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14

This question is actually answered in a comment to the recipe you linked: kimberly says: Sorry for silly question, but the ingredient list says ” ½ sleeve celery $0.65 “. do you mean 1/2 of a stalk or 1/2 of a bunch of celery? [...] Beth M says: Yes, I meant a half bunch. Sorry about the confusion! :) I used about 4 stalks or so. They ...


8

Honestly, I'd say there is no substitute that you're likely to have on hand. The unique qualities of celery are mostly the cellulose crunch it provides, and the suggested substitutions like daikon, radish, bok choy or the like are even less likely to be in your pantry. Most likely you'll just have to go without or make a trip. If it is just the taste in ...


8

There are no real doneness rules on mirepoix per se (even raw is used in some dishes). However, the recipe designer may say sweat versus sauté to give an indication of colour and flavour depth to match the 'headliner' of the dish (usually the meat). Although not a rule, you may generally see sweat used more for lighter meats like fish and fowl and sauté ...


8

Trim the root end, then set the stalks upright in a tall glass, add a few inches of water, then stash in the fridge. You'll want to change out the water every couple of days, or can get strange on you. You can also cut it into shorter lengths, and store it completely submerged in water; this may be necessary to do with part of the stalks anyway, as most ...


6

My best guess is that the recipe is referring to the bag ("sleeve") that a whole celery heart comes in. Half a celery heart (about 6-8 stalks?) seems to be on par with the volume of 4 medium carrots. Here's a Save-A-Lot grocery store listing for "sleeve celery", and the picture is of a celery heart.


6

For those interested I googled images of the dishes Cindy mentioned and tried to match the description. This is what I found: First Celery, Second Baby Cabbage.


5

With much searching, I'm pretty sure that I found the two appetizers. They are both cold dish. The names are Mountain Celery in Hot and Sour Sauce and Baby Cabbage in Sauce Thanks to anyone who spent time looking. These are really great appetizers. Update: We made both recipes last evening. Both are absolutely delicious and the flavors I remember. We ...


5

You did not disclose your location, but here are some reasons: It is an opportunity taken by the producer to increase the price. They can sell the product as-is, or process it further and sell it for more (ex. whole onions vs diced onions, the diced onions will be more expensive for the same amount). Sure they need to spend a little more time fabricating it,...


5

It's all edible, of course. So, much if your treatment is personal preference. I find that the outer stalks are typically more stringy than the inner ones. You can use a vegetable peeler to remove a layer of strings from the stalks. That can help.


4

There's limp and then there's limp. As the celery ages, it will get more and more limp (and more bitter), and eventually neither delicious nor safe. If you're sweating the celery and it's a little less than crudité crisp it should be fine. Just sample it first to make sure it's not too bitter.


4

I'd use a mandoline with the julienne attachment and cut them lenghtwise. Or try do it manually with your knife. Personally, I think that celery is a hard vegetable to make into spaghetti.


3

You can chill them in ice water 30 minutes before serving to make them a bit less pungent or chill in the refrigerator in a sealed bag after chopping them into sticks (short term 2 days at most, rub with lemon juice to reduce oxidization past a 2-day marker).


3

Trim the celery, place on a lightly dampened paper towel and wrap in aluminum foil. Store in the fridge veggie drawer. Keeps well for at least a couple of weeks.


2

If you have time, you can do some mason jars with celery. You can act like it is shown in that tutorial: http://www.salad-in-a-jar.com/skinny-secrets/salad-in-a-jar - I know it's about lettuce, but I did analogous thing with celery and it was good. And if you want quick hack, just wrap your celery in aluminium foil: http://www.listonic.com/protips/get/...


2

Store in an mostly airtight container, even a basic plastic bag with the opening folded over will do Feel free to chop a long celery bunch in half. The cut ends do deteriorate a little over time, but not that fast, and it's better than bending or squishing them into the fridge Just don't let it sit in moving air as exists it most fridges


2

If you don't have a mandoline, I'd use a vegetable peeler ... but I'd first try to remove the outer 'back' fibers, as they tend to be the toughest. (you can often just start peeling the back (outer / convex) side and then pull to get those out). And then I'd use a vegetable peeler but work from side to side rather than back to front, so I had more ...


1

America ships produce 3,000 miles. This cuts weight in the truck by removing the tops. They can ship more. The tops are used for cattle feed. Unlike Asia. Were you buy at the wet market produce raised less than 20 miles away. America uses celery seed as a spice. Asia the leaves. Americans don't have a pig to feed scrap to on there street or yard. They can ...


1

The "celery" component of the salt is just there for flavor, and shouldn't affect how the dish cooks. Celery has a deeply vegetal flavor that can enhance others in the dish (hence why you see it in many soups, stews, and braises) but there's enough else in this preparation that you probably won't miss it much. I wouldn't try to use regular flour, though. ...


1

Mainly kinds of aluminum foil products are make by food grade material now, especially such made from food grade 8011 alloy. It's harmless to food and safe to human body, so don't worry about that.


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