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23

There are no similarities between the process of making caramel and making cookies. Pure caramel has one ingredient, sugar. This sugar is cooked on the stove and brought to a high temperature until it changes color. The process of caramelization consists of heating sugar slowly to around 340 °F (170 °C). As the sugar heats, the molecules break down and ...


16

Yes and no. There isn't a point at which they will ever be pure caramel - the flour would alter the texture enough to prevent it from being "pure", not to mention the chocolate would burn before that point. It is possible to have enough sugar in the cookies that it can become caramelized, but this would happen with very flat cookies, in a thin batter, ...


11

It is very simple, you just have to heat it long enough. It can even happen by accident :) The taste is a mixture of bitter and sour, while the smell component is mostly towards something burnt. Also, your assumption "because of the uncaramelized sugar mixed in the caramel" is incorrect, or at least incomplete. There usually is such sugar, but many of the ...


11

The problem with quick caramel recipes is that they aren't reliable due to the variations of water content in the butter and brands of condensed milk. Butter can vary between 15-30% water, if your butter has more water the caramel will be looser. The way to fix it it to simply cook it down longer. I personally think the microwave method is a bit gimmicky, ...


9

When heated, sugar will caramelize and turn into caramel. No other ingredients are required. According to Harold McGee in On Food and Cooking published by Scribner, 2004, p. 688: Caramel is first of all the brown, sweet, aromatic syrup produced in caramelization, which may be used as a coloring and/or flavoring ingredient in many preparations. But cooks ...


8

Caramel syrup, as the name says, it is a syrup, so it is composed mainly of sugar and water, then cooked to concentrate the water and caramelize the sugar. Caramel sauce on the other hand, usually contains heavy cream or other sort of fat-heavy component (some people add butter, or vegetable cream) to make it similar in consistency to a ganache. The ...


7

You ask about coating, but it is actually not very important. There are other criteria with much higher priority when you are making caramel or other types of candy. The important thing about pan when making caramel is even heating. Especially when making your caramel dry, you cannot afford hot spots, because you cannot stir. But if you are taking the candy ...


7

It sounds like you may be having temperature control issues. If it's not dark enough, keep it over low heat for a bit longer. If it's hardening/burning, it's probably caused by one of the following: 1) your stovetop (if burner isn't turned low enough or burner is too large and overheats sides of pan) 2) your pan (easy to burn things if your pan isn't ...


7

First off, to fix the caramel, I would recommend microwaving it a little bit longer. Start with an extra 30 seconds, then take a small amount and spread it on a cold plate to let it thicken and test it that way. Microwaves do vary, as does the moisture content of butter and even sweetened condensed milk, so the timing will naturally vary as well. The type of ...


6

It's not the sugar that caused the milk to curdle, it's the milk itself. Dulce de leche and caramel are both usually made with either cream, condensed, or evaporated milk. The issue with regular milk (especially skim), is that it has such a high water content and low fat content. The fat in cream buffers the protein, helping to prevent curdling, and the ...


6

Salt tends to enhance tastes, and make flavors pop, and is used in many foods for this purpose. Even most sweet foods, desserts or baked goods, will have some amounts of salt added for this purpose. Some certain kinds of salts - including many kinds of sea salt - are also called out for additional tastes or textures, caused by trace minerals or ...


5

It is odd that the original recipe didn't include a temperature, as temperature is absolutely critical in candymaking. That is probably why your results were so inconsistent, as different pans would have heated the mixture at different rates. I would shoot for a temperature of 240-250F (Hard ball stage) as that should be thick enough to coat the nuts and ...


5

This similar (also has heavy cream) recipe from epicurious recommends: "Room temperature, up to 3 days; refrigerated, at least 3 months." http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Caramel-Sauce-105889 ...And that conforms to my personal opinion, as well. I would not freeze it.


5

I have failed many times to make that kind of recipes. They contain false direction, especially when it comes to melt the sugar. Here is a quote which helps me. It's not accurate but you'll get the idea. The thing to do when you want caramel is to do nothing In the recipe you provide, the author stirs the sugar while it cooks. That's a bad idea. Sugar ...


5

In short, Butter. Toffee has Butter, caramel does not. Of course there are lots of variations, and there are some candies called 'Caramels', which may in fact be hard toffees. The softness or hardness of a toffee depends on the amount of fat added, and the temperature to which the sugar is raised. Strictly speaking, though, caramel is either 'dry' (pure ...


4

It is perfectly normal for sugar to turn dark brown when making caramel. If it turns even darker, it is because it has been burning too hot. The final temperature should be around 234 F, so you want to get there gradually. As for the color, many recipes call for cream to make it smoother and tender, but only incorporate it after the crystals are fully ...


4

In US recipes "individually wrapped caramels" will always mean the soft variety. If the writer of the recipe wants you to use hard, the recipe will say "hard". Recipes that ask for "individually wrapped caramels" are looking for this:


4

The only difference I can think of this that some non-stick pans can absorb flavours from whatever you've previously cooked, so you'd need to be careful those didn't affect the flavour of the caramel. The best way to clean a pot used for making caramel is to fill it with water and put it on the stove to simmer - this will melt and dissolve the sugar ...


4

(note : I'd have posted this as a comment because I don't have personal experience w/ this, but people keep complaining when I do as this might have enough information to be considered an answer) I don't know about this case, but in other times when you're cooking down sugar there's always a fear of 'seed crystals' getting into the sugar (causing it to ...


4

Upon reading those instructions, I can picture vividly the scenario you describe. It seems like the caramelized sugar would of course solidify and cleave to the bottom of the (relatively cold) food processor as you pour it in. Or is the friction of the food processor supposed to keep the caramel melted at its original temperature as it whirls around while ...


4

Salt is a bit special because of its action on the tongue. The sea salt, in this case, is a major ingredient added to be intended to be an independent flavor, but it is also a flavor enhancer. Often in chocolate, large crystal sea salt in used to give a salt crunch and taste. So, for this purpose, salt can be considered a complementary flavor enhancing the ...


4

I'm sorry, but what you are asking for is not possible. Caramel is a hard substance (I mean pure caramel here, not the stuff which has added dairy or acid and never hardens). You cannot even keep it melted the way you can do with water, because its decomposition temperature is lower than its melting temperature - at temperatures at which it is liquid, it is ...


4

Okay. Yes you can save your sauce if it's crystallized without seriously impacting flavor. You can always start over with sugar, so to speak. Unless you burn the whole dang pot, candy can always be saved. First of all, take your caramel (assuming you've tasted it and it tastes okay) and put it back in a pot with a fair amount of water. How much isn't ...


4

"Caramel" is a substance which is created by heating sugar. It is hard at room temperature, aromatic, and has many uses as an ingredient. It can be used "pure", for example poured into very thin slices, which are used for cake decoration. More frequently, it is dissolved in liquids to make a sauce or creme. "Toffee" is a kind of confection. It is made by ...


4

The basic difference is consistency: meringue tends to be lighter, airier, and drier, while nougat is more chewy. This is achieved by different ratios of sugar to egg whites. Nougat has significantly more sugar in proportion to egg whites. (Compare this nougat recipe, ~4 cups sugar/honey to four egg whites, and this meringue recipe, 1/4 cup sugar to four ...


3

The bane of sugar syrup or caramel making is unwanted crystalization. A few stray sugar crystals, a premature stir, and your caramel gets grainy instead of smooth. Corn syrup is an invert sugar (glucose), which can prevent this. Alternatively, a bit of acid (a few drops of lemon juice, a pinch cream of tartar...) will break some of the sucrose (plain sugar) ...


3

If it hardens, you probably need to add more liquid. If it burns, you should have paid more attention. Caramel requires attention. If it doesn't reach the nice caramel colour, it needs more time. Try to use the same method, the same amount of heat, the same pot and measure your results. When the result is not what you'd expect / like, change one thing ...


3

Most often they are called tuiles and they can be made in a number of ways, in some cases they are biscuit based or they can be made by melting sugar on a non-stick surface. and then cutting while the sugar is still warm and pliable. If you wanted to make a classic biscuity tuile there is a recipe here: http://www.finecooking.com/recipes/classic-tuile-...


3

Your best bet is to use rum extract, especially one designed for candy making, and to add it only after the sugar (or honey) syrup comes to temperature. The extract is going to have a much stronger flavor than actual rum. You will not need to dilute your syrup base to get a good flavor. Adding it at the end minimizes the amount of volatile flavor lost to ...


3

caramel (n.) 1725, "burnt sugar," from French caramel "burnt sugar" (17c.), from Old Spanish caramel (modern caramelo)caramel origin This suggests that what is commonly called Caramel is the burning (or almost burnt) sugar, either on it's own or in sweetened condensed milk or other milk products with added sugar.


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