23

It might just be a timing decision. Parboil it will take 20 mins in the oven. From raw, more like an hour. Bear in mind how long it will take to heat to the centre whilst submerged in sauce compared to being boiled or steamed alone. Some examples - 'Standard' recipe: parboil whilst making roux, add hot sauce to hot cauli, bake 20 mins. Jamie Oliver's 'pre-...


23

The flavor / odor notes you're experiencing are probably sulfuric compounds. Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli and cauliflower contain sulfiric compounds that are released on cooking. That's why the stir-fried crisp-tender broccoli tastes so different from the limp overcooked olive green florets. Similar to how spicy salsa fresca grows ever spicier after ...


15

No, cooking them for too long will make them mushy, whether they’re roasty or not. You could try oiling then a bit and sticking them under the broiler for a couple of minutes (watch them closely!), but i wouldn’t cook them longer than that.


13

Cauliflower is from the same botanical family as mustard and horseradish. They all produce sulfuric compounds in different amounts. The odor of the sharper family members such as mustard is primarily based on those compounds. My best guess is that your cauliflower already had some less-pungent sulfuric compounds present. When sitting, they either oxidized ...


9

You can eat cauliflower in every state from raw to overdone, and some people will prefer it in that state. So if you like your cauliflower to have quite a bite and do not want to bother with precooking, chuck it in raw. But if you want your veg to be super soft, you may even want to boil it longer. Or you can do as my mother used to make it, prepare the ...


5

At that point, I'd try buttering and grilling them to add some brownness, and maybe a little cheese. If the food has steamed, means there was a lot of moisture there in the first place. Could be you washed all the heads but they still had a lot of water, which steamed in the oven and kept the overall temperature too low to roast. Your other option to save ...


5

It is not difficult to produce a clear broth or consume. Traditionally, an egg white raft is used to capture solids, and one can remove the clarified broth. There are more modern techniques for liquid clarification, which can easily be found online. For example, agar can be employed to gel the broth. The gel can be broken, and the clear liquid can be ...


5

In addition to the 3 methods which MoscafJ points out, there is another one which is a particular favourite of Heston. I've used it a couple of times, and whilst its quite time consuming, it is very effective. Make your broth in the usual way - I would include the cheese as there's no opportunity really to add it later. Once its cooled freeze it in a ...


5

There are a few methods for clarifying. 1. Use the classic technique for making a consomme, which employs an egg white "raft" that captures impurities. 2. Agar clarification. See: http://www.cookingissues.com/2009/07/14/agar-clarification-made-stupid-simple-best-technique-yet/ ..., and 3. A centrifuge (an expensive proposition, but the most effective). I'...


5

If it is clear, it must be broth-based, with the cauliflower being reserved for another purpose, I would assume that a light sprinkling of perhaps less cooked cauliflower is used (rather than the cauliflower used for the broth) so that it retains its shape while sprinkled in the soup.


4

I would suggest making a sort of consomme by making a broth and then passing it through a muslin or cheesecloth. Pour the majority of the liquid through then hang the solid mass over the bowl to allow the rest to drip out. The tricky bit is the cheese. You might try adding it to the main broth, or adding it before the drip through stage to see if it ...


4

With an hour in the oven at roasting temperatures (400-450 F/205-230 C), small pieces of cauliflower will likely overcook, not under. Most recipes call for only 25-30 minutes in the oven at this temperature. Under foil, the cauliflower will add a lot of liquid - steam - and may even get sort of mushy before you remove the foil. You definitely don't need to ...


1

As far as I can tell from the recipe, the parmesan cheese is included mostly for flavor, plus a little crispiness as suggested in a comment. The mozzarella and egg are what keep the base together. Omitting the parmesan altogether should work. You can substitute any hard(er) cheese. I would also recommend breadcrumbs if cheese is too expensive, but that will ...


1

Fresh cauliflour definitely not frozen.Boil for 5 to 10 min.Batter to your preference including spices of your preference and deep fry for another 10 min


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