60

They look like the Dutch "mini pancake" pans... they're used to make poffertjes. There are nearly identical pans on sale here. The Wikipedia article talks about them more specifically: Poffertjes are a traditional Dutch batter treat. Resembling small, fluffy pancakes, they are made with yeast and buckwheat flour. Unlike American pancakes, they have a ...


38

Butter is a very bad choice for frying at high heat, as it burns extremely easily. Cast iron is the ideal pan material though, so you are halfway there. Take a flavourless oil like sunflower and brush it directly on the steaks - don't put the oil in the pan. Preheat the pan until it is ridiculously hot. Preheat the oven if that's the method you're going ...


34

What you have appears to be a vintage or possibly antique cast iron grill pan. The pan would be used on the stovetop and could be used for steaks, chops, burgers, bacon, certain vegetables, etc. The ridges can provide grill marks, and the channels allow grease to drain away. The shape allows the grease to drain to the outside channel where the pour spout ...


30

That pan is identical to the one used to make a Thai dessert that is made out of a coconut mixture. I live in Thailand and see them almost every day. It is called Kanom Krok and is very popular throughout Thailand.


26

You're going to die horribly from cooking in a rusted pan! Just kidding! A little iron in your food isn't going to hurt you, and can actually help prevent anemia. To quote On Food and Cooking (pg 790): "Excess iron is readily eliminated from the body, and most people can actually benefit from additional dietary iron." Now, to back this up further: ...


24

For what it's worth, this particular grill pan is commonly used to cook "Genghis Khan" (lamb barbeque), a soul food popular in Hokkaido, Japan. Genghis Khan consists of slices of lamb with an assortment of vegetables, typically bean sprouts, green peppers, and onions. The thickness of the lamb can vary wildly, with some restaurants or supermarkets ...


22

There are two parts to this question, the stated part, and the unstated "are you really frying an egg if there is no oil?" For the first part, most manufacturers of non-stick pans claim that their product makes oil unnecessary, and generally I've found that to be true. A little oil helps, but "necessary" might be a stretch. To maximize your non-stickyness ...


21

First off, cleaning isn't necessarily bad for seasoning. "Soap removes seasoning" is largely a myth; Serious Eats discusses this at length. The seasoning is actually a polymer chemically bonded to the iron, not just something coating the outside that will easily wash off, so anything that isn't able to remove the iron shouldn't remove it. Certainly a ...


19

Your pan is NOT ruined.YAY! What has happened is that you have burned off most of the seasoning. Any other kind of pan would be ruined, but your cast iron pan only needs to be stripped and reseasoned. If you have a self-cleaning oven cycle, that is a great way to completely strip the pan. You can also throw it into a hot fire (like a fireplace, wood stove, ...


19

Cast iron care need not seem so intimidating or mystical. There are lots of ways to take care of it, and though many will profess their own gospel and taboos associated with cast iron cookware, many different solutions will work. You just need to understand some of the basic principles and the rest is personal preference. First, in my naivete I used ...


18

A vegan is not going to eat your pan, just the food that was made on it. As no animals were harmed in the making of your pan (well, probably but how would you know) the pan itself wouldn't be an issue. Of course if a tiny bit of pan seasoning could go into the food, however anything else used in the preparation of the meal like cutting boards could cause a ...


18

A heavy based pot will not prevent burning, but it help a great deal as more mass retains and distributes heat evenly, allowing more flexibility with temperature. Depending on what you are cooking, stirring will also help. There is also the issue of cooking technique. It would be beneficial to know what you are preparing. If, for example, you begin a ...


17

A couple of things - the first is that I often hear people say that you should strip off/remove the pre-seasoning that comes with skillets, as it is inferior or will interfere with a proper seasoning done by you. Since you are having issues with your current seasoning, and it's not getting better, it might be best to strip it away and start from scratch. ...


16

I have friends from Hong Kong who always use steel woks in their take-away. A cast-iron wok would require a different technique for stir frying. It would be slower to heat up and retain heat when you didn't want the food to continue cooking. Stick with the one you have ...


16

You'd have to ask your vegan to be absolutely sure. If they're practical, they'll acknowledge that there might be a bit of meat fat polymerized onto the pan but they won't be actually eating it, as long as you've seasoned and cleaned well. If however they're sufficiently strict, they could conceivably say, no, it's touching an animal product, I won't eat it. ...


16

"3-4 minutes of searing on each side" sounds very high to me, and likely to result in a burned steak, especially if you don't flip it frequently during the process. It's important to realize that there are (at least) two temperatures that matter when cooking meat: the peak surface temperature, which determines how well browned (or blackened) the meat will ...


15

The right way is simple and straightforward: preheat the skillet for about 5-10 minutes on medium, add a few table spoons of oil to coat the bottom, and continue cooking at this temperature. Flip regularly, to allow the sides to cook evenly, and wait for the middle to become fully cooked. Now I will tell you all the ways NOT to cook a hamburger with a ...


14

You can season the exterior of the kettle to help prevent rust, if you like. The interior of a cast iron tea kettle is often rust-proofed through chemicals that accrue during normal use. One of these is lime scale. Repeatedly boiling water, especially hard water, will build a coating of lime scale that will keep rust at bay. Another set of chemicals ...


14

"Back in the day", cast iron pans were manufactured in a much more labor-intensive way. Each sand mold (minimum of 2 per item) was hand-rammed around a form, which was a wood (later aluminum) "positive" of the pan to be produced. The forms were slightly larger than the finished pan to allow for the shrinkage of the iron as it cooled. Molten iron was poured ...


14

The problem with your last step was the lid, I think. If you had placed it on the hot coals, open, the heat should have driven the water off as you intended, drying the pot before it rusted. With the lid on, the moisture was trapped inside, and had opportunity to cover every inch of the metal - and, as Joe mentioned, heat speeds up the reaction. Sitting ...


13

Personally, I'd just season the pan a couple times to cover the spot; it seems excessive to strip off all the other seasoning and start from scratch unless the pan is really deeply rusted. Other people may feel differently, of course; there are as many opinions about caring for cast-iron as there are people that own it.


13

Fire is typically a poor heat source for direct cooking. It fluctuates with every breeze so the heating is very erratic. It also produces a lot of soot which tastes terrible and is bad for you. When cooking on a campfire much better results are had by cooking next to the coals than above the flame. Cooking with a gas flame is more reliable of course. A ...


13

The situation you describe is burnt material all over the base of the pan. That is caused by using too high heat and would not be helped by using a heavier pan. The point of a heavier pan is to spread the heat more evenly across the base. A very thin pan would effectively transfer the heat of the burner directly to the food. It would be very hot where the ...


12

You don't have to re-season from scratch, just get rid of the sticky residue and make sure that the next layer of seasoning is very fully cooked on. The easiest way to remove the sticky residue is to scrape off what you can with a spatula, scrub off the rest with kosher salt and baking soda, and clean that up. Then give it a couple more passes of seasoning ...


12

Preheat the pan for longer than you expect, then preheat the oil as well. Cast iron takes a long time to heat up. With some foods you can get away with not preheating so it may seem silly to just let the pan sit on the burner with nothing else happening, but the potatoes will test your patience because of how much they can stick to pans. Once you add the ...


12

Steel wool, or other scouring pads, are made of quite small, rougher metal fibers or ribbons that will get into much smaller spaces, and clean away much smaller bits of matter, which includes the "seasoning" that coats your pan and/or the metal surface itself. In contrast, the chainmail links are much larger, and each link's surface is relatively smooth ...


12

As you pointed out in your question, Lodge A-Spray is 100% canola oil. It is also in a non-aerosol container. Those two things mean that you have no added propellants or ingredients. Most cooking sprays are not 100% oil. Most contain a additional ingredients, some of which would actually be a negative in trying to build your seasoning. Soy lecithin, for ...


11

The best is flax oil. The next best is soybean oil. The third best is liquid canola (not hydrogenated Crisco). This is because of where those oils are listed on iodine index; which is a measure of how much an oil will polymerize. Polymerization is when oil turns into plastic and is the actual chemical process responsible for "seasoning". Here's a whole ...


11

Can you get leached iron from cast iron? Yes Is it consistent in the amount that you get? No Is it dependent on the food in the pan? Yes How much? It varies hugely dependent on the food. More liquid, acidic foods leach more. How long its in the pan also plays a role. 3 oz of spaghetti sauce could leach as much as 5mg - that's almost 1/3 of the ...


11

All my attempts to "clean and repair" a sticky-seasoning layer have ended badly as well. I know who already snickers in the background, but my opinion is: start clean. Give the pan a lye bath and a good scrub, then reseason with a better seasoning. "The new hotness" of flaxseed oil goes back to the fact that it doesn't go rancid easily, without heat it ...


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