36

A candy thermometer is pretty much always the answer when it comes to candymaking, which includes caramelizing sugar. Assuming the soft ball stage is indeed the best for brewing, all you have to do is keep track of the temperature: the soft ball stage is at 112-116C/234-241F. While you can certainly buy specialized candy thermometers (they often have clips ...


16

a lot of recipes caramelize sugar in a simmering water. Calling the solution "simmering water" isn't a good characterization. The boiling point of pure water is 100C. But the boiling point rises as the concentration of sugar in the solution increases. Once you're above 75% or so, the boiling point increases significantly. For 90% sugar (still 10% water ...


12

Yes, you are correct. Creme brulee exudes and condensates enough moisture that the caramel would disappear. If you want to make it ahead, you have to make the custard only. Caramelization is always done just before serving.


12

In the event that you aren't keen on buying/using a candy thermometer, I thought I'd add some additional information. The 'soft ball' stage in candy-making is the stage where the sugar has thoroughly melted - meaning it's no longer granulated. The non-thermometer testing method is to drop a small amount of the mixture into cool water, and see if it forms a ...


8

Recipes that call for water to be added to the sugar for making a caramel do so to help all the sugar melt, by dissolving some or all of it in the water. This prevents premature crystallization of the sugar. When you keep heating the mixture, all the water will evaporate, at which point the temperature of the (now pure) molten sugar will rise above 100 °C ...


7

Caramelising is a chemical process in which sugars decompose under the influence of heat (pyrolisis). It happens to any heated sugars, no matter if they are free (as in heating refined sugar for making candy) or bound in something else (such as the sugars naturally occurring in an onion). The outcome of the process are compounds which have a dark color and ...


7

It sounds like you may be having temperature control issues. If it's not dark enough, keep it over low heat for a bit longer. If it's hardening/burning, it's probably caused by one of the following: 1) your stovetop (if burner isn't turned low enough or burner is too large and overheats sides of pan) 2) your pan (easy to burn things if your pan isn't ...


6

You cannot "cook off the calories". Also, caramelized yogurt is still yogurt. Some of the lactose in your yogurt surely got converted to something else, but 1) there is no way to estimate how much got converted and how much remained, and 2) it is impossible to say what the result was (it could have been another sugar). So a conservative estimation is that ...


6

No, there are no other agents. Caramelization is literally sugar in a certain state. If you remove all the sugar, you cannot have a caramelization taste. You can make cookies which don't taste caramelized, of course. As for the "important structurally" part, it depends what cookie you are trying to make. If you want to achieve the texture of a sugar-rich ...


6

You can caramelize onions in the oven to do large quantities. This isn't less effort, and it actually takes longer, but it does allow you to do really large quantities; I did 20lbs of caramelized onions for one Polish dinner I was serving this way. Since I haven't been able to find a website with this method, here it is: heat oven to 325F/160C fill a ...


4

Walk away. No, really - it works. Once you add the water to the sugar, it will likely harden and clump up (I don't know how to stop that happening). But once it does, you can just walk away, and leave it to sit till it cools down. A lot of the sugar will just dissolve on its own, given time and enough water to dissolve into. Some mixing (occasional ...


4

You can caramelize the sugar without melting it. Perhaps that will give you the results you are after. http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2016/05/dry-toasted-sugar-granulated-caramel-recipe.html


4

It is perfectly normal for sugar to turn dark brown when making caramel. If it turns even darker, it is because it has been burning too hot. The final temperature should be around 234 F, so you want to get there gradually. As for the color, many recipes call for cream to make it smoother and tender, but only incorporate it after the crystals are fully ...


4

Unlined copper is sometimes used for serious sugar work, but it is very expensive and requires maintenance. For general home use where you want to get more than one use from the pan, a good multi-ply stainless pan is probably the best choice in terms of utility and easy of maintenance. You do not want ceramic coatings which can craze at high temperatures, ...


4

It seems that the best answer to your needs will be making a treacle. It may be challenging to do it with yams, it's typically done with less starchy plants. But I don't think it's impossible, it should be worth a try. Making a treacle basically involves taking a fruit juice, and slowly evaporating and caramelizing it. So, your first step will be to ...


4

As others have said here, butter isn't required. The browning and good flavour come from the maillard reaction: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maillard_reaction You can use oil instead of butter, though the flavour will probably be a little different. You can also add a little baking soda, as the increased pH will increase the maillard reaction, which gives ...


4

Onion can be caramelized without butter. Or any other type of oil. However, unless you are actively avoiding using fat, there really is no reason not to. The main benefit of using oil when caramelizing onion is the fact that oil can reach a higher temperature than water. To caramelize onion you need to reach about 230F. Water boils at 212F and will not go ...


4

In my personal experience, "caramelizing" and "quickly" are not things that get along well. I happen to have done a small batch of caramelized onions last night. It took two hours, which is faster than some larger batches I have done, but not anything I'd call "quick" - quick leads to burnt onions, not caramelized ones, in my experience. So - low heat, and ...


4

In case you are still looking for caramelised honey guides, and not caramelised sugar guides, I have found the following: lemony caramelised honey plain caramelised honey another plain caramelised honey recipe And to add the smoky flavour, first make smoky honey: recipe here Personally for smoking I would do it in the oven with wood-chips/herbs of the ...


4

I'm sorry, but what you are asking for is not possible. Caramel is a hard substance (I mean pure caramel here, not the stuff which has added dairy or acid and never hardens). You cannot even keep it melted the way you can do with water, because its decomposition temperature is lower than its melting temperature - at temperatures at which it is liquid, it is ...


4

Try gluing them to the cooked cake with a sugar syrup or caramel. Caramel is quite sticky, so it should hold the candied citrus on the cake with no problems, at least during transport. How hard your caramel is will probably affect how well it cuts, but I think a somewhat softer caramel (or a thicker sugar syrup) would probably cut just fine with a ...


3

Butter is not necessary. In fact, you can caramelize without any fat. The browning of the sugars in the product is what creates caramelization. To caramelize without fat, chop or slice onion, place in pan with a little salt. Cover and cook at medium for about 5 minutes. Uncover and cook any water out. Stir often. Deglaze the pan with a bit of water. ...


3

Here's a table that claims to give time equivalencies for cooking at different pressures. (This is from a website dedicated to pressure cooking information, so it's pretty standard.) It doesn't go down to 7 psi, declaring 8 psi to be the lowest acceptable pressure, but the time increase for 8 psi is listed as 47%. Therefore, I'd try increasing the times ...


3

If it hardens, you probably need to add more liquid. If it burns, you should have paid more attention. Caramel requires attention. If it doesn't reach the nice caramel colour, it needs more time. Try to use the same method, the same amount of heat, the same pot and measure your results. When the result is not what you'd expect / like, change one thing ...


3

My original comment was based on reading, this is based on doing. I tried the slow cooker (crock pot) method and am happy with the results. I added 3 pounds of honey, making sure that it took up less than a 1/3 of the crock pot, and kept the crock pot on low. I did stir and scrape the sides, but I'm not convinced that was really necessary. I used the take ...


3

Use a pressure cooker if you have one. I saw this in modernist cuisine but the above mentioned kenji (legend) has a discussion. The total cooking time is under 30 minutes.


3

Caramelizing onions works great in a slow cooker. Slice 5 extra large sweet onions in half, then in fairly thin half moon slices. Place them in a 6 qt (5.7 liters) slow cooker with a splash of water for 12 to 15 hours. Like magic they turn brown. Stir regularly after they have cooked several hours to even out the browning process. This also produces a ...


3

You can use a mini scooper to cut the goat cheese in spherical shape. After cutting the spheres, put a toothpick to it, coat it with castor sugar or dermerra sugar. Blow torch it evenly on all sides. Enjoy!!


3

Well, I'd say it has mostly to do with texture, but also with taste. To my knowledge there are three basic methods to making caramel: dry: without anything but sugar. In my opinion the most difficult method, as it tends to burn easily. wet: with water added to make sugar syrup, which is then turned into caramel. The water evaporates during the process. ...


3

I am coming rather late to this party, but here's my answer: Caramel made by heating sugar in fat (oil or butter) will never completely harden like caramel made in water or just melting sugar and will get very soft again when reheated. Also, it is much easier to control the color of the caramel when made in fat. In Chinese cuisine there is a process called &...


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