7

Fried foods neither hold nor transport well. They are best served directly from the frier. If they do need to be held, a slow oven which will keep them dry (by allowing steam from the food to leave) is the best way. There simply is no good way to hold, transport, and serve fried foods that will maintain the crispy quality. Think of every delivery meal ...


6

There's no fixed number, as you have too many other variables: How big are the people eating? (athletes are going to eat more than kids or people on diets) What are they being served with? (If it's just a table filled w/ crabs, they're going to eat more than if you have other side dishes available) How experienced are the people with eating crabs? (Some ...


6

About 8oz or 225g/person is probably a good place to start. Think about when you have a standard steak or a piece of chicken in a restaurant. The pre-cooked weight will usually be in the region of 8-10oz.


5

A good rule of thumb is to allow 1lb of meat (before cooking) per person, not counting small children who will obviously eat less. It's better to have too much than not enough - you can always use leftovers.


5

After helping out with a few events over the years, with one of the places that we hold events renovating but removing almost all of the catering/serving gear in the process, some additional suggestions from someone who's still a notice: Try to visit where you'll be serving the food in advance, to make sure that you're familiar with the facilities, and ...


5

It depends in part who you are serving--hungry college students (or those with that mindset) eat considerably more free food than do wealthy health-conscious professionals. You also need to keep in mind that while you don't want to overshoot massively, it also looks bad to run out of food. You may also need to keep in mind that a significant number of ...


5

Disclaimer: Not a professional Look at what organizations that train professionals use. For example, the Culinary Institute of America publishes The Professional Chef. My understanding is this an instructional text for the institute. From the introduction of the 8th edition: The Professional Chef is suited to a variety of teaching situations... Chapter ...


4

Yes, you can! Make sure to check the wings occasionally to see if the pans need to be switched to ensure even cooking. One of the racks may get hotter than the other. You can also make sure that both of the pans are placed as close to the center of the oven as possible by adjusting the rack positions.


4

Most book about molecular cooking tend to be on the expert or restaurant level. For example, the El Bulli books are full with exotic ingredients, techniques and equipments that are not usually found in home kitchen, at least when they came out. Remember that the big differences between a home cook and a restaurant cook/chef are not the recipes themselves ...


3

Some quick Googling leads me to believe these are "Bouchées Parmentier au Fromage" (literally 'mouthfuls'), which seem to be some sort of potato-and-cheese croquette. To find this, I did a Google image search for "Parmentier au fromage". This shows many different dishes (lots of which are indeed shepherd's pie-like, but it also gives a ...


3

For entertaining purposes the rule of thumb I've most commonly seen in your case, where the meat is the primary food being served, is about 8-10 ounces per person. That's size per portion after cooking. You are making pulled pork and brisket, and each of those will lose just over 40% of their weight during cooking. So if you assume 5 ounces of brisket and 5 ...


3

I worked in an Italian place that occasionally did banquets. This is how we anticipated an adult serving: Mains (meat / pasta with sauce / fish) 160 grams (or 100 grams of protein per adult, plus 60-ish grams of sauce, garnish, etc - this allows for a bit of extra) Sides are 1/3 * 2 of mains, since people generally have more than one side. Roughly 2 ...


3

You have this same problem with most fried foods that you want to serve fresh. Anyone who makes latkes for Hanukkah knows this problem well. So it's similar to this question What technique should I use to make latkes for a party so that I don't have to stay in the kitchen? You can try what I do for latkes - I put them on a drying rack, sheet pan, ...


3

For crispiness: keep the fish on a cooling rack and well ventilated no matter what - even when using steam tables, which should be fine for this purpose. For warmth: I have no idea how the fish will fare depending on how you transport it, but do not let the time between cooking and eating be longer than two hours unless you can reheat the fish with a fryer ...


3

If you really want to blow them away, the best option is to cook them on-site, at least partially. If you can prepare and partially bake the crusts in advance, the rest of the process won't take as long to cook and the results will be better. If that isn't practical, 2 hours is a long time for the pizza to sit out before you transport it to a party where ...


2

Here's a stackable pie carrier that will carry up to four pies or 1 cake and 1 pie. http://www.amazon.com/Fresh-Keeper-Dual-Food-Tote/dp/B0039MDTDG/ref=pd_sim_sbs_hg_1


2

Do you perchance have the time to do a "dry run" with some friends? You may find it useful to initiate a series of platings with structured feedback questions that can be answered easily (yes/no, on a scale of 1-4 rate X...), and maybe a free response if you feel like it. Serve in the environment closest to where people will eventually be eating the food(...


2

If you aren't able to get food orders from everyone attending ahead of time, you should start by making enough for each guest to have 1 serving each of pulled pork, ribs, and brisket. I'd say 6 ribs is one serving and 4 oz (cooked weight) is standard for the other meats. Then, as a buffer, I would add on a couple more servings of each meat, depending on how ...


2

When you visit your local BBQ places you normally see a few standard options. For the pulled pork and brisket, it is usually sold by weight. I believe a 1/2 Pound portion is the most common from my experience of eating BBQ with friends. For ribs, they are normally sold by half rack or full rack. A full rack is a lot of food so I would not think anyone ...


2

As long as you have enough space between your shelves there's no problem cooking chicken pieces on 2 layers. Some tips: Make sure you have enough space around the trays as well so air can circulate, if you don't you'll get uneven cooking Use convection (fan) mode if you have it to keep the temperature even The top of the oven will be hotter than the bottom, ...


2

The biggest scourge of fried foods is moisture. What you need is a dry absorbent vessel. I have seen paper bags packed with paper towels and left open to vent steam used successfully for what you are trying to achieve.


2

It is perfectly acceptable to serve both or just one or the other. Typically crudités are considered an appetizer but, when serving crudités, a salad is not always needed. I would base my decision on what type of gathering it is and the entirety of the menu. From The Veggie Table: Crudités is a French term that refers to raw vegetables, so a platter of ...


2

What I've done in these cases myself in the past is use this reference chart to get a rough idea of starting quantities per dish. In terms of the actual number of servings I always count a full serving for anyone over 12-ish years old and half a serving for anyone younger than that. After you've done that, you obviously still have to recalculate to account ...


1

Depending on the size of kitchen, the length of time you need it for and the number of people you are catering for etc., many community centres, pubs and large churches are willing to hire their catering facilities out and dining space as well if need be.


1

1/2 pound to 1 pound per person is standard for US when planning meat amount; pending on the overall average guess and type of party. For sides; figure on 2-3 gallons = 50 people Another way to look at it; since you have so many sides. 1-1.5 pounds of food per person; total.


1

In the past, when I host a party at home and I serve Buffet style with sides, Rice, Potatoes, Mc & Cheese, Salad and veggies, I end up with about 2oz of beef, whether is flank, tenderloin, etc per person. Remember, you have appetizers as well before the main and I serve, Garlic Shrimp, plus an assortment of dips & chips.


1

For American pancakes, my mom would always warm a plate or two in the oven, and then stash them in there as they were done cooking ... but American pancakes don't suffer as much from losing a crispy edge, and you'd run the risk of them steaming. You might be able to counter this somewhat by a clean towel in between them. When I do dutch pannekoeken, which ...


1

I think this is normal. I have heard of other empirical observations, for example tough sous vide despite controlling the temperature tightly. The problem is that temperature scales assume that you stop heating the meat at this temperature. But what toughens the meat is not temperature, it is energy. Each joule you put into that meat is beating up a piece ...


1

Have an empty cool steam containers or aluminum foil pans, place in the vehicle. place the fried fish ontop of a wire rack right out of the oil. when all done, place fish in paper bags. place wire rack in the cool aluminum foil pan or steam tray, place hot fish out of the paper bags, then place fish ontop of rack. Cover fish on a rack with paper, paper bags ...


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