91

CO2 tastes good! Carbonated water is actually a weak carbonic acid solution; this is what you taste. It's like "salt and pepper", but for water. Slightly acidic water is usually popular, hence lemon juice is sometimes used to taint a jug of water in times when no carbonated water is available. Carbonated water releases CO2 bubbles for many minutes after ...


34

Brewing processes often introduce carbon dioxide naturally, usually along with alcohol. Carbonated beverages get the fizz and some spiciness/acidity without the alcohol.


32

According to The Brewing Network, industrial and food grade CO2 generally come from the same plants: The slight difference between industrial-grade CO2 and food-grade CO2 is the type of tests that are done to qualify CO2 as beverage or beer gas-grade compared to industrial-grade. Currently, the FDA's requirement for food-grade CO2 a 99.90% purity rating. ...


25

Oxygen is MUCH less soluble in water than carbon dioxide. This is due to formation of carbonic acid. There would certainly be much less "fizz" if soda was charged with oxygen under the same conditions of pressure and temperature. Also it might be undesirable to have high oxygen concentration in the sealed drink as this might reduce shelf life. In certain ...


15

An interesting addition to the answers above: There's such thing as nitrogenation, where nitrogen is used along with CO2. This is done mostly to replicate the flavor of beer with less carbonation, which is common in places such as England where beer is served at 55F. CO2 becomes less able to dissolve with temperature increase, therefore higher temperatures ...


11

Not sure how it applies to C02 specifically, But Food-Grade, anything (in the US) means special requirements on transport and handling, which implies more expense. So even though the same plant may produce it, the pipes leaving the plant have to be food grade, the tanks the product goes into has to be food grade. The non-food grade version will go through ...


9

As I am from "Apfelschorle Country", I have to chime in. Note that some statements below are subjective to a certain degree. For me, a real Apfelschorle is apple juice and carbonated water, poured into one glass at roughly a 1:1 ratio (or a bit more juice), not stirred. Bottled Apfelschorle is in my very personal opinion not the real deal - that's a ...


8

Carbon Dioxide (and gases in general) dissolve more easily in cold liquids. This means that it's easier to carbonate (inject with Carbon Dioxide) your soda using cold water than warm. As your liquid heats up the gas falls out of solution creating the bubbles in your soda. Fountain dispensers usually have the water lines run through the ice hopper (or they ...


8

Here, on the east coast of the US, there is a widely available, non-alcoholic, sparkling apple cider. The producer is Martinelli & Co.


7

To be a little more historical (why people started using CO2), I'll say that bubbly beverages all originated from fermentation. Even things that we have as non-alcoholic beverages - root beer, ginger beer, used to be fermented a bit (and still are, by people that make their own.) The flavors that we have come to enjoy were developed in the context carbonic ...


7

No. Shaking will create a lot of small bubbles which will act as nucleation points to release the dissolved gas when the container is opened and the pressure released.


7

What will help is chilling the soda water as much as possible. Gas is more soluble in water at lower temperatures, and the difference is appreciable over a relevant range (drinks fridge at 8C vs the coldest part of your fridge at 2C). Be sure to leave it long enough that it's well and truly cold, and handle gently.


6

Man tends to follow nature. Water passing through limestone ( CaCO3 ) dissolves a tiny amount of the limestone and flavors the water. If that water is artesian, it can have more dissolved Limestone, but as the water exits the ground, into a condition of lower pressure, the dissolved CO2 is released ( forms bubbles ).


6

As identified in my original comment, the most likely risk is not from the container itself, but from the fact that it's meant to be used with an immersion blender. Heat actually isn't a major problem with polypropylene (PP). It's generally regarded as food-safe and is BPA-free (see here and here for references), and its melting point is somewhere between ...


6

You are comparing two rather different things. A mixture of apple juice and water that is then carbonated (as your bottled product would be) is quite different from a mixture of still apple juice and carbonated water. I know that both alcoholic and non-alcoholic carbonated cider/apple juice typically have small bubbles. And you can purchase carbonated apple ...


6

More sodastream bottles is the best option if you are starting from a sodastream. The best other alternative is to act just like a really old-fashioned soda counter. Mix and store your syrups/flavors. Measure syrup into the glass. Add plain soda-water and mix. Thus, your sodastream bottle only ever has plain carbonated water in it, not a specific flavor.


5

None of these answers is actually quite right (though some come close). First, it has nothing to do with simulating natural fermentation products or naturally occurring liquids. Nor does it have anything to do with safety in transport. Nor does it have much to do with taste (especially since, as others have already pointed out, the sensation of soda has very ...


5

No, because the bottle would explode off the Soda Stream, spraying cream and foam all over your kitchen. Per the Soda Stream FAQ: No. Only water should be carbonated in the SodaStream Sparkling Water Maker. You risk damaging your Sparkling Water Maker, not to mention making a big fizzy mess! The money-back guarantee and the warranty are both invalidated ...


4

How to do it - practical advice You need a machine for carbonation. There are different brands. You buy cartridges with gas for them, put the bottle with the drink in the machine with the loaded cartridge, and press a button a few times. The drink is then carbonated. I there are also combined whippers/carbonators which can alternatively take a nitrous ...


4

Serious Eats just took on this issue. After some explanation of what "food grade" means as it relates to CO2, they go on to say, I got in touch with Dave Arnold, a carbonated-cocktail pioneer, and he told me that although he gets his carbon dioxide from a 'welding supply' place, that same source also supplies carbon dioxide to the food industry and ...


4

It makes things worse. When you shake the liquid, it allows the gas to escape more easily, making the liquid less carbonated when you actually use it.


4

You could probably make a foam. But a foam does not whipped make. Sodastreams use carbon dioxide wheras most cream whippers (which work pretty much exactly like a sodastream on the technical side) use nitrous oxide. One issue is that carbon dioxide reacts with water to form acid so your whipped cream will be slightly sour. Another is that carbon dioxide ...


4

It'll be because the tonic syrup contains nucleation sites, which are in this case tiny particles from the stuff in the syrup that cause the dissolved gas to come out of solution rapidly. The more nucleation sites, the quicker this will happen. Disturbances in the liquid can also act as nucleation sites - which is why your carbonated drinks foam up when ...


3

If you follow the process, the yeast are not cold-tolerant strains and shut down for most intents and purposes when the bottles are chilled. Plastic soda bottles also take a LOT of pressure to burst, and unlike glass you CAN gauge the pressure by feeling them (and they don't make shards if they do explode, but they sure do make a mess.) This is pretty much ...


3

Adding my 2 cents: Having constructed a coke bottling plant (not operated), I'm aware that tiny amounts of activate carbon is an ingredient and the reason given was that it would react with any dissolved oxygen thereby inhibiting bacterial growth in the sugared drink. In fact, if you were to drink fresh coke from a bottling plant, it's a bit harsh on taste....


3

I would think the Oxygen would chemically interact with the sugars and other components of the soda, and in effect burn the contents!


3

Carbonation produces the textural effects associated with effervescence, first of all, and a lot of people find that texture enjoyable. Texture is a huge part of the culinary experience and affects how flavorful compounds contact your tongue, thus affecting its perceived flavor. Carbonation also raises the acidity of a beverage slightly, due to the ...


3

Meats are indeed packaged with CO2, as well as various mixtures of gases. Some inhibit bacterial growth while others slow oxidation and loss of bright red color. Nitrogen is commonly used with CO2 to accomplish this in "counter ready" packages of beef. Pork sausage is protected with a mix of 20%CO2/80%N2. Gas companies sell lines of products specifically ...


3

Food grade CO2 is not meant for human consumption. For that, you should use Beverage Grade, which is more pure than Medical Grade. Both major soft drink companies have Beverage Grade as their minimum guideline. Food Grade CO2 is a dirty gas that isn't tested for several carcinogens...because it isn't meant to be ingested. You need to go to CO2 providers ...


3

Wilds of Russia? If you have dry ice, just adding pieces of it (chopped small) to your drink will work to some extent. Here's a vid: How To Make Soda With Dry Ice Be aware that not all dry ice is food grade. If no dry ice, you can get by with sodium bicarbonate (baking soda) and vinegar (acetic acid), or some other acid. Just mix the two chemicals, and ...


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