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35

I'd pre-cut them myself - I tend to cut mine in the tin using a plastic spatula; after all they're soft and easy to cut. Then There are stiff plastic knives (for some reason sold for use on lettuce). They're much better than metal and will easily cut brownies. If you did want something disposable, some of the wooden disposable cutlery is surprisingly ...


22

What makes a good pan? The main properties of a metal pan that are of interest to a cook are: Evenness of heat distribution. Every burner produces more heat in some spots than others. The better the pan conduct heat, the more this heat is evened out before it is conducted into the food being cooked, which is important to prevent local hotspots in the pan, ...


19

Whenever something gets hot in a microwave, it indicates the presence of water. If something that used to stay cool suddenly heats up, you have water present where previously there was none. I assume you are using a glazed ceramic mug or jar, not one made of glass. Your glazing must have tiny cracks in it, that allow water to reach the clay underneath and ...


16

You can use soft cutters for some baked goods, but not for all. Wherever you need a sharp cutting implement, the solution is to change not the knife, but the cutting surface. I have three typical options there: Bake with a paper layer under the batter. Probably the most useful for something like brownies and other things which stay in the tin and tend to ...


6

Matching the size of pan to size of burner is the most important consideration for creating a cooking surface with even temperature. Parts of the pan bottom that reach beyond an electric element will not heat well at all and could remain a hundred degrees or more lower in temperature than the center of the pan, depending on the pan size and design. (Yes, I'...


6

Just use a glass pot, Corningware make some decent ones that can be used on a stove. But any glass pot designed to work on a stove with direct heat/flame exposure should work in this case. If you are worried about uneven heating or hot spots on a gas range due to less conductive glass, you can use a cast iron or aluminum heat diffuser plate under the glass ...


6

Quality austenitic stainless steel* should certainly not rust from boiling plain water (excepting MAYBE some rust in places like handle weld spots - the metallurgy is upset in these spots, and usually they don't touch the food anyway.), given that cookware is made from it that is perfectly dishwasher proof, and won't rust if salted water is boiled in it. If ...


5

I make ceramics (not pans) for a living. Maybe it isn't the ceramic layer itself that fails but the glaze used to cover it. Glaze is molten glass and can be scratched. It will also deteriorate in the dishwasher. I tend to take my (deteriorated) plates and cups (the ones where the tea stains no longer come out in the dishwasher) and refire them in the kiln. ...


5

Eggs and Crepes Get a cheapish lightweight Teflon pan just for eggs and crepes. To cook these foods you never need to go over 200°C so no health concerns. Make sure everyone in the household KNOWS not to use them for anything else, or to put oil of fat in them. That way they will last a few years of good service. In general Teflon pans never last long no ...


5

That is called crazing. It is a crack or fissure in the enamel coating on the cup, not indicative of deep structural flaws. Your cup is unlikely to fail in the sense of completely breaking due to the craze in the glaze. On the other hand, they will stain over time, and be unsightly, and hard to wash out. If the piece is old enough, the glaze may ...


5

the problem with ceramic knives and bones is that they are incredibly brittle. Any slip into bone can cause chips in your blade so I would just not use them when bones are involved.


5

Although you say that disposable plastic knives don't work well, they're frequently recommended for cutting brownies because of their naturally non-stick properties. I've used one frequently for this purpose, but I do recommend using heavy-duty ones. https://lifehacker.com/use-a-plastic-knife-to-cut-brownies-cleanly-1760035173 That said, I wouldn't bring ...


4

It will take longer to heat than a thin metal bowl. It probably wouldn't crack, being oven-safe - it's just being exposed to steam, not direct flame, so long as it is above the water, not sitting on the bottom of the pot (which is what you describe.)


4

The difference is in the conductivity of the materials with the glass being less conductive than metal. If the center isn't done...simply add more time. Worried about the top browning too much..cover with foil for the additional amount of time. OR cook at a slightly lower temperature for a longer time. ALSO...check the temperature of your oven. Just ...


4

Wooden knives work well, even the block-shaped ones for children. Avoid using any other materiel than wood and silicone. However, repeated cutting or excessive pressure will wear out the surface. it's much more sensible to transfer your food to a cutting board and return it to the pan afterwards. Non-stick care tips: https://www.thespruceeats.com/ways-to-...


4

Adding to Chris H's answer, precut the brownies for the potluck, but... ...line the pan with foil or parchment paper, and lift the brownies out of the pan before cutting them. Cut the piece of foil several inches longer than the pan to give yourself good handles. If you do this the right way, you won't even need to wash the pan. Here's what it looks ...


3

Like many things, this can only be answered based on the goals you're trying to achieve. It sounds like you're basically trying to find a durable non-stick pan or two, and you're willing to shell out more cash if it seems more durable than average or has other desirable qualities. I really only find nonstick cookware essential for eggs, especially omelets, ...


3

I found that using a stiff sponge brought my pan back to life. I use it almost every day and after a year it still works great. my guess is that a small amount of egg residue is left on the pan by a cloth, and it builds up over time; a slightly stiffer cleaning method takes this film right off. To be clear I did not use the abrasive side of the sponge, just ...


3

For people who believe that Teflon causes health issues and ceramic does not, ceramic becomes the better choice.


3

Personal preference. I own several frying pan from both materials, but the ceramic ones are much more elegant and beauty. Because of that, I only use it in special ocasions or when photographing.


3

I'd argue that you don't need any form of non-stick pan. But it can make some things easier ... frittata, crêpes, etc. And people who are on a low-fat diet may prefer non-stick pans so they can prepare their food without needing fats to keep it from sticking. You argue that teflon lasts longer than the newer non-stick ceramic pans, but like anything, how ...


2

I have had a variety of glass top stoves. The first one was purchased on 1975. I have used cast iron (grandmother's) stainless steel waterless cookware, spilled hot sugar, hot grease, and every mess you can imagine. I have not had one break and if it isn't perfect, just clean, I don't care. It is made to be used and I cook a lot. I love the ease of ...


2

There is no material which is "typically" used. The ceramic coating works on different bases, and I have seen both aluminum pans and steel pans with it. There are probably other types too. If the manufacturer won't tell you what a given pan is made of, there is no way for anybody else to tell.


2

Most likely, yes, it will matter. Unless your frying pan is really super heat-conductive material or the size difference minimal, the outer areas will be significantly cooler than the middle. That's ok (but not ideal) for dishes that get moved constantly (think stir-fry), but when making something that fills the entire bottom of the pan (omelette), you are ...


2

This is just a personal preference I would like to share here: Size: I tend to top my ramen with things like pork slices, vegetables such as bean sprouts, seafood etc. So, I prefer a bowl with wider opening so that I can still get to the ramen on the bottom with the food on top of it. But usually if the ramen bowl is wide, its bottom is flatter, and that ...


2

Ceramic pans are more non-stick than PTFE. They don't need oil. Ceramic pans are less durable. They fail within a few months of use. Ceramic pans don't scratch, they are too hard. No, don't throw it away. They don't contain the halogen elements found in PTFE. I wouldn't say so. Mine and my mother's failed earlier, and I've read many reports saying the ...


2

I can address a few of your points. Polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon) is the third most slippery substance known to man (the first two being incredibly expensive - an alloy of aluminum and Diamond-like carbon). There is nothing used in home cooking that is more non-stick. Teflon pans are NOT highly vulnerable to normal use with metallic utensils. Just don'...


2

Looks crazed. Sometimes that's a death sentence for a cup, more often it means that dark colored liquids can seep into the cracks, and make things look interesting. Sometimes not even that happens, and you just have a cup with an interesting pattern in the glaze.


2

Aluminium oxide is used in toothpaste (as an abrasive) and tablets (as an inactive filler). You'll get much more from these sources than from food preparation. It's essentially insoluble in water as well, making it hard to absorb from food. Some other aluminium compounds are much more soluble especially given that the stomach is acidic, and are a cause for ...


2

Essentially all food-safe glass and ceramic dishes are microwave safe these days - it's possible to make non-microwave-safe things, but there's not a lot of market for non-microwaveable dishes. Paper is too, but it's generally disposable. If you've decided that you don't like glass, you can still use whatever ceramic you want. It won't be any safer than ...


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