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I can't come up with a way to do this that is not problematic. First, no canning authority I can find provides instructions on how to re-can under pressure food that is already canned. The closest instructions I can find are from the national center for food preservation, which basically say "don't do it". Second, you're talking about a month between ...


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As it stands this question is unanswerable as we don't know the specifics of your method - how long, what sort of pressure, acidity etc. However, I would take crisp beans to mean that you probably didn't cook them for long, which means there is potential for the process to have not been heated to a high enough temperature for long enough to sterilize during ...


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One difference you'll find is that the sauce is not as hot with the green jalapeños, because fully mature red ones have more capsaicin. However, spiciness does not affect their preservation qualities. Mature, red peppers have a slightly lower pH than green peppers(paper behind paywall, sorry) -- about 1.0 points lower. However, both are still considered ...


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The physics behind why you can't heat liquid water past its boiling point is defined as when vaporization pressure equals atmospheric pressure. So, putting your canning water in an oven, which is at atmospheric pressure, will result in the water getting no hotter than if it were on the stove, which is also at atmospheric pressure, because the energy required ...


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I like to explain the physics this way: heat is a thing, temperature is a place. If you put a hot thing next to a cold thing, heat stuff will flow out of the hot thing into the cold thing. This will cause the cold thing's temperature to rise, and the hot things's temperature to fall, unless other factors interfere. How far and how fast these temperatures ...


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Physics stops you from heating up liquids that consist of mostly water to temperatures above (roughly) 100 C. The temperature of your heating element can be set higher, but neither the temperature of the water bath nor the liquid in your jars can go higher than the boiling point where water changes from liquid to vapor - which is 100 C at normal pressure ...


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This is a standard task for pressure cooking. Normally, pressure cooking only saves you time. But with dried legumes and with potatoes, the result is typically creamier. Also, try switching your chickpea source if you only had your experience with one batch. Maybe you just happened to use a batch that was old, or grown under imperfect conditions. The ...


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I have made chickpeas 2x recently and I was happy with them. What I did: 1: Rinse and then short soak - maybe 1 hour. 2: Long cook, covered - more like 12 hours. Chickpeas are little beasts. They can take it. 3: Salted cooking water, enough to cover chickpeas and not extra. I think cooking in salty water gets the salt thru and thru the bean. I ...


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According to Putting Foods By, 25th ed. (1982), you can fill tomato jars with just hot boiled tomato juice rather than requiring additional acid, and then pressure-can them: 10lbs pressure / 40 minutes for skinned whole tomatoes 10lbs pressure / 15 minutes for sliced or diced tomatoes ... with some adjustments depending on jar size. However, their ...


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I just spoke with someone from Presto - apparently, the pressure is meant to be maintained by adjusting the heat source, and the weight provided with the canner is meant only to build pressure and not as a regulator. They also recommend against adjusting the weight in order to achieve in-between pressures. Not sure why on that last point - I'll follow up ...


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I agree that those pressures are odd. I haven't personally seen recipes with such non-standard pressures. I've found that nearly all recipes I use call for either 10 or 15 lbs of pressure. Obviously the higher the pressure the higher the cooking temp and the more the food will be damaged. Ideally you would want the lowest temperature that will render the ...


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