59

A cast iron skillet which is regularly washed in the dishwasher will be progressively stripped down to bare metal, which will quickly and consistently rust. It will not be usable for cooking until you clean it of the rust and re-season it. Incidentally, I think you might be confused by the term "seasoning". Seasoning consists of polymerized oil, ...


38

Your pan was too hot. Cast iron pans can get ripping hot (which is good) and retain heat very well (which is also good). But, on the other hand, if you have a thicker piece of meat and want medium doneness, you should not start with maximum heat, depending on your stove. If your pan is really that hot that the outside looks burned while the inside is still ...


24

What you have is a ‘grill pan’ They work well for meat, but the real advantage is that if you have something that gives off a fair bit of liquid, the food doesn’t end up swimming in it. Mind you, the liquid is still there, and doesn’t drain away, so it’ll still cool off the pan from evaporation, and slightly steam your food, but if it’s pre-heated, you’ll ...


17

If your alternatives are an oven or non stick pans, these sit perfectly in the middle. They really shine at high temperatures, and with marinated foods. I personally mainly use mine for meat, as my SO is vegetarian, and doesn't like their vegetables cooked in a meaty pan. However it also works nicely for bread products. I toast my burger buns in it before ...


16

First, about the literal question in the title. I would go farther than Sneftel: almost no cast iron skillet is so perfectly seasoned that the metal is perfectly sealed. The seasoning is good enough for protection against air, but dishwasher powder dissolved in warm water is super corrosive to iron. Already in the first wash, you will likely get some rust ...


15

I've had one of these for years, but usually can't be bothered to dig it out. The only real gain I can see is … it makes nice stripes. I've seen people claim it's for "lower fat" cooking, but I think that's… ermm … tosh.


15

The very short answer: You had bad temperature control. You have to leave meat on the skillet until the proper internal temperature is reached. If the outside burns before that, then you used too high heat. Also, if you have a very thick steak, you may need to use more involved methods. A longer answer: It is absolutely normal that cast iron behaves very ...


13

Your pan is getting too hot. Cast iron has a lot of" thermal mass", which means that it takes a good bit of energy (and time) to heat up, then it holds on to that heat and takes time to cool down. Most likely, your pan is still heating up when you cook your first pancake. It's at the right temperature, but still on the upswing and getting hotter. ...


10

Panini press You can make grilled sandwiches, panini style. While a real panini press cooks with two hot sides simultaneously, you can come close to that effect by flipping your sandwich while using a heavy lid or foil-wrapped brick to maintain pressure. Or purchase a grill press, preheated to help cook the sandwich.


9

It looks like the second attempt used far too much oil, which can lead to all sorts of uneven spots in the pan. Seasoning that thick tends to flake off when you cook with the pan. I would strip it and reseason immediately. In general you want to use a very very thin layer of oil, wiping out the excess from the pan with an absorbent cloth (I don't like using ...


8

You can use it for most foods you can grill on a barbecue, like sliced or whole vegetables and fish on (or in) the skin. Oil the food and have your pan hot before you add the food. Or what my mother did with hers, she kept it clean, heat it on cold nights, put in the bed before bedtime and take out before tucking the grandkid in. This does have risks, if too ...


5

Give the pan longer to heat initially, but use a lower flame. It sounds like the temperature is still evening out on the first one & has settled subsequently. Alternatively, do the first as you normally do, but drop the temperature before the second goes in. 'Medium' is not really an accurate description, & every stove & every pan is different.


5

I have owned many brands of cast iron and ceramic coated pans, here's the factors I've seen that effect the price: Quality of materials: better quality coatings last longer and give better results Refinement: some brands are more aesthetically pleasing, better designed, and have better finish than others. Some of these refinements may improve the cooking ...


4

I avoid dark-colored pans when I want to watch the color of a transparent or translucent mixture, such as cooking down fond or making caramel. (Situations where I need to make a split-second decision on when to stop cooking.) But I agree with GdD -- other things, like onions, are easy to watch in any color of pan.


4

The color of the interior of a pan isn't going to effect how food cooks, but you are right that a dark pan does contrast differently from a light or metal pan. My own experience with pans of many types is that color doesn't make any difference in the end result, I can tell if onions are browning on a dark cast iron pan just as well as a light ceramic coated ...


4

Cast iron and carbon steel (aka “forged iron”) are fairly similar. Both require seasoning for best results, and can produce a decent non-stick effect when properly seasoned; both have high heat capacity but mediocre heat conduction; both are quite durable. Carbon steel is somewhat more lightweight than cast iron, making it more versatile (you wouldn’t want ...


4

Yes, the two pieces of advice are contradictory. You have to choose which one you prefer to follow. If you decide to only use your pan below the smoke temperature of oil, the seasoning will not build up during cooking. In typical use, people do heat their pans above the smoking point, and the seasoning does build up. This is how cooking has been done for ...


4

The way you have worded it, the risk can never be reduced to absolute zero, so there is some potential risk. But the probability of rust happening is very, very low, so in practice, you can do this for ages and not experience any problems. Also, if you do, you can just strip and reseason. Also there is an option you didn't mention: usually you still have a ...


4

The instructions say never place an empty pan on an induction burner "Never" is a strong word. Too strong. Of course, you deviate from the manufacturer's instructions at your own risk. But as long as you are careful to not cause harm to the pan or the burner, it should be fine. The main risk to the burner is overheating the pan, which then gets ...


4

If it’s kinda powdery, it’s likely rust. Not quite fully polymerized oil tends to be orangeish, but you usually can’t see it unless it’s your first layer over shiny bare metal, and I wouldn’t expect it to rub off on a paper towel like that I suspect that you’re going to need to strip and re-season your pan. You only do that first deep scrub with pans that ...


4

There is an extremely easy solution to this problem if you want to invest a little bit of money: sous vide. Cook to just under the desired temp (or just follow the guide for the cut on serious eats or other good cooking site) and sear the heck out of it on the cast iron like you did using a high smoke point oil (peanut or similar). It's cooking for dummies,...


4

Heat moves slowly, and takes a while to travel into the middle your food. If your pan is very hot, the surface of your food gets heated so quickly that it burns before enough heat has got into the middle of your food. The skill in cooking on a pan is finding the right combination of temperature and time, where the middle has time to heat up to a desired ...


3

The way to evaluate the contradictory claims is to find a source who did careful, controlled-variable testing of flaxseed oil vs. other oils for seasoning cast iron. Neither of the sources cited in those questions is such a source; one is a chemist who arrived at flaxseed based on chemical knowledge but didn't compare with anything else, and one is a ...


2

As long as you use clarified butter (ghee), ie; with the solids removed, there's no obvious reason it shouldn't work as well as any other fat.


2

Consider the retained heat of cast iron when deciding when to pull it from the oven. Many recipes call for a 5 minute rest before removing from baking sheet to allow the items to finish cooking from internal temperature and to cool. The cast iron will increase the time of continued cooking out of the oven.


2

Mine was purchased a few days ago at HKD128 (discounted) at IKEA. It's definitely not aluminum as magnets are attracted to it very strongly. It feels like steel but not sure if it's carbon steel. It rusts very very quickly so dry it immediately after use. (mine, at 2nd use meaning, not too well seasoned yet, rusted right after an hour - I used it for ...


2

From Johanna in the comments section: In that case, regardless of if it's safe or mot, I would request a replacement from the store you bought if from. You're unlikely to get a smooth surface regardless of how much you season it and the seasoning will most likely just flake off around the swirl marks. Turning the helpful comment given into an answer as ...


2

Whilst the re-seasoning part could be considered a duplicate, that's not actually what this question asks. It's "What do I do with the existing surface?" You sand it off, or you get it sandblasted professionally (or you get all chemistry class with lye baths & other potentially dangerous stuff;). The cosmetic appearance is not vital, but your ...


2

I own a 40cm (16") cast iron wok and love it. But it is a different kind of pan from a steel plate wok. And it is heavy, very heavy. If you want a wok, steel plate as it is used in Asia. But if you want a versatile pan in wok shape, cast iron can work well.


2

Woks tend to be pressed steel rather than cast iron. It's not just the weight it's the leverage. A good 36cm (14") steel wok on a single handle is not easy to lift when empty; when full tossing ingredients is mainly a case of tilting it by pushing down on the handle rather than throwing it around like a skillet… & bringing the plates to the pan to ...


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