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37

Physics stops you from heating up liquids that consist of mostly water to temperatures above (roughly) 100 C. The temperature of your heating element can be set higher, but neither the temperature of the water bath nor the liquid in your jars can go higher than the boiling point where water changes from liquid to vapor - which is 100 C at normal pressure ...


26

The short answer is: No. The more elaborate answer is that certain bacteria are anaerobic and food needs to be heat treated to ensure it can be safely stored. Especial mention: Clostridium botulinum which leaves deadly toxins. The tealight inside the jar will not produce the heat needed for pasteurization.


21

These are two different ways to preserve food. The canned salmon was boiled and then sealed into a can while it was still boiling sealed into a can and boiled under a specified combination of time and temperature that has been empirically proven to kill enough bacteria. All the bacteria in the can are dead, and no more can get in, so it's sterile and won't ...


13

Canned salmon is sterilized. Sterilization uses heat to render a product safe. Cured hams are preserved with salt, and nitrites in some cases. Some hams are also cooked. Furthermore, some fish is salted and dried for curing purposes. Salt and drying greatly reduce water activity to render a product safe. Two different processes, both create a safe product.


12

The important part of the system are the lids. The ideal lids are the Mason-type (no matter which company produced them), with a flat top and a separate side piece with thread. Another type that works is the older Weck style jar, which consists of a glass jar with glass lid, plus rubber steal and metal clamps, no threads. This system is as safe as the ...


10

If you put hot (or even warm) sauce in a jar, seal it, and place the jar into the fridge, as it cools, it (as well as the air in the jar) will contract. The larger the temperature change, the greater the vacuum that will be created. Most likely, what you are seeing is warm sauce cooling and creating enough vacuum to suck in that button on the lid. If that'...


8

I can't come up with a way to do this that is not problematic. First, no canning authority I can find provides instructions on how to re-can under pressure food that is already canned. The closest instructions I can find are from the national center for food preservation, which basically say "don't do it". Second, you're talking about a month between ...


8

As already mentioned - no, don't keep dairy for extended periods. Have you considered making just the sauce base without the dairy - or even without the final elements that would differentiate it from being 'generic curry' to being a masala sauce? Sauce bases can be stored for months in the freezer. I usually have containers with just enough to make a ...


7

No, boiling should not have created health risks. If anything, you are likely to have killed off some microorganisms that could have led to gradual spoilage (over weeks or longer) in the refrigerator. So, the only likely effect on safety is that you may have extended the expected shelf life of the pickles in the fridge. Of course, boiling the vegetables ...


6

It ferments, like every other food mixture, because there's microorganisms (bacteria and yeast) in the air and the ingredients that reproduce and consume the sugars and starches in it. Any jarred vegetable, fruit, or herb will ferment unless there is something specifically to prevent microorganism growth. You can't get rid of these just by washing the ...


6

I just spoke with someone from Presto - apparently, the pressure is meant to be maintained by adjusting the heat source, and the weight provided with the canner is meant only to build pressure and not as a regulator. They also recommend against adjusting the weight in order to achieve in-between pressures. Not sure why on that last point - I'll follow up ...


6

No, you shouldn't can products containing dairy. Dairy products can be contaminated with botulinum bacteria and the canning process kills off any beneficial bacteria that can compete with the bad ones. See eg this link.


5

The button on a metal lid- whether purchased or home canned- is an indicator of a vacuum in the bottle. During canning, a vacuum is formed that sucks the lid on tight and pulls in the button so it can't be depressed. If the button can be "popped" then there is no vacuum and the bottle is not sealed. If the lid doesn't move that just means it's stuck not ...


5

Commercial peanut butter is shelf stable for several months in your pantry, however it is not acidic enough for home canning. When you remove most of the air in home canned goods you are actually setting up a good environment for botulism to grow. Botulism can’t thrive in an acidic conditions, that is why a low ph is essential for safe home canning.


5

One difference you'll find is that the sauce is not as hot with the green jalapeños, because fully mature red ones have more capsaicin. However, spiciness does not affect their preservation qualities. Mature, red peppers have a slightly lower pH than green peppers(paper behind paywall, sorry) -- about 1.0 points lower. However, both are still considered ...


5

To respond to OP's additional detail that the sauce that remained in the jar was unheated before refrigerating, I will just say that I have had this happen at least once or twice too. It's nothing to worry about. When a partially empty jar cools, the air inside will cool too. As the air cools, it exerts less pressure upward on the lid. Effectively, the ...


4

As it stands this question is unanswerable as we don't know the specifics of your method - how long, what sort of pressure, acidity etc. However, I would take crisp beans to mean that you probably didn't cook them for long, which means there is potential for the process to have not been heated to a high enough temperature for long enough to sterilize during ...


4

NO! Using your method you have created the perfect environment to grow Clostridium botulinum, so within a couple of days you very well could have a thriving colony of botulism rich food. From USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning Ensuring safe canned foods Growth of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum in canned food may cause botulism—a deadly form ...


4

Which valve is which? See labels below: When to use the auto valve? According to user manual Page 6, Section 5.7, you are supposed to move the handle on the auto valve at least twice a week to make sure it doesn't get stuck. Other than that, just leave it alone and let it do its thing. It will automatically maintain your pressure and temperature. I guess ...


4

For home pressure canning, you should always use a Mason jar (Ball is one brand, but there are others). A "Mason jar" is the kind with the two-piece lid. When using home equipment, the two-piece lid is important because it will seal properly inside the pressure vessel. If you use a jar with a one-piece lid, such as in your photo, the lid tightness needs to ...


3

Joe's comment is correct. If you haven't canned them as long as the recommendation then you can't have confidence that they will be safe for a long period at room temperature. Your options are to try again or treat them as not shelf stable. The downside with trying to can them again is that the food is likely to be hopelessly overcooked. For something ...


3

A "safety pop-up button" on a glass jar with a metal lid is 'safe' if it won't press/click when you buy it. Once you've opened it there's no way to make it not click when pressed. That's why it's a safety button. If it clicks before you open it... then someone else has already opened it & it is no longer 'safe'. If you opened it yourself, then it's '...


3

Absolutely, provided that it has sufficient salt and/or acid content, which is fairly easy for a chili sauce. The Ball Jar Company even has a recipe for it. You could also turn it into a jelly and store it.


3

Most likely commercial pickles are preserved by an accurate pasteurisation and ascorbic acid or other chemical preservatives so that the "brine" contains much less salt as compared to your homemade ones. It is mattert of the liquid density, yours is heavier. (Though the density of the vegetables might likely vary a bit - and though surface/volume ratio ...


3

This is a standard task for pressure cooking. Normally, pressure cooking only saves you time. But with dried legumes and with potatoes, the result is typically creamier. Also, try switching your chickpea source if you only had your experience with one batch. Maybe you just happened to use a batch that was old, or grown under imperfect conditions. The ...


3

I have made chickpeas 2x recently and I was happy with them. What I did: 1: Rinse and then short soak - maybe 1 hour. 2: Long cook, covered - more like 12 hours. Chickpeas are little beasts. They can take it. 3: Salted cooking water, enough to cover chickpeas and not extra. I think cooking in salty water gets the salt thru and thru the bean. I ...


3

According to Putting Foods By, 25th ed. (1982), you can fill tomato jars with just hot boiled tomato juice rather than requiring additional acid, and then pressure-can them: 10lbs pressure / 40 minutes for skinned whole tomatoes 10lbs pressure / 15 minutes for sliced or diced tomatoes ... with some adjustments depending on jar size. However, their ...


3

I like to explain the physics this way: heat is a thing, temperature is a place. If you put a hot thing next to a cold thing, heat stuff will flow out of the hot thing into the cold thing. This will cause the cold thing's temperature to rise, and the hot things's temperature to fall, unless other factors interfere. How far and how fast these temperatures ...


3

Generally, when you find that you have a jar that failed to seal, you move it to the fridge, and use it up quickly. ... but by now, you've had the jar at room temperature for a really long time, especially if you didn't move it to the fridge immediately after you asked. If it had been a few hours after canning, especially with a high-acid food like tomato ...


3

A pressure cooker basically has two settings, high (about 12.5 psi for electric, and 15 psi for stovetop) and low (4 to 7 psi). There are no gauges to accurately specify the pressure in pressure cookers. Pressure canners, on the other hand, are generally larger, and are equipped with accurate gauges so that the user can measure the exact pressure inside the ...


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