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61

What about a piping bag? Fill the bag with a spatula, pipe into the bottle.


37

Physics stops you from heating up liquids that consist of mostly water to temperatures above (roughly) 100 C. The temperature of your heating element can be set higher, but neither the temperature of the water bath nor the liquid in your jars can go higher than the boiling point where water changes from liquid to vapor - which is 100 C at normal pressure ...


33

Exposure to germs is the problem, once you open these they are exposed and the clock starts. If you vacuum seal you are vacuum sealing the germs in with the food, and not taking steps to kill the pathogens. Pouring into a sterilized container again just puts contaminated food into an uncontaminated container. The only way to make them shelf stable again ...


24

As you state, you have not followed any canning procedures, so you don't get any more storage time than the standard recommendation. Glass vs plastic doesn't matter. So, I would just recommend freezing. Tomatoes, and tomato based sauces for that matter, freeze nicely. If you use freezer, zip-style bags, you can freeze them flat. They will then thaw ...


16

If you just damaged previously unharmed cans and they don’t show signs of leakage, the cans should be perfectly safe, even if you store them at room temperature. The US Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service writes: If a can containing food has a small dent, but is otherwise in good shape, the food should be safe to eat. Discard ...


12

The important part of the system are the lids. The ideal lids are the Mason-type (no matter which company produced them), with a flat top and a separate side piece with thread. Another type that works is the older Weck style jar, which consists of a glass jar with glass lid, plus rubber steal and metal clamps, no threads. This system is as safe as the ...


12

Edited: Concerns were expressed about such items being suited for food use. I've added comments in the text on "Food Grade" items plus a note at the end. How can I get a very thick or viscous paste (e.g. caramel, ganache, thick mayonnaise) into small-necked squeeze bottles without heating it up? Consider using a "grease gun" as used by mechanics. These ...


11

Anyone here who gives you an estimate beyond what a typical (non-canned) refrigerated sauce would last is just going to be speculating. The thing about canning recipes from reputable sources is that they are tested scientifically. They often run hundreds of trials with testers for a particular recipe, then test each for bacterial growth, etc., before ...


10

If you put hot (or even warm) sauce in a jar, seal it, and place the jar into the fridge, as it cools, it (as well as the air in the jar) will contract. The larger the temperature change, the greater the vacuum that will be created. Most likely, what you are seeing is warm sauce cooling and creating enough vacuum to suck in that button on the lid. If that'...


10

There are thick food grade syringes being made for that kind of application.. https://www.amazon.com/Syringes/dp/B07C71C1LH/ The plunger comes out at the back easily, so you can pour your sauce into the syringe, and then inject it into your dispensing bottle.


9

The first question is maybe how long they should last after opening? A week or two? Months? Years? The second question is IMHO the "mode" of spoiling for that produce and what conservation agents are there already. For some produce this is quite doable: sugar as conservation agent: Syrups with sufficiently high sugar content (> 80 % or so, that is like ...


8

As already mentioned - no, don't keep dairy for extended periods. Have you considered making just the sauce base without the dairy - or even without the final elements that would differentiate it from being 'generic curry' to being a masala sauce? Sauce bases can be stored for months in the freezer. I usually have containers with just enough to make a ...


8

I can't come up with a way to do this that is not problematic. First, no canning authority I can find provides instructions on how to re-can under pressure food that is already canned. The closest instructions I can find are from the national center for food preservation, which basically say "don't do it". Second, you're talking about a month between ...


7

No, boiling should not have created health risks. If anything, you are likely to have killed off some microorganisms that could have led to gradual spoilage (over weeks or longer) in the refrigerator. So, the only likely effect on safety is that you may have extended the expected shelf life of the pickles in the fridge. Of course, boiling the vegetables ...


7

It should come out of the bath with the button up and as it cools it pulls in the button with a satisfying pop. If that doesn't happen the jar may be sealed- there just isn't a good way to know short of forcing the lid. If the lid is stuck firmly, without jam having leaked out onto the seal, I would be confident in the bottle. If you really want the piece of ...


6

I just spoke with someone from Presto - apparently, the pressure is meant to be maintained by adjusting the heat source, and the weight provided with the canner is meant only to build pressure and not as a regulator. They also recommend against adjusting the weight in order to achieve in-between pressures. Not sure why on that last point - I'll follow up ...


6

No, you shouldn't can products containing dairy. Dairy products can be contaminated with botulinum bacteria and the canning process kills off any beneficial bacteria that can compete with the bad ones. See eg this link.


5

To respond to OP's additional detail that the sauce that remained in the jar was unheated before refrigerating, I will just say that I have had this happen at least once or twice too. It's nothing to worry about. When a partially empty jar cools, the air inside will cool too. As the air cools, it exerts less pressure upward on the lid. Effectively, the ...


5

One difference you'll find is that the sauce is not as hot with the green jalapeños, because fully mature red ones have more capsaicin. However, spiciness does not affect their preservation qualities. Mature, red peppers have a slightly lower pH than green peppers(paper behind paywall, sorry) -- about 1.0 points lower. However, both are still considered ...


5

Similar to the other suggestions, you can use a large mouth water bottle, sports drink bottle, or restaurant style condiment bottle as a syringe. I've used a large mouth funnel into one of these with dry ingredients, then put the lid/cap back on to use as a squirt bottle. If the bottle doesn't already have an opening, you can make one with a drill or knife. ...


5

A wierd idea - if you squeeze the bottle, put its neck into the paste while squzeed and then let go, it will suck up the food inside? :o


5

Cloudy material will be fungus growing in the culture. It is not safe to eat. Where the contamination has come from is impossible to work out, there are several steps in the canning process during which a failure in the step could result in the canning not being sterile and growing something.


4

As it stands this question is unanswerable as we don't know the specifics of your method - how long, what sort of pressure, acidity etc. However, I would take crisp beans to mean that you probably didn't cook them for long, which means there is potential for the process to have not been heated to a high enough temperature for long enough to sterilize during ...


4

For home pressure canning, you should always use a Mason jar (Ball is one brand, but there are others). A "Mason jar" is the kind with the two-piece lid. When using home equipment, the two-piece lid is important because it will seal properly inside the pressure vessel. If you use a jar with a one-piece lid, such as in your photo, the lid tightness needs to ...


4

Which valve is which? See labels below: When to use the auto valve? According to user manual Page 6, Section 5.7, you are supposed to move the handle on the auto valve at least twice a week to make sure it doesn't get stuck. Other than that, just leave it alone and let it do its thing. It will automatically maintain your pressure and temperature. I guess ...


4

It sounds like (benign, tasty) lactic acid bacteria fermentation, possibly along with leuconostoc or something. But without the appropriate levels of salt, it's also possible that less friendly microorganisms are also growing. As a rule, canned food with unexpected microbial activity -- regardless of process -- should always be discarded. Even if it's not ...


4

I found some publications about the decomposition of Bisphenols A and E in high-temperature water (BPA: https://doi.org/10.1039/B313509H, BPE: https://doi.org/10.1021/ie060888l). But "high temperature" in their context means 250°C - 300°C (at correspondingly high pressures), while at lower temperatures the reaction rate was practically zero. Since the ...


3

There is no way at all to do that. If you made up your own recipe, pressure canning is out of the question. It is only safe for recipes which have been developed and tested with pressure canning in mind. Water bath canning is generally also only advised with recipes which have been developed and tested for canning, in order to ensure that you have both ...


3

A pressure cooker basically has two settings, high (about 12.5 psi for electric, and 15 psi for stovetop) and low (4 to 7 psi). There are no gauges to accurately specify the pressure in pressure cookers. Pressure canners, on the other hand, are generally larger, and are equipped with accurate gauges so that the user can measure the exact pressure inside the ...


3

The book Putting Food By recommends canning pints or half pints (about the range you have) of hot-pack pimentos at 10lbs pressure (240F/116C) for 20 minutes (sorry for the American measurements, it's an American book). They also recommend putting a small amount of acid in the canning liquid, like 1tsp white vinegar per pint. By "hot-pack" they mean grilled,...


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