

The book Putting Food By recommends canning pints or half pints (about the range you have) of hot-pack pimentos at 10lbs pressure (240F/116C) for 20 minutes (sorry for the American measurements, it's an American book). They also recommend putting a small amount of acid in the canning liquid, like 1tsp white vinegar per pint. By "hot-pack" they mean grilled,...


2

Not a full answer, but I found the video on this page showing how to use a very similar device (no sound that I can see, and text in Chinese) on Alibaba. It seems that the two valves with sort of rocker style heads are for steam release - you can flip these to release pressure once sterilization is complete - a spoon or fork or something similar will ...


2

It depends on what you are planning to do. If you want to get shelf-stable marmalade without a strict canning process, the answer is absolutely no. This kind of marmalade means that you're basically cooking a concentrated sugar syrup, and you have to keep it at the boiling point in an open vessel for a sufficient time for the water to evaporate. If you ...


1

I can't with good conscious give advice outside of USDA guides or similar authority as Sneftel does with the pH numbers. I will not however that in jellies, and wine, there are other factors at work in addition to pH. There is alcohol assuming it is not cooked out, and sugar content both of which act as potential preservatives. I do not have tested, ...


1

White wine is most likely acidic enough to be safe. The standard pH level quoted for botulism safety is 4.6; if your jelly measures lower than that (after cooking and canning, not before) then you're good to go. Remember that if you were planning to store all the jars for a while, you'll need to sacrifice one jar to test the pH. Until you have your recipe ...


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